Category Archives: Computer Science

Asa Hutchinson: Setting the pace in computer science education – Searcy Daily Citizen

This year for the first time, enrollment in computer science courses topped 10,000, the sixth straight year enrollment has increased, and today, Id like to talk about whats happening and whats down the road.

To be exact, the number of Arkansas high school students taking at least one computer science course is 10,450. That is an increase of 6 1/2 percent over the last school year and nearly 850 percent increase over the 1,100 students who were enrolled six years ago.

We showed improvement in other areas as well. For the first time in Arkansas, the percentage of African-American students who are taking a computer science class exceeds the percentage of all African-American students enrolled in Arkansas high schools. Also for the first time, the percentage of all minority students taking a high school computer science course exceeds the percentage of all minority students enrolled in our high schools.

In addition, we continue to show tremendous growth in the number of girls who are taking computer science. When we started this initiative, 223 girls were enrolled in a computer science class. This year, the Arkansas Department of Education reports that the number has jumped to 3,135. That is a 1,300 percent increase over 2014.

Many publications and tech organizations, such as Code.org, have recognized Arkansas as a leader in computer science education. But we cant rest on our success, which is why Im working with the Arkansas General Assembly to open up more opportunities for our young people.

Last year, I created the Computer Science and Cybersecurity Task Force, and one of its recommendations is to require a computer science course to be taken for graduation. I am grateful to Sen. Jane English for sponsoring this legislation and recognizing its importance. And, by the school year 2022-23, every high school in the state must employ at least one teacher who is certified to teach computer science.

When we became the first state in the nation to require all high schools to teach computer science, our goal was to increase enrollment to 7,500 by the 2019-20 school year. We surpassed that goal a year early. This year, even with COVID-19, we topped over 10,000. We have done that because educators and students embraced the initiative. We have enhanced our education system, strengthened our workforce, and we are continuing to set the pace.

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Asa Hutchinson: Setting the pace in computer science education - Searcy Daily Citizen

Center to advance predictive simulation research established at MIT Schwarzman College of Computing – MIT News

Understanding the degradation of materials in extreme environments is a scientific problem with major technological applications, ranging from spaceflight to industrial and nuclear safety. Yet it presents an intrinsic challenge: Researchers cannot easily reproduce these environments in the laboratory or observe essential degradation processes in real-time. Computational modeling and simulation have consequently become indispensable tools in helping to predict the behavior of complex materials across a range of strenuous conditions

At MIT, a new research effort aims to advance the state-of-the-art in predictive simulation as well as shape new interdisciplinary graduate education programs at the intersection of computational science and computer science.

Strengthening engagement with the sciences

The Center for Exascale Simulation of Materials in Extreme Environments (CESMIX) based at the Center for Computational Science and Engineering (CCSE) within the MIT Stephen A. Schwarzman College of Computing will bring together researchers in numerical algorithms and scientific computing, quantum chemistry, materials science, and computer science to connect quantum and molecular simulations of materials with advanced programming languages, compiler technologies, and software performance engineering tools, underpinned by rigorous approaches to statistical inference and uncertainty quantification.

One of the goals of CESMIX is to build a substantive link between computer science and computational science and engineering, something that historically has been hard to do, but is sorely needed, says Daniel Huttenlocher, dean of the MIT Schwarzman College of Computing. The center will also provide opportunities for faculty, researchers, and students across MIT to interact intellectually and create a new synthesis of different disciplines, which is central to the mission of the college.

Leading the project as principal investigator is Youssef Marzouk, professor of aeronautics and astronautics and co-director of CCSE, which was renamed from the Center of Computational Engineering in January to reflect its strengthening engagement with the sciences at MIT. Marzouk, who is also a member of the Statistics and Data Science Center, notes that CESMIX is trying to do two things simultaneously. On the one hand, we want to solve an incredibly challenging multiscale simulation problem, harnessing quantum mechanical models of complex materials to achieve unprecedented accuracy at the engineering scale. On the other hand, we want to create tools that make development and holistic performance engineering of the associated software stack as easy as possible, to achieve top performance on the coming generation of exascale computational hardware.

