Category Archives: Engineering

Mechanical Aerospace Engineering | University of Southampton

Modules in the first 2 years focus on the fundamentals of mechanical engineering. Youll gain the skills to apply your theoretical understanding to a wide range of real design problems.

In years 3 and 4 you'll extend your knowledge and skills by taking part in both individual and group projects.

You can select specialist modules in aerospace systems and engineering.

You'll take part in our award-winning induction programme and gain practical experience. Teams of new students work together to design and create. For example, you could take apart and put back together a 4 stroke engine.

The first year provides a background in engineering science, emphasising the mechanical engineering aspects. This includes a workshop training course.

Core modules cover topics such as:

You'll develop your design and programming skills, preparing you to design, build and test engineering systems, components and mechanisms.

You'll explore the main mechanical engineering subjects with tailored modules. This includes topics such as:

You'll also take part in a challenging design project, such as designing an autonomous robot or quadcopter.

You can apply to spend a semester abroad at the end of the year. We have several partner institutions that teach modules in English.

You'll undertake an individual project that usually takes the form of a design or research exercise.

You'll specialise in aerospace systems, with a mix of compulsory and optional modules including:

You'll take part in a group design project, these are often linked to current research activities or topics that have practical relevance to industry. You'll apply your conceptual engineering and scientific knowledge to an engineering design problem.

As a team, you'll develop your ideas through detailed design, experimentation, computer modelling and manufacture.

You'll study aircraft propulsion, and will also choose from optional modules, such as:

hypersonic flows

aircraft structures

Want more detail?See all the modules in the course.

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Mechanical Aerospace Engineering | University of Southampton

Mechanical Automotive Engineering | University of Southampton

Modules in the first 2 years explore the fundamentals of mechanical engineering. Youll gain the skills to apply your theoretical understanding to a wide range of real design problems.

In years 3 and 4, you'll extend your knowledge and skills by taking part in both individual and group projects. You'll take specialist modules in automotive systems and engineering.

You'll take part in our award-winning induction programme and gain practical experience. Teams of new students work together to design and create. For example, you could take apart and put back together a 4 stroke engine.

The first year provides a background in engineering science, emphasising the mechanical engineering aspects. This includes a workshop training course.

Core modules cover topics such as:

You'll develop your design and programming skills, preparing you to design, build and test engineering systems, components and mechanisms.

You'll explore the main mechanical engineering subjects with tailored modules. This includes topics such as:

materials and structures

drives and machines

vibration

You'll also take part in a challenging design project, such as designing an autonomous robot or quadcopter.

You can apply to spend a semester abroad at the end of the year. We have several partner institutions that teach modules in English.

You'll undertake an individual project that usually takes the form of a design or research exercise.

You'll specialise in automotive engineering and study topics including:

manufacturing and materials

automotive power train and chassis systems

heat transfer and applications

automotive mechatronics

You'll also choose from a range of optional modules to focus or broaden your knowledge.

You'll take part in a group design project, these are often linked to current research activities or topics that have practical relevance to industry. You'll apply your conceptual engineering and scientific knowledge to an engineering design problem.

As a team, you'll develop your ideas through detailed design, experimentation, computer modelling and manufacture.

Youll have the option to study advanced topics, including:

Want more detail?See all the modules in the course.

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Mechanical Automotive Engineering | University of Southampton

Propulsion & Engine Systems Engineering | University of …

The Course Description Document details your course overview, your course structure and how your course is taught and assessed.

Although the COVID-19 situation is improving, any future restrictions could mean we might have to change the way parts of our teaching and learning take place in 2021 to 2022. We're working hard to plan for a number of possible scenarios. This means that some of the information on this course page may be subject to change.

Find out more on our COVID advice page.

See the original post:

Propulsion & Engine Systems Engineering | University of ...

Electronic Engineering | MEng | University of Southampton

The year 1 and 2 modules are similar across all our Electronic Engineering courses and provide a grounding in essential engineering topics.

In years 3 and 4, you can follow your interests by choosing modules from a wide range of options. You can also choose modules from other subject areas.

Youll work in high-spec electronics and computer labs, equipped with the latest technology, hardware and software.

In the first year, youll study digital systems, and electrical materials and fields. There are core modules in:

mathematics

physics

electronics

programming

We'll develop your practical skills with extensive laboratory classes. In your first semester youll get to build processing boards.

