Category Archives: Computer Science

Computer science, environmental health experts at UIC team up to protect US Navy divers with AI | UIC Today – UIC Today

The U.S. Office of Naval Research has awarded University of Illinois Chicago researchers $725,000 to develop an artificial intelligence system that can help protect divers from waterborne bacteria, parasites, and other harmful pathogens and microbes.

Sailors are sent into all kinds of water as part of their service in the U.S. Navy, but they have limited resources to understand in real-time the health risks that may exist when they conduct underwater duties everything from fleet maintenance and repairs to search and rescue and research missions. The most reliable water testing technologies typically rely on lab-based analysis of samples and scientists knowing which microbes to screen. But with dynamic weather, currents, water temperatures, and sewage and pollution factors, the exact condition of water, particularly of coastal water, at a specific time is hard to predict.

By the time a water sample arrives at a lab and is tested, the conditions may have changed, said Dr. Samuel Dorevitch, associate professor of environmental and occupational health sciences at the School of Public Health and co-principal investigator. If Navy divers had real-time information, they could select the best protective equipment, dive duration and take other measures to prevent the various health issues, like heat stress or gastrointestinal, skin, and respiratory infections that may result from microbes in water.

Thats where a new approach using artificial intelligence can make a difference.

Artificial intelligence offers a way to synthesize a vast amount of information quickly for a specific calculation and this technology, if we can bring it to fruition, provides an opportunity for us to improve the tools available to the Navy, said Isabel Cruz, distinguished professor of computer science at the College of Engineering and co-principal investigator.

The researchers hope that they can develop a system that can be used in any location by divers to analyze water conditions through a combination of user-provided and web-based information and human data, such as the age of the divers, their health, and the size of the diving team.

This project is both exciting and challenging because of its multidimensionality, Cruz said. We hope to pull information from many sources that offer different types of data, and we will have to integrate data that are quite complex, heterogeneous, and often without metadata. We will build the artificial intelligence and machine learning methods in stages, and if we can teach our system to reliably and accurately filter and prioritize all these data for risk prediction, I think we will have something remarkable.

If we could provide divers or their commanders with a handheld device or app to evaluate the ever-changing ecosystem of a particular body of water and any potential health risks at the time they enter the water, they would be better able to plan their mission for optimal health and safety, Dorevitch said. For those in the Navy, getting in the water is not optional and anything we can do to aid quick, data-driven decision-making for mitigating health risk is beneficial.

Charlie Catlett, senior research scientist at Discovery Partners Institute, is a co-investigator. The grant, which started May 16, will support this research fortwo years.

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Computer science, environmental health experts at UIC team up to protect US Navy divers with AI | UIC Today - UIC Today

David Haussler ranked 6th among top scientists in computer science – UC Santa Cruz

David Haussler, a distinguished professor of biomolecular engineering in the Baskin School of Engineering and director of the UC Santa Cruz Genomics Institute, is among the top scientists in computer science, ranked sixth in the 2021 Seventh Edition of the Top Scientists Ranking for Computer Science & Electronics.

Hausslers early research in machine learning helped found the field of computational learning theory, and his later work helped revolutionize the field of genomics with the introduction of advanced statistical and algorithmic methods. His genomics work accelerates the understanding of cancer, human development, evolution, neuroscience and many other areas of the life sciences.

Prepared by Guide2Research, one of the leading portals for computer science research, the Top Scientists Ranking is a definitive list of leading scientists from the field of computer science and electronics, based on a detailed examination of more than 6,300 profiles on Google Scholar and DBLP (an online computer science bibliography service). Position in the ranking is based on each scientists influential contributions as measured by their h-index. The h-index quantifies an individual's scientific research output, measuring both productivity and citation impact (how often a scientists publications are cited by other researchers).

Hausslers work lies at the interface of mathematics, computer science, and molecular biology. He develops new statistical and algorithmic methods to explore the molecular function and evolution of the human genome, integrating cross-species comparative and high-throughput genomics data to study gene structure, function, and regulation. He is credited with early insights into the power of artificial neural networks and other machine learning methods, and for pioneering the use of hidden Markov models (HMMs) in genomics.

As a collaborator on the international Human Genome Project, his team posted the first publicly available computational assembly of the human genome sequence on the Internet on July 7, 2000. Following this, his team developed the UCSC Genome Browser, a web-based tool that is used extensively in biomedical research and serves as the platform for several large-scale genomics projects.

A Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator, Haussler is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the National Academy of Engineering, and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He has received many awards and honors for his accomplishments, including the 2015 Dan David Prize, the 2011 Weldon Memorial Prize from University of Oxford, and the 2003 ACM Allen Newell Award. Haussler received his PhD in computer science from the University of Colorado at Boulder. He joined the UCSC faculty in 1986.