The project involves participation from an interdisciplinary cohort of eight faculty members, serving as co-PIs, and research scientists spanning multiple labs and departments at MIT. The full list of participants includes:

MIT was among a total of nine universities selected as part of the Predictive Science Academic Alliance Program (PSAAP) III to form a new center to support science-based modeling and simulation and exascale computing technologies. This is the third time that PSAAP centers have been awarded by the U.S. Department of Energys National Nuclear Security Administration (DoE/NNSA) since the program launched in 2008 and is the first time that the Institute has ever been selected. MIT is one of just two institutions nationwide chosen to establish a Single-Discipline Center in this round and will receive up to $9.5 million in funding through a cooperative agreement over five years.

Advancing predictive simulation

CESMIX will focus on exascale simulation of materials in hypersonic flow environments. It will also drive the development of new predictive simulation paradigms and computer science tools for the exascale. Researchers will specifically aim to predict the degradation of complex (disordered and multi-component) materials under extreme loading inaccessible to direct experimental observation an application representing a technology domain of intense current interest, and one that exemplifies an important class of scientific problems involving material interfaces in extreme environments.

A big challenge here is in being able to predict what reactions will occur and what new molecules will form under these conditions. While quantum mechanical modeling will enable us to predict these events, we also need to be able to address the times and length scalesof these processes, says Kulik, who is also a faculty member of CCSE. Our efforts will be focused on developing the needed software and machine learning tools that tell us when more affordable physical models can address the length scalechallenge and when we need quantum mechanics to address the accuracy challenge.

CESMIX researchers plan on disseminating their results via multiple open-source software projects, engaging their developer and user communities. The project will also support the work of postdocs, graduate students, and research scientists at MIT with the overarching goal of creating new paradigms of practice for the next generation of computational scientists.

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Center to advance predictive simulation research established at MIT Schwarzman College of Computing - MIT News

Setting the pace in computer science education | Opinion – Paragould Daily Press

This year for the first time, enrollment in computer science courses topped 10,000, the sixth straight year enrollment has increased, and today Id like to talk about whats happening and whats down the road.

To be exact, the number of Arkansas high school students taking at least one computer science course is 10,450. That is an increase of six-and-a-half percent over the last school year and nearly 850 percent increase over the 1,100 students who were enrolled six years ago.

We showed improvement in other areas as well. For the first time in Arkansas, the percentage of African American students who are taking a computer science class exceeds the percentage of all African American students enrolled in Arkansas high schools. Also for the first time, the percentage of all minority students taking a high school computer science course exceeds the percentage of all minority students enrolled in our high schools.

In addition, we continue to show tremendous growth in the number of girls who are taking computer science. When we started this initiative, 223 girls were enrolled in a computer science class. This year, the Arkansas Department of Education reports that the number has jumped to 3,135. That is a 1,300 percent increase over 2014.

Many publications and tech organizations, such as Code.org, have recognized Arkansas as a leader in computer science education. But we cant rest on our success, which is why Im working with the Arkansas General Assembly to open up more opportunities for our young people. Last year, I created the Computer Science and Cybersecurity Task Force, and one of its recommendations is to require a computer science course to be taken for graduation. I am grateful to Senator Jane English for sponsoring this legislation and recognizing its importance. And, by the school year 2022-2023, every high school in the state must employ at least one teacher who is certified to teach computer science.

When we became the first state in the nation to require all high schools to teach computer science, our goal was to increase enrollment to 7,500 by the 2019-2020 school year. We surpassed that goal a year early. This year, even with COVID-19, we topped over 10,000. We have done that because educators and students embraced the initiative. We have enhanced our education system, strengthened our workforce, and we are continuing to set the pace.

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Setting the pace in computer science education | Opinion - Paragould Daily Press

Mohammed VI University in Benguerir Launches School of Computer Science – Morocco World News

The Mohammed VI Polytechnic University in Benguerir, near Marrakech, has announced the launch of a School of Computer Science.