Compulsory modules will explore:

electrical materials

circuitry

programming

communications

You'll choose from optional modules, covering topics such as:

photonics

semiconductors

computer engineering

At the end of the year, you'll complete a 3-week team challenge, judged by an industry panel. Previous projects include the development of a home AI system and building a quadcopter.

Youll also design a microchip for manufacture and test the finished product.

This year, youll complete a unique piece of individual research. This will typically involve designing, building and testing a new electronic system. For some students it can even lead to their first published scientific paper.

A module in engineering management and law will give you the professional skills needed to pursue a career in a large company, or start your own venture.

You'll choose from optional modules covering topics, such as:

robotic systems

green electronics

digital control systems

You can also choose to:

The main group design project is a great opportunity to experience working for an industry or academic customer. Past projects have involved:

Youll also select from optional modules covering topics, such as:

You can apply to spend the second semester studying abroad at a partner institution.

Want more detail?See all the modules in the course.

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Electronic Engineering | MEng | University of Southampton

Optical Fibre & Photonic Engineering | University of …

Through this optical fibre course, you'll gain specialist knowledge of technologies that harness the power of light, such as lasers and optical fibres. You'll also master the engineering skills and business insight to apply your knowledge in this growth sector.

In 2017 we were awarded a Queens Anniversary Prize for Higher and Further Education, in recognition of our world-leading expertise in photonics and fibre optic technology.

If you've got a passion for physics and engineering materials, but want to keep your job opportunities open, this optics and photonics engineering course will allow you to explore both. Many of our students go on to study for a PhD, but many also go into industry, or set up their own business.

Youll be part ofan active, research-focused, postgraduate-only community; the largest photonics group in the UK. You'll also havea rare opportunity to see firsthand how fibres are made, as wereone of only a handful of universities with optical fibre production facilities.

During this MSc degree, you'll make photonic components and devices in ournew 1,200m2 cleanroom complex. This is thelargest multidisciplinary cleanroom of its type in the UK.

Our inventions can be found on the Moon, on Mars and on the International Space Station. We built the foundations of the internet and our research is powering changes in medicine, telecommunications, defence, renewable energy and manufacturing.

Some of the best photonics researchers in the world will support you to develop your research skills and youll gain hands-on experience of the many practical applications of optical fibres and photonics engineering.

You'll gainpractical insights into how to run a modern photonics business through our Industrial Showcase Week. During the week youll visit several businesses and learn from experienced photonics business leaders how to apply research and engineering skills to real-world problems.

Well foster your entrepreneurial spirit, helping you develop your ideas and connect with mentors and investors; 11 spin-out companies have so far been developed from our Optical Research Centre.

Bill Brocklesbystarted in research at the ClarendonLaboratory in Oxford, working on laser spectroscopy. He worked as a post-doctoral member of Technical Staff at AT&T Bell laboratories. His research has centred around novel imaging & microscopy techniques in the visible and XUV spectral regions over the last 10-15 years. He is currentlyworking on coherent diffractive imaging of nanoscale systems using XUV radiation generated by high-power ultrashort pulse lasers.

Dr Brocklesby was Project Manager of the ICANproject, conceived by Grard Mourou and Toshiki Tajima, which studied large-scale beam combination of ultrafast fibre lasers for wake-field acceleration. Large-scale beam combination remains a topic of interest.

He alsohas extensive research experience in:

The Course Description Document details your course overview, your course structure and how your course is taught and assessed.

Although the COVID-19 situation is improving, any future restrictions could mean we might have to change the way parts of our teaching and learning take place in 2021 to 2022. We're working hard to plan for a number of possible scenarios. This means that some of the information on this course page may be subject to change.

Find out more on our COVID advice page.

Visit link:

Optical Fibre & Photonic Engineering | University of ...

Mechatronics | MSc | University of Southampton

This Advanced Mechanical Engineering Science masters in mechatronicscombines electrical, mechanical and computer engineering.Youll learn to design and build using advanced electrical systems.

Our masters courses combine traditional aspects of mechanical engineering with specialisms from other areas, so you canadapt your study to your career plans. Our internationalcentrefor research and teachinghas a global reputation.

Our MScMechatronicsmasters degreeis for you if you studied engineering,mathsor physical sciences, and want tospecialisein mechatronics.

On thiscourseyoull learn the fundamental science, methods, analysis and engineering applications to start a career in mechatronic engineering.Youll have the opportunity to design robots and build machinesas part of your study.