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David Haussler ranked 6th among top scientists in computer science - UC Santa Cruz

Computer Science, Environmental Health Experts at UIC Team Up to Protect US Navy Divers with AI – Newswise

Newswise The U.S. Office of Naval Research has awarded University of Illinois Chicago researchers $725,000 to develop an artificial intelligence system that can help protect divers from waterborne bacteria, parasites, and other harmful pathogens and microbes.

Sailors are sent into all kinds of water as part of their service in the U.S. Navy, but they have limited resources to understand in real-time the health risks that may exist when they conduct underwater duties everything from fleet maintenance and repairs to search and rescue and research missions. The most reliable water testing technologies typically rely on lab-based analysis of samples and scientists knowing which microbes to screen. But with dynamic weather, currents, water temperatures, and sewage and pollution factors, the exact condition of water, particularly of coastal water, at a specific time is hard to predict.

By the time a water sample arrives at a lab and is tested, the conditions may have changed, said Dr. Samuel Dorevitch, associate professor of environmental and occupational health sciences at the School of Public Health and co-principal investigator. If Navy divers had real-time information, they could select the best protective equipment, dive duration and take other measures to prevent the various health issues, like heat stress or gastrointestinal, skin, and respiratory infections that may result from microbes in water.

Thats where a new approach using artificial intelligence can make a difference.

Artificial intelligence offers a way to synthesize a vast amount of information quickly for a specific calculation and this technology, if we can bring it to fruition, provides an opportunity for us to improve the tools available to the Navy, said Isabel Cruz, distinguished professor of computer science at the College of Engineering and co-principal investigator.

The researchers hope that they can develop a system that can be used in any location by divers to analyze water conditions through a combination of user-provided and web-based information and human data, such as the age of the divers, their health, and the size of the diving team.

This project is both exciting and challenging because of its multidimensionality, Cruz said. We hope to pull information from many sources that offer different types of data, and we will have to integrate data that are quite complex, heterogeneous, and often without metadata. We will build the artificial intelligence and machine learning methods in stages, and if we can teach our system to reliably and accurately filter and prioritize all these data for risk prediction, I think we will have something remarkable.

If we could provide divers or their commanders with a handheld device or app to evaluate the ever-changing ecosystem of a particular body of water and any potential health risks at the time they enter the water, they would be better able to plan their mission for optimal health and safety, Dorevitch said. For those in the Navy, getting in the water is not optional and anything we can do to aid quick, data-driven decision-making for mitigating health risk is beneficial.

Charlie Catlett, senior research scientist at Discovery Partners Institute, is a co-investigator. The grant, which started May 16, will support this research fortwo years.

See the rest here:

Computer Science, Environmental Health Experts at UIC Team Up to Protect US Navy Divers with AI - Newswise

Iowa State part of U.S. National Science Foundation newly established artificial intelligence research institute on cyberinfrastructure – College of…

ISU Professor Hongwei Zhang is leading the edge wireless component of the ICICLE project. (Christopher Gannon/Iowa State University)

The U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF) announced the establishment of 11 new NSF National Artificial Intelligence Research Institutes including one led by Iowa State University building on the first round of seven institutes funded in 2020. The combined investment of $220 million expands the reach of those institutes to include a total of 40 states and the District of Columbia.

One of the 11 institutes, called the AI Institute for Intelligent Cyberinfrastructure with Computational Learning in the Environment (ICICLE), is led by The Ohio State University, with Iowa State Professor Hongwei Zhang of the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering leading the edge wireless component of that project.

ICICLE will build the next generation of cyberinfrastructure that will make AI easy for scientists to use and promote its further democratization. It will transform the AI landscape of today by bringing in scientists from multidisciplinary backgrounds to create a robust, trustworthy and transparent national cyberinfrastructure that is ready to plug-and-play in areas of societal importance, such as smart foodsheds, precision agriculture and animal ecology. The institute will develop a new generation of the workforce, with sustained diversity and inclusion at all levels. This institute is fully funded by NSF.

Dhabaleswar K. Panda, professor of computer science and engineering at Ohio State, is the principal investigator for ICICLE, leading a core team of 46 academic researchers and staff scientists from 13 organizations, including Zhang from ISU. The institute will build the next generation of cyberinfrastructure with a goal of making AI data and infrastructure more accessible to the larger society.

