Category Archives: Deep Mind

BetMGM Has Crazy 100-1 Odds On The Yankees or Nats To Go Deep Tonight – Crossing Broad

Baseball is back in full swing this weekend, and as sports action heats back up, BetMGM is offering a promo that stands out above the rest.

As the Yankees and Nationals resume their season-opening series in Washington tonight, bettors in states such as New Jersey, Colorado, and Indiana will want to make sure they dont miss out on this no-brainer offer. If either team goes deep, BetMGM is paying out $100 on a $1 bet. You read that correctlythats a +10000 payout on either team to hit a home run.

Click here to get BetMGM and bet $1 to win $100 on the Yankees or Nationals to hit a home run tonight.

Tonights pitching matchup between James Paxton and Stephen Strasburg figures to be a good one, but its still overwhelmingly likely that the Yankees or Nationals hit a homer tonight. With guys like Aaron Judge and Giancarlo Stanton on the field, its always a good bet to bank on a long ball (or three). Thats why theres so much value with the BetMGM promo.

And the best part is that in order to grab this stellar, no string attached promo, it requires only a $1 wager to cash in on a $100 payout. Thats return on investment.

Note: You can also grab the Yankees to win and score at least six runs at a boosted +400 payout (was +300).

Keep in mind that last season the Yankees knocked 306 homers, trailing only the Twins. Even with Paxton (1.4 HR/9) and Strasburg (1.0 HR/9) on the mound, both pitchers arent immune to surrendering the long ball, so theres plenty of reason to suspect at least one player will take one out on a hot and muggy night in Washington to cash this BetMGM promo.

And dont forget, despite these two teams playing in a National League park, theres the added benefit of the designated hitter to provide some bonus opportunities for a home run.

Getting set up to score this awesome 100-1 home run promo is about as easy as it gets for players in Indiana, New Jersey, and Colorado. Heres how to do it:

In the unlikely event these lineups somehow fail to go deep, youre out $1. If they do muscle one out, youre up $100. Seems worth the risk.

Best of all, now is the time to get in on the sports betting action ahead of whats expected to be an unprecedented late summer run of action. Starting next week, the NBA will begin its sprint to close out the regular season before a highly anticipated postseason. Meanwhile, the NHL postseason is coming, and, of course, baseball is back. That means theres plenty of opportunity to bet and win big at BetMGM in the coming weeks.

Oh yeah, and football is coming, too. Gear up.

After closing (and cashing) as a sizable favorite on Thursday night, the Yankees are once again a fairly strong -136 favorite over the Nationals tonight. Meanwhile, the total is set at 9 runs. Seems like a hard number to achieve without at least one homer.

Click here to get BetMGM and bet $1 to win $100 on the Yankees or Nationals to hit a home run tonight.

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BetMGM Has Crazy 100-1 Odds On The Yankees or Nats To Go Deep Tonight - Crossing Broad

Chest-Deep’ Wildflowers Are Blooming in Reds Meadow – NBC Southern California

Wildflowers and springtime? They're the peanut butter and jelly, or cookies and milk, if you prefer, of our wonderful wilder world come March and April.

That said, many of California's most majestic wildflower displays don't arrive in the calendar's third and fourth month. There are the awesome desert wildflowers of late January and February, while in the mountainous peaks of the Sierra? Blossoms can open well into July.

Some recent visitors to Reds Meadow Valley found pretty proof of this on July 22, with "chest-deep" flowers adding color and cheer to their nature stroll.

If you plan to visit the area, please do check travel advisories and pandemic protocols before setting off.

Also? The summertime shuttle is not running in 2020, the one that departs from the Mammoth Mountain Main Lodge. Making other arrangements as to how you'll reach Reds Meadow and Devils Postpile National Monument is essential.

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Chest-Deep' Wildflowers Are Blooming in Reds Meadow - NBC Southern California

The Man-Eater part 3 – Lake County Record-Bee

Reel Foots history is a litany of crime. Charley Sapp was the nextmanto face Reel Foot. He was in the woods hunting when they met. When the confrontation ended, Charley had lost half his right leg, a third of his right hand, and most of his scalp to Reel foot. When asked, Charley declared, Of all the grizzly bears that the Devil put on this earth there never was a bear like Reel Foot.