Youll learn about mechanical engineering, electrical systems and control.As part ofthis MSc in mechatronics,youll selectoptional moduleson topicslikerobotics and automotive propulsion.

Well teach youto use advanced electrical systems and understand the impact and use of control systems, instrumentation and sensors.

Youlllearn fromacademicsat the forefront of their fields,they teachthe latest intechnology advancements.Youll also receive guidance and support from ourElectro-Mechanical Engineering Research Group.Studying at Southamptongivesyouaccess toa global network of companies, shared facilities and specialist expertise to enhance your learning.

This course is led by Professor John Atkinson.John is aProfessor of Engineering Scienceandeditor in chief of the scientific journalMicroelectronics International.Learn more by visitingProfessorAtkinsonsstaff profile.

We offer 3 other pathways on this Advanced Mechanical Engineering degree. Your other options are in:

This master's programme is accredited by the Institution of Mechanical Engineers (IMechE) as meeting the academic requirement for Further Learning, for Chartered Engineer registration. Candidates must hold a BEng/BSc undergraduate first degree that is accredited for Chartered Engineer (CEng) registration to comply with full CEng registration requirements.

The Course Description Document details your course overview, your course structure and how your course is taught and assessed.

Although the COVID-19 situation is improving, any future restrictions could mean we might have to change the way parts of our teaching and learning take place in 2021 to 2022. We're working hard to plan for a number of possible scenarios. This means that some of the information on this course page may be subject to change.

Find out more on our COVID advice page.

See the original post:

Mechatronics | MSc | University of Southampton

Aeronautics and Astronautics | BEng | University of …

The first 2 years are the same across our Aeronautics and Astronautics degrees. They focus on core aerospaceengineering science.

The course has the perfect balance between theory and practice, with several opportunities for practical engineering experience.

You will visit industry and research establishments and learn workshop training and research techniques.

You'll take an induction programme with all our Aeronautics and Astronautics students. This will give you your first practical experience and the opportunity to get to know your fellow students.

We'll develop your design and programming skills and teach you to build and test engineering systems, components and mechanisms.

You'll also learn manufacturing skills in our workshops so that you can make your ideas a reality.

Core modules include topics such as:

aircraft operations and flight mechanics

design and computing

electrical and electronic systems

mathematics

thermofluids

mechanics, materials and structures

You'll build on your core knowledge from the first year, and increases your focus on Aeronautics and Astronautics disciplines. Compulsory modules include:

aerodynamics

astronautics

mechanics of flight

propulsion

These modules feature hands-on teaching, using facilities such as our wind tunnels, turbojet and rocket engine.

Youll take a systems design and computing module, and participate in a team project to design, create and test a robot, drone, responsive system or other device.

At the end of the second semester youll take a flight test course, in which experiments are performed on board a Jetstream aircraft.

You'll deepen your understanding of aircraft design, including their environmental impacts. Core modules include:

You'll chooseoptional modules from topics including:

You'll carry out an individual research project using many of the concepts that you've learnt over the previous 2 years. For example, students have investigated how to deflect asteroids, use 3D-printedmetal jet engines, design Formula-1 race-cars and build bio-inspired unmanned air vehicles.

Want more detail?See all the modules in the course.

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Aeronautics and Astronautics | BEng | University of ...

Group Design Project | FEEG6013 | University of Southampton

Teaching and learning methods

The main element will be regular meetings, preferably weekly but could be less often, as agreed by all parties between the project supervisors and the students. Initially, these meetings will be used to define the details of the projects and then to review the progress of the group.

An initial meeting with the students and the project coordinator will help to clarify the objectives and methods of assessment of the projects.

Depending on the project and her/his role in the team, each student could be involved in a wide range of learning activities. The following elements will be common:

Self-directed study: given the size of the projects, you may be responsible for several sub-tasks. This could include consulting relevant textbooks and researching papers, consulting members of academic staff for technical support, writing computer programs, and liaising with technicians, external companies or clients. As part of this process you should maintain an individual design journal, where you record and work on ideas, summarise information and results, outline future directions, etc., using text and sketches or other illustrations as appropriate. The journal could be kept either in the form of a notebook or electronically.)

Group-led work: you will have to synthesise and report your work to the other group members to contribute to the discussions and decision making within the group. Team work will also include organising the project, distributing the tasks between the students and coordinating these tasks.