The Ohio State ICICLE team will work in collaboration with the Ohio Supercomputer Center, Case Western Reserve University, Iowa State University, Indiana University, University of Wisconsin-Madison, University of Texas-Austin/Texas Advanced Computing Center, University of Utah, University of Delaware, University of California, San Diego/San Diego Supercomputer Center, University of California, Davis, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and IC-FOODS.

More information about ICICLE can be found at https://icicle.ai.

Learn more about theNSF AI Institutes by visitingnsf.gov.

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Iowa State part of U.S. National Science Foundation newly established artificial intelligence research institute on cyberinfrastructure - College of...

College majors with the greatest gender disparities | Personal-finance | tulsaworld.com – Tulsa World

Gender disparities persist in college majors, then trickle down to careers, whether in computer science and electrical engineering, or nursing and teaching. Some progress has been made in encouraging more women to enter male-dominated fields and to close gaps in wages. Computer programming is one example where the wage gap has shrunk since 2016. But in other cases, inequities persist: 50% of women leave tech jobs by the time they are 35 years old.

As for the reverse, women continue to dominate in careers such as nursing or teaching, but often men in those fields earn more than women. Women in government public health jobs make $3,000 less than men in the same positions, or men in special education jobs out earn women by $2,400.

StudySoupcompiled data from theNational Center for Education Statistics to identify 15 college majors with the greatest gender disparities. The data is submitted by all U.S. colleges participating in the Title IV federal financial aid program, with 201718 being the most recent year available. StudySoup removed majors with less than 5,000 students, leaving just over 1,000 disciplines in the dataset.

StudySoup recognizes the data collected views gender through a binary lens, which does not accurately represent all gender identities. A recent study estimates about 1.2 million adults in the U.S. identify as nonbinary, a population not explored in the collected data set.

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College majors with the greatest gender disparities | Personal-finance | tulsaworld.com - Tulsa World

Associate Professor/Professor, School of Electronics and Computer Science job with UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHAMPTON | 261074 – Times Higher Education (THE)

School of Electronics & Computer Science

Location: Highfield CampusSalary: Competitive: Salary will be commensurate with qualifications and experience (Level 6 to Level 7)Full Time PermanentClosing Date: Sunday 29 August 2021Interview Date: To be confirmedReference: 1440421FP

Associate Professor/ Professor

Shape the future. Starting with your own.

Imagine working in an environment where your contribution is so far reaching that you will be changing the world - this is reality - if you choose.

Pursue your research interests and inspire the next generation with a boundary-pushing University.

ECS is marking its 75th Anniversary with a strategic investment into Computer Science.

Are you an expert in one of the following areas?

Whether you are an established academic who currently holds an equivalent position, or a successful colleague who seek the opportunity to step up to a more senior role, or who returns to work after a career break, the University of Southampton is the place to do something truly unique with your expertise.

Join us, and youll have the scope to create your own opportunities. For example, one of our colleagues came to us in 2017 with an industrial research background. Since then shes built a strong publishing record, mentored students as a senior tutor and been awarded a research council grant. With our support, shes directed her own progress and is also leading a new Centre for Healthcare Technology research - working with hospital clinicians and electronics experts to shape the next generation of healthcare. She was promoted to a Professor at the start of 2021.

Ranked in the top 1% of universities worldwide, were bold, progressive and keen to push the boundaries of what were teaching our students - and what were learning alongside them. So we encourage and support our lecturers to pursue their research and other activity within their fields of interest. After all, when everyone brings and shares their own ideas and findings, it helps us to stay at the forefront of thinking in electronics and computer science. With major sector Centres for Machine Intelligence, Healthcare Technologies and Internet of Things, and the Academic Centre of Excellence for Cyber Security Research and Teaching, our reputation for teaching, research and enterprise is quite exceptional.

To apply, youll need a PhD, or equivalent professional qualifications, with a strong publication record, and able to demonstrate delivery of teaching in a manner that meaningfully engages students. It is essential that you have a track-record of innovative research in Computer Science and have a desire to build a strong research team with the support of the School.

Athena SWAN bronze award recognised, were committed to improving equality for women in science and engineering, so well help you find a good work-life balance with flexible or even part-time working hours, with a workload adjusted accordingly. ECS provides a unique, friendly and supportive environment. We have a range of staff development programmes and a unique mentoring and wellbeing scheme. We strongly recommend that you visit https://www.ecs.soton.ac.uk/workinghere and https://talentedu.com/ecs/ to find out more about working in ECS.

This is an exciting place to work and shape your future, and the future of the next generation of Computer Scientist.

And, with access to onsite childcare facilities and a childcare vouchers scheme, our comprehensive benefits package also includes a contributory pension scheme, generous holiday allowance, subsidised health and fitness facilities, a cycle-to-work scheme and a range of discounts.