The recently-launched Benguerir Data Center will host the new school. Moroccos phosphate corporation OCP launched the data center in August in collaboration with the Mohammed VI Polytechnic University.

Located at the Benguerir Tech Park, 75 kilometers from Marrakech, the high-tech building comprises more than 2,000 square meters of server rooms, along with other facilities.

The data centers well-equipped laboratories will allow the School of Computer Science to provide practical training for its students through innovation and experimentation.

According to a press release from the Mohammed VI Polytechnic University, the new school aims to address the digital needs of the 21st century and to work towards establishing Morocco as a digital nation in the future.

Starting in the 2021-2022 academic year, the school will offer a five-year training in computer engineering that combines theoretical knowledge and practical experiments.

Students will be able to enroll in the School of Computer Science right after they graduate high school and succeed in their baccalaureate exams.

The training will be divided into two sections: Two preparatory years and three years for specialization.

In their first two years, students will study computer engineering and digitization in a broad context. From the third year of training, students will be able to select a specialized field in computer engineering to deepen their knowledge. The specialized training includes artificial intelligence, data science, cybersecurity, and social networks.

According to the university, the teaching staff at the School of Computer Science includes renowned professors and aims to train future engineers who will be able to join the largest companies, create their own startups, or conduct high-level research.

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Mohammed VI University in Benguerir Launches School of Computer Science - Morocco World News

Computer scientist James Allen named AAAS fellow – University of Rochester

November 24, 2020

University of Rochester computer science professor James Allen (University of Rochester photo / J. Adam Fenster)

James Allen, the John H. Dessauer Professor of Computer Science at the University of Rochester, has been named a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS).

AAAS, the worlds largest general scientific society, elects fellows based on distinguished scientific and social efforts to advance science or its applications.

Allen, who is also associate director and a senior researcher at the Florida Institute for Human and Machine Cognition in Pensacola, is one of 489 fellows chosen this year. He is being recognized for broad contributions to artificial intelligence and natural language understanding, including seminal contributions in temporal logic.

His contributions include PLOW (Procedure Learning on the Web), a system that enables a user to teach the computer to perform tasks on the web, and TRIPS (The Rochester Interactive Planning System), an intelligent planning assistant that interacts with its human manager using a combination of natural language and graphical displays.

Allen joined the Department of Computer Science at Rochester in 1979 as an assistant professor after completing his PhD in computer science at the University of Toronto. He served as chair of the department from 1987 to 1990 and received the William H. Riker Award for Excellence in Graduate Teaching in 1997. He has supervised 34 PhD students.

Allen is a recipient of a National Science Foundation Presidential Young Investigator Award. He recently also received the Herbert Simon Award from the Cognitive Systems Foundation. A fellow of the American Association for Artificial Intelligence (AAAI) and the Cognitive Science Society, Allen was editor-in-chief of the journal Computational Linguistics from 19831993.

Tags: AAAS, announcement, award, Department of Computer Science, Hajim School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, James Allen

Category: University News

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Computer scientist James Allen named AAAS fellow - University of Rochester

MIT’s New Center to Advance Predictive Simulation Research Will Focus on Exascale Simulation of Materials in Hypersonic Flow Environments -…

CESMIX will focus on exascale simulation of materials in hypersonic flow environments. It will also drive the development of new predictive simulation paradigms and computer science tools for the exascale. Pictured is an illustration of a hypersonic vehicle, where materials needed for thermal protection are subject to extreme loading. Credit: U.S. Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency.

Center to advance predictive simulation research established at MIT Schwarzman College of Computing

MIT is among nine universities selected as part of a program sponsored by the DoE to support science-based modeling and simulation and exascale computing technologies.

Understanding the degradation of materials in extreme environments is a scientific problem with major technological applications, ranging from spaceflight to industrial and nuclear safety. Yet it presents an intrinsic challenge: Researchers cannot easily reproduce these environments in the laboratory or observe essential degradation processes in real-time. Computational modeling and simulation have consequently become indispensable tools in helping to predict the behavior of complex materials across a range of strenuous conditions.