Reporting: During regular meetings with the supervisors, the students will present their current work. At regular intervals, the students will submit Design Journal Entries summarising their work since the submission of the previous Entry. These Entries will form the basis of the next supervisory meeting. At the end of the first term a presentation describing the project plan and progress of the group will be delivered by each group to the supervisors, project coordinator or external industry sponsor. At the end of the year in May each group will submit a report, a video and a final presentation. Each student will also submit an individual Design Journal Summary, consisting of a summary of his/her contribution to the project with reference to the Design Journal Entries submitted in the course of the year. Each group will deliver their final presentation in early June, during a dedicated event.

Optionally, students may take part in the "Elevator Pitch" to apply for additional funding for the project, also developing further and improving their presentation skills.

Students will be supported by their supervisory team during the project. They should make sure that they use meetings with him or her effectively. It is up to them to also make good use of all resources available within the Faculty and the University.

Potential resources. The projects within this module are diverse and are supported by a wide range of potential resources, including Design Studios and workshops, time allocated within specialist laboratories and testing facilities, and specialist software. Each project group is allocated a budget which can be spent to support the project (e.g. materials for manufacture, travel), as well as time within our Engineering, Design and Manufacturing Centre (EDMC) for the production of professionally manufactured components. Many projects have additional sponsorship from industry.You will be given a budget that you must manage to deliver your design to cost. Each project qualifies for funding at a level determined by the core project funding and the number of students in each group. Funds will cover the costs of travel expenses, materials and hospitality for project sponsors. This budget per GDP is, for 2018/19, 300 plus 80 per student. Each group should appoint a treasurer who is responsible for ensuring that the budget is properly managed. Teams who exceed their budget will be expected to settle the difference personally. With the exception of funds awarded via a successful bid to the elevator pitch, no additional Faculty funding will be available, except in extreme and unavoidable circumstances.

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Group Design Project | FEEG6013 | University of Southampton

Boeing to support Wisk with engineering and certification expertise – Flightglobal

Air taxi developer Wisk Aero has made clear that Boeings backing extends well beyond financing to also include engineering, safety and certification support.

California-based Wisk revealed a few details on 24 January about its relationship with Boeing and said it intends this year to pick the location of new production site.

Its not just capital, it is also the resources they bring to bear, having certified many aircraft, Wisk chief executive Gary Gysin says of Boeings support. Its a joint development effort.

Gysin cites Boeings experience with certification and engineering, saying Boeing is integrated into our team.

His comments came shortly after Wisk disclosed on 24 January that it secured $450 million in funding from Boeing funds adding to previous investment of undisclosed amount by the airframer in Wisk. Boeing became a Wisk backer in 2019.

Privately held Wisk has not disclosed other details about its financing. But Gysin says bringing an electric air taxi through certification and into service costs about $1.5 billion. Boeings latest capital injection is about one third of that amount.

Boeing will bring its certification experience to bear in helping Wisks all-electric aircraft clear the Federal Aviation Administrations certification review, says Boeing vice-president and chief engineer of sustainability and future mobility Brian Yutko.

Support for Wisk will also come from Boeing subsidiary Aurora Flight Sciences, which specialises in developing autonomous flight technology, Yutko adds.

Gysin and Yutko spoke to reporters but provided few details about Wisks plans. The company is developing an electric vertical take-off and landing (eVTOL) aircraft for what the sectors proponents describe as a massive market opportunity. They envision networks of air taxis flying short routes within the worlds most-congested cities.

Some Wisk competitors names like Archer Aviation and Joby Aviation have promised to have electric air taxis in service within just a few years.

Wisk stands out in having disclosed no such details. As for a timeline, Gysin says only that Wisk will reach certification when regulators are convinced its design is safe.

You can debate which year, but this is going to happen, he adds.

Gysin also declines to reveal details about Wisks envisioned production aircraft, saying only it will be larger and fly farther than Wisks prototype, called Cora. That aircraft has 22nm (40km) range and speed of about 87kt (161km/h).

But Wisk is closing in on picking a site to manufacturer its commercial air taxi.

We will be deciding this year where we will do our high-rate manufacturing, Gysin says.

Aerospace analysts view production capability and efficiency as factors that will make or break nascent air taxi developers. To keep production costs (and sales prices) low, the companies must develop efficient production systems and produce their aircraft at relatively high rates.

Wisks plan calls for it to have 2,000 of its air taxis flying within five years of certification, Gysin says. At least initially, Wisk will also operate the aircraft.