Things had been quiet for years and there had been no more recent killings of humans or hogs when Reel Foot reappeared. It may have been the forest fires that plagued parts of Lake County that year. It burned up the lairs of panthers, deer and other wild animals and those same fires may have smoked out old Reel Foot.

John Copsey, the youngman, that had vowed to avenge the death at the paws and claws of the Grizzly for his friend, H.A. Churchs awful death, had grown to manhood. Copsey was now not only the tallestmanin Lake County, he was also a veteran bear hunter. When he spied Reel-Foots tracks on his ranch he grabbed his rifle with one thought in mind.

Soon after he found his bear. Reel Foot was still in his sullen bad humor and ready to eat any human or two that crossed his trail. This time John Copsey did not depend on a single shot muzzle loader. He had a good repeating rifle. When he found the bear he fired. Reel Foot didnt seem to mind the bullet in the least. Copsey might have been throwing peas at a sponge. John levered the rifle for a second shot. The lever stuck and Reel Foot charged.

I thought my end had come, said John later. In a moment or two I was sure I would join my friend Church.

Copsey managed to draw his knife, a long-bladed tool, and planted the blade deep in Reel-Foots ribs. It was well place and ended the Grizzlys crime spree for once and all time. When he was weighed the Giant Grizzly topped the scale at 1350 pounds. Forty-five bullets were found in his body and his thick coat was a crazy quilt of scars. The townspeople came to see the remains of the famousman-eating bear; the behemoth of a Grizzly that held the title for the greatest and the last of the Grizzles to terrorize Lake County.

Additional Note by Kevin Engle.

The traditional Pomo people worship the bear as a great spirit. The Pomo Tribe must be considered one of the great Bear Clans of the Indian Nations. The Elem band even talks of a Bear Totem they had outside their dance hall and a special dance they performed in tribute to this sacred animal. After performing this dance, they would fade into the brush. It is said the bear would come down from the hills and dance around the Elem Totem on its hind legs. The so-called Shamanic practice of shape changing is also done in bear form, which allows the practitioner the ability to cover great distances in short order.

The late Lake County Historian, Henry Mauldin, claimed that a large part of the land at the southern end of Clear lake was off limits to the Pomo people. It was considered too dangerous to pass through except by Tule boat.

An area above the North Shore, around Bartlett Springs, had a few caves that were often occupied by bears. Local pioneers cemented the entrances to these caves shut so the bears could no longer congregate there.

The great John Bidwell also spoke in his memoirs of the times before the Gold Rush when he would visit with the various tribes of northern California. He was known to carry a severed bears paw with him on one excursion, which impressed the natives no end.

To enjoy more of Genes writing and read his books, visitGenes website;http://genepaleno.com/

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The Man-Eater part 3 - Lake County Record-Bee

SPIRIT MATTERS: Breathing through the day – LaSalle News Tribune

There are days when I like to think I have it all together.

And then there are days, like today, that remind me of my tendency to be an absolute train wreck.

So let me just apologize now if this column does not turn out to be what you are used to reading. I will make it up to you in the future, I hope. And, if I come off sounding like a whining child, I apologize in advance for that too.

Without boring you with too much detail, the dog has an infected ear and was trying to tell me such all night last night, before I finally realized it and gave him some ear drops this morning, providing him now with some much needed restful sleep.

The kind of restful sleep I did not have the luxury of last night, as he kept trying to tell me something was wrong, and I was too tired and groggy to figure out what it was. (With him, it could be a multitude of things, ranging from: hes just hungry for a biscuit, or he needs to go outside, or the pain in his ear is killing him and he doesnt have the words to tell me.)

The kind of restful sleep I wish I could crawl back into bed now and get, so I can think more clearly than I am thinking right now.

But I cant, because I am running late on getting ready for work. (A side note: the dog usually goes to daycare today, but I called him off because of his ear infection. He gets to stay home and sleep all day alas, I dont.)

Now, normally, on days like these I would just suck it up and carry on, but as I mentioned in last weeks column, often my entire day is colored by how it begins.

I have an important meeting this afternoon (of course!), one which I need to be alert for, with all cylinders up and running.

Knowing that, my anxiety level is a little higher today than usual (as I said, a good nights sleep can do wonders for easing anxiety, and all kinds of other ailments.)

I did step away from the laptop about 20 minutes ago, to eat some cereal and take my medications and vitamins, hoping that would give me an immediate mental boost.