At MIT, a new research effort aims to advance the state-of-the-art in predictive simulation as well as shape new interdisciplinary graduate education programs at the intersection of computational science and computer science.

The Center for Exascale Simulation of Materials in Extreme Environments (CESMIX) based at the Center for Computational Science and Engineering (CCSE) within the MIT Stephen A. Schwarzman College of Computing will bring together researchers in numerical algorithms and scientific computing, quantum chemistry, materials science, and computer science to connect quantum and molecular simulations of materials with advanced programming languages, compiler technologies, and software performance engineering tools, underpinned by rigorous approaches to statistical inference and uncertainty quantification.

One of the goals of CESMIX is to build a substantive link between computer science and computational science and engineering, something that historically has been hard to do, but is sorely needed, says Daniel Huttenlocher, dean of the MIT Schwarzman College of Computing. The center will also provide opportunities for faculty, researchers, and students across MIT to interact intellectually and create a new synthesis of different disciplines, which is central to the mission of the college.

Leading the project as principal investigator is Youssef Marzouk, professor of aeronautics and astronautics and co-director of CCSE, which was renamed from the Center of Computational Engineering in January to reflect its strengthening engagement with the sciences at MIT. Marzouk, who is also a member of the Statistics and Data Science Center, notes that CESMIX is trying to do two things simultaneously. On the one hand, we want to solve an incredibly challenging multiscale simulation problem, harnessing quantum mechanical models of complex materials to achieve unprecedented accuracy at the engineering scale. On the other hand, we want to create tools that make development and holistic performance engineering of the associated software stack as easy as possible, to achieve top performance on the coming generation of exascale computational hardware.

The project involves participation from an interdisciplinary cohort of eight faculty members, serving as co-PIs, and research scientists spanning multiple labs and departments at MIT. The full list of participants includes:

MIT was among a total of nine universities selected as part of the Predictive Science Academic Alliance Program (PSAAP) III to form a new center to support science-based modeling and simulation and exascale computing technologies. This is the third time that PSAAP centers have been awarded by the U.S. Department of Energys National Nuclear Security Administration (DoE/NNSA) since the program launched in 2008 and is the first time that the Institute has ever been selected. MIT is one of just two institutions nationwide chosen to establish a Single-Discipline Center in this round and will receive up to $9.5 million in funding through a cooperative agreement over five years.

CESMIX will focus on exascale simulation of materials in hypersonic flow environments. It will also drive the development of new predictive simulation paradigms and computer science tools for the exascale. Researchers will specifically aim to predict the degradation of complex (disordered and multi-component) materials under extreme loading inaccessible to direct experimental observation an application representing a technology domain of intense current interest, and one that exemplifies an important class of scientific problems involving material interfaces in extreme environments.

A big challenge here is in being able to predict what reactions will occur and what new molecules will form under these conditions. While quantum mechanical modeling will enable us to predict these events, we also need to be able to address the times and length scalesof these processes, says Kulik, who is also a faculty member of CCSE. Our efforts will be focused on developing the needed software and machine learning tools that tell us when more affordable physical models can address the length scalechallenge and when we need quantum mechanics to address the accuracy challenge.

CESMIX researchers plan on disseminating their results via multiple open-source software projects, engaging their developer and user communities. The project will also support the work of postdocs, graduate students, and research scientists at MIT with the overarching goal of creating new paradigms of practice for the next generation of computational scientists.

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MIT's New Center to Advance Predictive Simulation Research Will Focus on Exascale Simulation of Materials in Hypersonic Flow Environments -...

4-H ignites a passion for science and technology in Minnesota youth – Southernminn.com

Imagine. Your whole body vibrates as your spacecraft prepares for ascent; indicator knobs light up like fireworks in the sky. With hands-on activities in tow; space command counts down for your departure...three, two, one BLAST OFF.

4-H STEM programming, from engineering to drone racing to polymer science, offers youth of all ages the chance to explore and discover a universe of exciting opportunities.