Link:

Boeing to support Wisk with engineering and certification expertise - Flightglobal

Engineering grad takes aerospace interest to NASA | Nebraska Today | University of NebraskaLincoln – Nebraska Today

Editors Note This is part of a conversation series highlighting outstanding Husker alumni on the University of NebraskaLincolns Medium page. Today, were featuring Taylor Winkelmann-Kerl. After a trip to the Strategic Air and Space Museum in elementary school, Winkelmann-Kerl was determined to become a rocket scientist. She came to Nebraska as a mechanical engineer searching for aerospace experience, and immersed herself in the aerospace field, gaining experience through undergraduate research and Aerospace Club. Today, that interest in aerospace has turned into a career as she works on the NASA Power PropulsionElement.

When I was in elementary school, we took a field trip to the Strategic Air and Space Museum that blew my mind. I remember looking at my dad at the end of the day (who had chaperoned) and telling him I was going to be a rocket scientist. Ever since then, I was the odd kid who set the goal and didnt waiver from it. I honestly cant remember ever wanting to be anything else. Im lucky that even once I learned what it actually meant to be an aerospace engineer, that I still enjoyed it and wanted to pursue it further. Im even more fortunate that the dream still lives on now that Im in theindustry.

The skills and experience I got from the Aerospace Club prepared me more than anything else for what its like in the industry world. The academic principles that we learned in class surely set great foundations and taught me ways to think about problems, but the actual application and execution of those academic endeavors came through in my extracurricular activities. When I started my job, I already had years of experience presenting to NASA design review boards due to the Aerospace Club and USIP, though I understand now that those review boards were much kinder to undergrad students than they are in real life. Ha! But in all seriousness, I had a jump start at understanding expectations and how to ask and answer questions in those crucial situations that every design engineer has to go through at some point, which has helped me set myself apart from mypeers.

My current role is acting as the Deputy Program Manager for Propulsion Development on the NASA Power Propulsion Element (PPE). PPE is one spacecraft of many that will create the lunar gateway, which will act as a space station around the moon. Gateway is a key component of the NASA Artemis mission that will put the first woman on the lunar surface and set our foundation to send humans to Mars. As the name indicates, PPE will provide the primary propulsion and power systems for all of gateway. We are developing the highest power electric propulsion system ever built to get to the moon and keep us in a stable orbit, paired with a state-of-the-art chemical propulsion system for agile control of the gateway stack. On top of that, the entire system will be refuelable for longevity and as a demonstration of the technology that will propel humans to Mars. My role is to guide the technical progress and execution for the entire propulsion and refuelingsystems.

Ive always thought that outreach and mentorship were highly valuable. Its always nice to have a friendly face to bounce ideas off of and its important to hear from people who live and breathe the thing that you are working to learn more about or better yourself in. Its even more important to have diverse groups of people in that mentorship network so that you can find someone you resonate with. I was/am always looking from folks to learn from and I think that its important to give that back. You never know when you might spark something great forsomeone.

I was totally shocked when I got the notification and honestly felt quite a bit of imposter syndrome. I work with so many brilliant people, both young and wise, whom I deeply respect. I have so much to learn from them and often look to some of my peers and think wow, I hope I can be more like you. So to hear that they recognized me as a leader was so humbling, exciting, and reassuring that Im on the rightpath.

It sounds harsh, but I learned to be OK with people underestimating me during my undergrad and I have to address that same sentiment nearly every day in my work life. As a young woman, young engineer, and young program manager, I often get talked over or dismissed in an aggressive and predominantly white male industry. What matters most is to keep working, keep pushing, and keep pursuing the passion because at the end of the day folks will come around and it will have been worthit.

Karen Stelling was (and still is) an adviser to the Aerospace Club that made a massive impact on my life. Karen was the type of mentor I needed. She came from industry; she knew what life was like outside of academia, and could provide real life context to problem-solving. She was a leader, a woman in the field, and genuinely, a kind and approachable person. She taught me so much about acknowledging that there are different versions of success, learning how to lead people and technical progress. I could go on and on I look back on my time at Nebraska and the story would not be complete withoutKaren.

You have to get involved outside of the classroom. There is so much more to being a productive teammate and human outside of college than academic excellence! Find something that fuels you and allows you to grow in other areas besides your books. Itll boost your resume, make your life easier down the road, and hopefully, you will have some fun while youre atit.

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Engineering grad takes aerospace interest to NASA | Nebraska Today | University of NebraskaLincoln - Nebraska Today