It really didnt.

So, now, as I race to finish this, get a shower and appropriately dressed for my meeting this afternoon, I am resorting to THE primal remedy for situations of these sort apart from restful sleep.

I sit here now, nearly finished with this rambling, and at the same time, breathing in deeply from my abdomen. They are intentionally longer and deeper breaths than the normal shallow breaths I take at times like these.

And, as I sit here and take several of them, not rushing, just letting my body breathe deeply, as it desires to breathe, I can feel my body and my brain waking up, finally; becoming a bit more alert and ready for what lies ahead for me today.

I could go into detail about how this simple exercise has helped me in the past during emergency situations, but I dont have time.

So, let me just leave you with this.

If you wake up on the wrong side of the bed like I did today, or if your day piles up with a mountain of stressors and grievances, let me encourage you to step back, remove yourself from the situation, and take a handful of deep, abdominal, cleansing, clarifying breaths.

This will restore life to your body, mind and spirit.

Maybe not like a good nights sleep would.

But it's the next best thing.

And if you need help taking those abdominal breaths naturally, just imagine yourself lying down and the Breath of Life, which animates the universe, breathing deep breaths into your body, your mind, your spirit.

And raising you to new Life.

Today.

And every day.

SPIRIT MATTERSis a weekly column that examines spirituality. Contact Jerrilyn Zavada at jzblue33@yahoo.com to share how you engage your spirit in your life and in your community.

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SPIRIT MATTERS: Breathing through the day - LaSalle News Tribune

Coping with COVID: These stunning Instagram artworks dive deep into the mind – Cond Nast Traveller India

To say that the COVID pandemic hasnt been easy is to state the obvious. Forget travelling, even catching up with friends over a drink or dinner has been impossible. Locked indoors, we are all coping with stress, anxiety and loneliness in our own way, some not as well as others. The upshot, if any, is that we are now discussing mental health more liberally. And helping the cause are artists on Instagram who are explaining mental health through their work. What does the mind look like in the midst of an anxiety attack? What does overthinking feel like? What can depression do to you? Graphic artists are using their skills to express, explain and empathise.

Illustrator Ananya Broker Parekh is spot on with her work on worrying and overthinking. Using a ball of yarn, she shows what it can feel like, how it festers and can take over your entire being.

Illustrator Tori Press takes the stigma out of seeking therapy and sketches how wonderfully counselling can help one grow. A self-proclaimed therapy enthusiast, she has several other relatable illustrations.

How many of us have been craving some form of physical touch or the other during this lockdown? Illustrator Pearl DSouzas cuddle club makes us think about who we miss the most. Physical touch is a special thing, she writes. Parents, siblings, pets, friends, partners. This lockdown has been hard on all of us, so please dont forget to give virtual and physical cuddles to anyone special to you.

Artist Aparna Ashok tells a thought-provoking tale of a sour orange. It lives its life feeling sour, unable to enjoy anything it does. Ashok leaves the story open-ended, giving her audience a chance to decide its fate. She writes: We often get caught up in a world wind of emotions and fail to recognise the little things in life that matter. Before we realise it, time has passed us by leaving us with regret and remorse. But what if we took control over our emotions? How would our stories end then? Theres a lesson here.

Heal With Art, an Instagram page curated by graphic designer Tanya Mahajan, encourages art therapy. In this illustration, she shows the various paths the mind can see but cant pick, while giving hope to her audience that they will find their way. She writes: Every day, we all are pushing ourselves a little further to cope up with the pandemic. With this unpredictable situation, we all are filled with unwanted emotions, which later leads to anxiety and depression. Please use this time to involve yourself into activities that help your emotions to flow. Thats the only way you can go through it.

Im fine!. How often are we told this, only to realise later that they were anything but. With this comparison to a deflating balloon, artist Brie encourages her audience to check up on people you more often.

This is comic book artist Meredith Laxtons take on what its fine can really mean.

An artist who goes by Feelings Boi on Instagram had this take on depression: Depression can feel like a vampire. It can suck the colour from your life leaving the world around you feeling desaturated.

Abstract artist Ashley reminds us that the mind can play tricks on you. Sharing her work, she writes: It serves as a reminder that my brain can lie to me and tell me things that are untrue. Sometimes you have to check yourself and thats totally okay!