The University of Southampton is committed to sustainability and being a globally responsible university and has been awarded the Platinum EcoAward.

For more information about the opportunities you could create with us, please contact: Professor Adriane Chapman, Co-Director of Centre for Healthcare Technologies Adriane.Chapman@soton.ac.uk or Professor Paul Lewin, Head of ECS HoD@ecs.soton.ac.uk

Application Procedure

You should submit your completed online application form at https://jobs.soton.ac.uk. The application deadline will be midnight on the closing date stated above. Please submit details for 3 referees and include your CV and publication list with your application. If you need any assistance, please call Kate Pounds (Recruitment Team) on +44 (0) 23 8059 5456, or email recruitment@soton.ac.uk. Please quote reference 1440421FP on all correspondence.

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Associate Professor/Professor, School of Electronics and Computer Science job with UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHAMPTON | 261074 - Times Higher Education (THE)

WSU will lead effort to apply artificial intelligence to farming – The Columbian

Washington State University will lead a new federally funded research institute to take the agriculture industry further into the future via artificial intelligence.

The USDA-NIFA Institute for Agricultural AI for Transforming Workforce and Decision Support also known as the AgAID Institute will look at how AI can help tackle farming challenges related to climate change, weather, water supply and labor.

To that end, WSU researchers will lead a coalition of colleges and universities as well as private-sector partners through the AgAID Institute, which will be funded through a five-year, $20 million U.S. Department of Agriculture grant.

We also know that agriculture has entered in some ways a new era. Its what some people talk about as Agriculture 4.0, said WSU professor Ananth Kalyanaraman, director of the AgAID Institute. Its almost an evolution that is needed in agriculture to tackle some of the 21st-century challenges.

AgAID is one of 11 new AI research institutes announced Thursday by the National Science Foundation.

The University of Washington will lead another: The NSF AI Institute for Dynamic Systems will focus on AI innovations with real-time learning and control of complex dynamic systems, which describe chaotic situations caused by constantly shifting conditions, according to the university.

Some of our specific questions include: Can we develop better machine-learning technologies by baking in and enforcing known physics, such as conservation laws, symmetries, etc.? institute associate director Steve Brunton, a UW associate professor of mechanical engineering, said in a statement. Similarly, in complex systems where we only have partially known or unknown physics such as neuroscience or epidemiology can we use machine learning to learn the physics of these systems?

Kalyanaraman, a professor with WSUs School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, will lead the AgAID Institute.

Partners with the institute include Oregon State University; the University of California, Merced; the University of Virginia; Carnegie Mellon University; Heritage University; Wenatchee Valley College; Kansas State University; IBM Research; and the start-up innov8.ag.

Kalyanaraman said WSU first formed an internal team of computer science researchers and agricultural stakeholders a few years ago to look into the perceptions and practical applications of AI with farming. The team then grew with external entities, including a number of the institutes partnering universities.

These partnerships incidentally put the coalition in prime position when the National Science Foundation put out a call for proposals with the research institute initiative last year, Kalyanaraman said.

One of the focuses of the institute will be education programs from K-12 through higher education and worker training. Kalyanaraman also said much of the institutes initial years will be spent working directly with stakeholders in the agricultural industry essentially the end users of these systems to determine their needs and practical restraints.

Its one thing to have AI tools and design AI tools to work in lab settings, he said, but its a completely different beast when we talk about transferring AI to work while in the field.

AI, Kalyanaraman said, can help farm managers better forecast the availability of water and allocate that supply in smart ways to prevent significant losses. He said such innovations can also help farmers better predict the weather and plan for extreme weather.

How can you take the data that is being generated and convert that into some kind of actionable knowledge to make real-time decisions? Kalyanaraman said. That is where AI comes in.

Labor, meanwhile, is another challenge particularly with specialty crops such as apples, cherries, mint and almonds that require skill-intensive processes. Specialty crops account for 87 percent of the U.S. agricultural workforce, according to the university.

As an example, Kalyanaraman said an AI-driven device could guide a farm worker in pruning crops with adroitness.

But dont expect robots to manage these specialty crops anytime soon.

A machine simply cant substitute the human on the farm, Kalyanaraman said. Farmworkers are an integral part of the chain, and they will continue to be. Except now with machines, we can help train them better and also have some degree of automation in the sense that guidance is possible.

U.S. Sens. Maria Cantwell and Patty Murray, both Washington Democrats, lauded Thursdays announcement.