Our goal for 4-H STEM experiences is for youth to find their spark, said Michael Compton, Extension educator and director of 4-H STEM programs. And we want to help them become better communicators, problem solvers, decision makers, and collaborators too.

14,487 Minnesota youth took part in 4-H technology and engineering experiences last year.

Constructing a new world

Red dust makes clouds in the atmosphere as we land at our first stop on this 4-H STEM adventure. Craters and canyons engrave the rock. We are just about ready to explore, but first we need our spacesuits!

40 youth from 10 Minnesota counties are engaged in five, 30 minute sessions during the week of Nov. 16 through Nov. 24 in the exploration called Mission to Mars. This hybrid learning series combines live online sessions with hands-on learning activities that ensure young participants can dig deep into the wonders of building a life on Mars.

Each participant received an at-home learning kit to support their experience. The kits included all the supplies necessary for hands-on activities that explore how mechanical engineering, physics, computer science and agriculture play critical roles in creating inhabitable societies.

At live online meetings, youth interact with one another, share what they learned from the at-home activities and work together to complete a weekly mission. The Nov. 17 session, called Red Planet Odyssey Adventure, challenged youth to use a set list of materials to build their very own rovers that could explore the surface of Mars (or their living room).

The combination of collaborative and independent learning creates space for youth to explore what gets them excited and share their learning with others who have similar passions. I learned that Mariner 9 mapped 85% of the Mars surface and sent back over 7,000 images to Earth! said Sydney Ogren of Anoka County. Her excitement and surprise was shared by Aliee Ravinski from St. Louis County, who was shocked to learn that Mars temperature is inhabitable to humans. I didnt know Mars has permafrost! she said with clear enthusiasm.

Engineering a better drone

After the exciting visit to our Mission to Mars, we descend back to Earth and land in Chisago County where 4-Hers are exploring robotics, coding and aerospace engineering in the 4-H Drones Club. This new STEM program is for youth in grades 6-13 who are curious about hands-on career options in tech.

When in session, club members learn how to build drones from scratch, practice drone flying using computer simulation and design drone race courses for real world experience. I learned how to fly and solder a drone, said Marshall Tveit, a 13 year old from Isanti County. And Im better able to explain new things when showing them to people.

Extension Educators Jeremy Freeman (Chisago) and Jennifer Johnson (Isanti) brought drone programming to 4-H beginning of 2019 in partnership with Youth Drone Sports. Not only do youth explore the mechanics of drone design, they also get to meet people from different backgrounds and walks of life, said Freeman. Our club members have been invited to drone flying competitions across the Twin Cities since the program began and have met some great people.

The 4-H Drone Club is scheduled to expand to Benton and Isanti Counties with the goal of tripling total capacity.

Discovering new possibilities

After all that flying, were settling back into life on Earths surface. Our legs feel like jelly but were on the path to learn even more about how STEM makes a difference for our communities and world.

The 4-H Green Superheroes of Science League is a learning series that engages kindergarten through third grade youth in experiments connected to polymer science. There are 59 youth from 23 Minnesota counties who are participating this fall.

The goal of the program is to excite our youngest 4-H members in science and engineering, says Anne Stevenson, Extension educator, and member of the 4-H STEM team. We want all young people to develop science skills such as making observations using their senses, and planning and conducting investigations.

The 4-H Green Superheroes meet weekly online to show and tell what they explored, tested and discovered during video-guided at-home experiments. Hannah Grant, a 7 year old from Goodhue County talked about her discoveries during the programs first experiment: How to make the best slime. She tried two different slime recipes; one provided by a 4-H teen teacher and the other of her own creation, and then compared their properties. Each was different, she said Sometimes things can be good in different ways.

4-H offers a variety of STEM learning experiences for youth of all ages. Find your next 4-H STEM adventure on our website.

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4-H ignites a passion for science and technology in Minnesota youth - Southernminn.com

HCCC Offers Opportunities for Adjunct Faculty and Instructors at Virtual Job Fair – The Hudson Reporter

Hudson County Community College (HCCC) will host a Virtual Job Fair on Monday, December 7, from 4 7 p.m. for those interested in serving on the Colleges award-winning team of educators.