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Coping with COVID: These stunning Instagram artworks dive deep into the mind - Cond Nast Traveller India

COVID-19 Update: Global Mindfulness Meditation Apps Market is Expected to Grow at a Healthy CAGR with top players Deep Relax, Smiling Mind, Inner…

Due to the pandemic, we have included a special section on the Impact of COVID 19 on the Mindfulness Meditation AppsMarket which would mention How the Covid-19 is Affecting the Industry, Market Trends and Potential Opportunities in the COVID-19 Landscape, Key Regions and Proposal for Mindfulness Meditation Apps Market Players to battle Covid-19 Impact.

The Mindfulness Meditation AppsMarket report is one of the most comprehensive and important data about business strategies, qualitative and quantitative analysis of Global Market. The research report gives the potential headway openings that prevails in the global market. It offers detailed research and analysis of key aspects of the Mindfulness Meditation Apps market. The market analysts authoring this report have provided in-depth information on leading growth drivers, restraints, challenges, trends, and opportunities to offer a complete analysis of the Mindfulness Meditation Apps market. Moreover, the report gives nitty gritty data on different manufacturers, region, and products which are important to totally understanding the market.

Key Companies/Manufacturers operating in the global Mindfulness Meditation Apps market include:Deep Relax, Smiling Mind, Inner Explorer, Inc., Committee for Children, Stop, Breathe, & Think PBC, The Mindfulness App, Mindfulness Everywhere Ltd., Ten Percent Happier, Breethe, Insights Network, Inc., Simple Habit, Inc., Calm.com, Inc., Meditation Moments B.V., Headspace, Inc. and More

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Type Segmentation: (IOS, Android ) Industry Segmentation: (0 5 Years, 6 12 Years, 13 18 Years, 19 Years and Above, )

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Regions Covered in the Global Mindfulness Meditation Apps Market: The Middle East and Africa (GCC Countries and Egypt) North America (the United States, Mexico, and Canada) South America (Brazil etc.) Europe (Turkey, Germany, Russia UK, Italy, France, etc.) Asia-Pacific (Vietnam, China, Malaysia, Japan, Philippines, Korea, Thailand, India, Indonesia, and Australia)

Years Considered to Estimate the Mindfulness Meditation Apps Market Size:History Year: 2015-2019Base Year: 2019Estimated Year: 2020Forecast Year: 2020-2025

Key questions answered in the report:

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COVID-19 Update: Global Mindfulness Meditation Apps Market is Expected to Grow at a Healthy CAGR with top players Deep Relax, Smiling Mind, Inner...

Pralaya Yoga’s Adult Nap Time Could Be the Lullaby You’re Needing in 2020 – Houstonia Magazine

I cant be the only one whos struggling to just turn my mind off when my head hits the pillow at night. With everything going on in the world right now, I feel like my brain is stuck running a marathon; a feeling most of us have become well-acquainted with over the past few months.

To find a cure for my restless nights, I went to Pralaya Yoga in Montrose, whereJohn Tran and Saumil Manekteach theRest + Restore + Soundbath Class(also referred to as Adult Nap Time) to see if I could get some relief from my racing thoughts.

Adult Nap Time is offeredvirtually and in-person at Pralayas Dunlavy Street studio four times a weekMondays at 9 p.m., Wednesdays at 8:30 p.m., Fridays at 6 p.m., and Sundays at 5 p.m. After virtually taking their hour-long class, I knew I definitely went to the right place to calm my mind. I didnt need any previous yoga experience, I could do it from my living room, and I hopped onto the Zoom right as I usually start winding down for the night at 8:30 p.m.

When the class started, I wondered why Manek was playing large drum-like instruments instead of streaming a playlist like most studios. Turns out, he wasnt just setting a relaxing mood, but guiding us through sound therapy with quartz crystal singing bowls.

The singing bowls are played at 432 hertzwhat Manek and many others refer to as the heartbeat of the universeand the frequency is believed to help the flow of oxygen through the body, provide a deeper sense of relaxation, and increase mental clarity. By playing these bowls throughout the class, he was lowering our blood pressure, helping with anxiety and PTSD, flooding the brain with dopamine, releasing oxytocin, and relieving stress.

Because of this sound's powerful impact on the body, Manek believes its a principal reason people remain calm and connected through the class. It helps you stay present, Manek says. You cant think about anything else because the sounds are so penetrating to your mind, your vibrations, your heart, everything.