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WSU will lead effort to apply artificial intelligence to farming - The Columbian

Teacher seeks funding for bookworm vending machine to promote literacy and reward students for good behavior – Atlanta Journal Constitution

Students that exhibit the standards are rewarded with points to spend as they wish in their classroom stores, the school store and during reward days. With that in mind, White started a drive to fund a bookworm vending machine, known as Inchy.

Reading comes across every academic area and your personal life. Its so ingrained in everything we do. You have to be able to read to do math, to do science, to learn history and social studies.

With the kids that we have I thought it would be a great way to encourage not just good behavior, but literacy as well when you can go to a machine, pick a book that you want and take it home because a lot of these students dont have access to books at home, the computer science teacher said.

Funding for Whites project would continue the opportunity to provide additional incentives that touch many lifes cornerstones and is open until Aug. 25.

The bookworm vending machine will allow me to continue to diversify the ways that we acknowledge and reward our students, said Rawls.

To donate, visit https://www.donorschoose.org/project/promoting-good-behavior-and-literacy-wit/5501977/

Each Sunday we write about a deserving person or charity events such as fun-runs, volunteer projects and other community gatherings that benefit a good cause. To submit a story for us to cover, send to ajc.doinggood@gmail.com.

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Teacher seeks funding for bookworm vending machine to promote literacy and reward students for good behavior - Atlanta Journal Constitution

University announces fall 2020, spring 2021 graduates | The University of Kansas – KU Today

LAWRENCE The names of more than 5,700 graduates at the University of Kansas for fall 2020 and spring 2021 have been announced by the University Registrar. A ceremony for 2020 and 2021 graduates took place May 23. See the video celebrating both classes.

A list of fall 2020 and spring 2021 graduates is below. Names of summer 2020 graduates were previously published.

Note: Not all graduates have made their name and hometown information publicly available. Those students can email kunews@ku.edu if they would like their information included. Learn more about KU hometown news.

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

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The University of Kansas is a major comprehensive research and teaching university. The university's mission is to lift students and society by educating leaders, building healthy communities and making discoveries that change the world. The KU News Service is the central public relations office for the Lawrence campus.

kunews@ku.edu | 1450 Jayhawk Blvd., Suite 37, Lawrence, KS 66045

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University announces fall 2020, spring 2021 graduates | The University of Kansas - KU Today

UTC Center For Urban Informatics And Progress Awarded $1.37M Grant From National Science Foundation – The Chattanoogan

Researchers at the University of Tennessee at Chattanoogas Center for Urban Informatics and Progress have been awarded a $1.37 million grant from the National Science Foundation.The funds will create Smart Corridor+ along a section of the existing M.L. King Boulevard Smart Corridor, a 1.2-mile stretch in downtown Chattanooga used by CUIP to study traffic flow, public safety and transportation, environmental impacts and other quality-of-life issues.Through an online portal, researchers from around the world will be able to study Smart Corridor+ through video, high-speed internet connectivity, computer analysis, performance-measuring tools, continuously updated data and other technology to reduce pedestrian injuries and coordinate autonomous and connected vehicles.Smart Corridor+ is a major step forward for Chattanoogas Smart City research community, said Kevin Comstock, director of Smart City for Chattanooga.

The city will be able to offer state-of-the-art research technologies to the nations top Smart City researchers. Its a huge win for everyone involved, he said.The National Science Foundation grant also provides funds to expand the existing MLK Smart Corridor to include a portion of U.S. 27 and its on and off ramps.In addition, Smart Corridor+ will be available to high school students in the Chattanooga area, growing education in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM).CUIP works with university and laboratory researchers across the country, and Smart Corridor+ gives it the capability to collaborate with even more.We have been working toward this for some time now, and it wouldnt have happened without our close collaboration with the city of Chattanooga, EPB and The Enterprise Center, said CUIP Director Mina Sartipi.Securing funding for this initiative is exciting. We want Chattanooga to advance as a hub for smart and connected community research and development, she said.Once implemented, Smart Corridor+ will support growing computer science, engineering and Smart City research in Chattanooga.CUIP keeps Chattanooga on the cutting edge of smart community work, said Enterprise Center President Deb Socia. The Enterprise Center is glad to be a partner, helping to ensure that the voice of the community is represented as our city continues to embrace the opportunities that this testbed enables.David Wade, EPB president and CEO, calls Smart Corridor+ another major step in the effort to utilize Chattanoogas Smart City infrastructure to research and pioneer solutions that can enhance quality of life for the people in our community.This effort exemplifies how smart infrastructure can serve as a platform for innovation that can really make a difference in peoples lives in terms public safety, improved traffic flow, positive environmental impacts and more, he said.

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UTC Center For Urban Informatics And Progress Awarded $1.37M Grant From National Science Foundation - The Chattanoogan