Opportunities are available for online, remote, and on-campus instruction as Adjunct Faculty and Instructors in the following areas:

For additional information, candidates for employment as adjunct faculty and instructors may contact Lilisa Williams, Director of Faculty and Staff Development, at lwilliams@hccc.edu. A masters degree in the discipline taught is required, except for Continuing Education, Workforce Development, and Culinary Arts, which require a Bachelors degree. College teaching skills are preferred. Additional requirements include flexible scheduling and willingness to attend professional development and required Human Resources training.

Information is available at http://hccc.edu/ajf2020/. Interested candidates may register for the Virtual Job Fair at https://tinyurl.com/jobfairHCCC. Event Number: 132 309 5075; Password: AFVC2020.

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HCCC Offers Opportunities for Adjunct Faculty and Instructors at Virtual Job Fair - The Hudson Reporter

Missouri S&T News and Events Missouri S&T faculty honored for outstanding teaching – Missouri S&T News and Research

Forty-two faculty members from Missouri University of Science and Technology have been honored with the Outstanding Teaching Award based on their end-of-course evaluation scores for academic year 2019-20. An additional 35 faculty members received an Outstanding Teaching Commendation.

Two faculty members are also being honored with the Sustained Excellence in Outstanding Teaching Award, which recognizes faculty members who have received Outstanding Teaching Awards for at least nine out of the last 10 years.

Recipients of the Sustained Excellence in Outstanding Teaching Award will receive a monetary award, which is provided by theForsee Family Engineering Faculty Fund, Finley Faculty Enhancement endowment and the Class of 1937 Faculty Excellence endowment.

University officials plan to formally recognize the award recipients at a banquet this coming spring.

The 2019-20 Sustained Excellence in Outstanding Teaching Award will be presented to:

The 42 S&T faculty members who will be honored with the Outstanding Teaching Award for 2019-20 are:

The 35 faculty members who received the Outstanding Teaching Commendation for 2019-2020 are:

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Missouri S&T News and Events Missouri S&T faculty honored for outstanding teaching - Missouri S&T News and Research

Students and schools in the news – Blue Springs Examiner

The Examiner

Redhage and Wood do well atforensics tournament

Casie Redhage of Blue Springs and Drake Wood of Lees Summit, students at Simpson College in Iowa, participated in the Oct. 16-17 speech and debate tournament at the University of Central Missouri in Warrensburg, Mo. Both achieved finalist status in the public forum debate competition and helped the Simpson College team capture first place in the team sweepstakes and third place in the individual event sweepstakes.

Blue Springs resident honored at Colgate University

Savanna England, a graduate of Blue Springs High School, is a member of the Colgate University class of 2020, majoring in molecular biology. England has earned the deans award with distinction, having earned a grade-point average of 3.6 or higher.

Blue Springs resident In Nebraska marching band

Patrick Orel of Blue Springs is a junior computer science major at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, where he plays horn in the marching band.

Local Students graduate From Missouri State University

On Oct. 11, an in-person commencement ceremony was held for spring and summer graduates of Missouri State University in Springfield. Local students who were honored at that ceremony include:

Blue Springs: Jana Hester, master of arts.

Independence: Heidi Jennifer Banks, bachelor of science; Jason A. Grubb, master of science in education; Caitlin Celest Braton Sifuentes, bachelor of science, magna cum laude.

Lees Summit: Simon Reagan Ales, bachelor of science; James Bailey Bertken, bachelor of science; Chase Alexander Chancy, bachelor of science; Samuel Michael Dow, bachelor of science; Natalie R. Pritchett, bachelor of science; Clara Richardson, bachelor of science; Jacob Riley, bachelor of science; Evan Lake Robertson, bachelor of science; Jaclyn S. Roemer, bachelor of science.

Raytown: Aurora A. Barrera, bachelor of science; Nathan Alexander Harrel, bachelor of science; Claire Danielle Quin, master of science.

Examiner staff

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Students and schools in the news - Blue Springs Examiner