On top of that, each singing bowl resonates with a specific chakra, the seven different energy centers located at set points throughout the body. As Tran guided us through a variety of yoga positions and thought processes meant to help us connect with different chakras, Manek played whichever bowl resonates with it to help the connection be made easier and deeper.

Tranfocused heavily on three different chakras throughout the classthe root chakra, which represents our security and power; the sacral chakra, which represents our emotions, creativity, and intimacy; and the heart chakra, which represents giving and receiving loveto emphasize why we should be confident and grateful, and why we should strive for inner peace.

Between journeying through the chakras and focusing on deep breathing, something many of us forget to do far too often, I left the class feeling like I had just drunk the best cup of coffee without the caffeine jitters. I was both rejuvenated and ready for the deepest sleep of my life.

For a full class schedule, access deals on virtual class passes, or register for a class, check out Pralaya Yogas website.

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Pralaya Yoga's Adult Nap Time Could Be the Lullaby You're Needing in 2020 - Houstonia Magazine

Mindfulness Meditation Apps Market (impact of COVID-19) To See Massive Growth By 2026| Committee for Children, Insights Network, Inc., Smiling Mind,…

It is our aim to provide our readers with report for Mindfulness Meditation Apps Market, which examines the industry during the period 2020 2026. One goal is to present deeper insight into this line of business in this document. The first part of the report focuses on providing the industry definition for the product or service under focus in the Mindfulness Meditation Apps Market report. Next, the document will study the factors responsible for hindering and enhancing growth in the industry. After covering various areas of interest in the industry, the report aims to provide how the Mindfulness Meditation Apps Market will grow during the forecast period.

The major vendors covered:

Committee for Children, Insights Network, Inc., Smiling Mind, Deep Relax, Stop, Breathe, & Think PBC, Inner Explorer, Inc., Ten Percent Happier, The Mindfulness App, Breethe, Mindfulness Everywhere Ltd., Simple Habit, Inc., Headspace, Inc., Meditation Moments B.V., Calm.com, Inc. and more

The final report will add the analysis of the Impact of Covid-19 on Mindfulness Meditation Apps Market.

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The Mindfulness Meditation Apps Market report between the years 2020 2026 will highlight the current value of the industry. At the same time, there is also an estimate of how much this line of business will be worth at the end of the forecast period. As it is our goal to maintain high levels of accuracy at all times, we will take a look at the CAGR of the Mindfulness Meditation Apps Market. We make sure that all the information available in this report has excellent levels of readability. One way we achieve this target is by Mindfulness Meditation Apps Market segmentation. Going through the report for 2020 2026 will bring our readers up-to-date regarding this industry.

While examining the information from this document, one thing becomes clear, the elements which contribute to increase in demand for the product or service. At the same time, there will be a focus on what drives the popularity of these types of products or services. This report is for those who want to learn about Mindfulness Meditation Apps Market, along with its forecast for 2020 2026. Information regarding market revenue, competitive partners, and key players will also be available.

Segmentation

As discussed earlier, there is segmentation in the Mindfulness Meditation Apps Market report, to improve the accuracy and make it easier to collect data. The categories which are the dividing factors in the industry are distribution channels, application, and product or service type. With this level of segmentation, it becomes easier to analyze and understand the Mindfulness Meditation Apps Market. At the same time, there is emphasis on which type of consumers become the customers in this industry. When it comes to distribution channels, the Mindfulness Meditation Apps Market report looks at the different techniques of circulation of the product or service.

Regional Overview

In this part of the Mindfulness Meditation Apps Market report, we will be taking a look at the geographical areas and the role they play in contributing to the growth of this line of business. The areas of interest in this document are as follows Middle East and Africa, South and North America, Europe, and Asia Pacific. From the Mindfulness Meditation Apps Market report, it becomes clear which region is the largest contributor.

Latest Industry News

From this Mindfulness Meditation Apps Market report, the reader will also get to learn about the latest developments in the industry. The reason is that these products or services have the potential to disrupt this line of business. If there is information about company acquisitions or mergers, this information will also be available in this portion of the Mindfulness Meditation Apps Market report.

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Mindfulness Meditation Apps Market (impact of COVID-19) To See Massive Growth By 2026| Committee for Children, Insights Network, Inc., Smiling Mind,...

‘McMindfulness,’ and why deep breathing isn’t always the answer – Dailyuw

Editors note: Off the Books is a biweekly column diving straight into that stack of unread nonfiction on your nightstand. Rather than reviews, articles cover topics from each book that are particularly relevant to college students and Seattle life, with input from professors and UW community members to round out the picture.

The Daily writes a lot about mindfulness (including yoga, meditation, self-care, mental health, and every other iteration you can imagine). Its something we pride ourselves on. Whether it be for coping with the stress of classes, UWs lovely competitive majors, or simply the state of the world, we never thought that encouraging students to take a couple deep breaths could do any harm.

But, as I am sure you have already realized during the adventure that has been 2020, nothing is without layers, and mindfulness practice is yet another thing that we can no longer simply take at face value.

The 2019 book McMindfulness: How Mindfulness Became the New Capitalist Spirituality, by Ronald Purser, explores how the contemporary mindfulness industry is yet another hand that simply feeds the proverbial neoliberal beast. Misappropriated mindfulness practice simultaneously privatizes, pathologizes, and depoliticizes stress, moving focus away from the systemic sources of anxiety in society and placing them solely on the individual.

It says the causes of suffering are disproportionately inside us, not in the political and economic frameworks that shape how we live, Purser says. In other words, contemporary mindfulness says that there is nothing wrong with capitalism, that we as individuals are simply maladapted to the demands of modern society, and that we need to get our shit together.

Ill be honest: a disparaging attack of neoliberalism by a snarky 64-year-old white man was not what I signed up for. Purser doesnt necessarily feel like the right person to be broaching this issue. But to his credit, he brings up a wealth of important considerations, and Im never going to complain about a little late-stage capitalism hate.

One of the main topics Purser tackles is mindfulnesss focus on calming and being present in the moment, both things Purser views as coping mechanisms that stall revolutionary political change.

However, Danny Arguetty, mindfulness manager at UW Recreation, has a more optimistic take. He believes it is a common misconception that mindfulness and yoga focus solely on calming and slowing down the mind.

Its a welcoming of the full spectrum of human emotion, Arguetty said. So if (or lets be honest, when) youre angry, successful mindfulness practice should help you fully experience that anger before thoughtfully and skillfully taking up action.

Purser is also concerned about the use of mindfulness Buddhist roots as some kind of sales tactic. Depending on the audience, he points out that mindfulness teachers may wear Buddhist robes and chant, or they might rely on a PowerPoint with neuroimaging, callouts to productivity, and stock images of people looking tranquil on beaches. Turning Buddhism on and off in this way can feel manipulative.

However, Joseph Marino, an assistant professor of Buddhist studies, points out that since there is no one form of Buddhism, the modern movement is not betraying any traditional practice.

A search for any original sense of the Buddhist notion of mindfulness will reveal a regular process of change and reinterpretation of the concept across time and space, Marino said in an email. This includes modern changes like [Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction].

Jane Compson, assistant professor in interdisciplinary arts and sciences at UW Tacoma, agrees that modern mindfulness practice isnt betraying or misappropriating Buddhist tradition.

The whole concept of Buddhism is a Western construct, Compson said. The Buddha never described anything like we would call an -ism. He just said this is a path, a discipline, and training, to help alleviate suffering.

Compson and Arguetty agree that they dont want to lose prospective students who are turned off by the idea of a religious practice, and neither feels the secular-religious distinction to be particularly accurate or useful.

Something they are more concerned about is students with traumatic backgrounds.

If youre teaching somebody mindfulness and theyve had a traumatic background, and you dont know how to teach it with that in mind, then some people can end up being retraumatized by traumatic memories that come up while theyre meditating, and that can cause harm, Compson said.

The teaching of mindfulness without a clear code of ethics that prevents this kind of harm is a concern, particularly because ethics comprises a significant part of Buddhist teachings.

For Buddhists, meditation is only part of a path of practice that also includes recommendations for moral behavior, Marino said.

Compson agrees that mindfulness would benefit from being taught in conjunction with ethics, compassion cultivation, or other aspects of the Buddhist Eightfold Path, but she is adamant that no harm can come of focusing on one of them and, in fact, believes that studying one aspect will help to inadvertently cultivate the others.

So is any of this to say you shouldnt be practicing mindfulness? Not at all. But its also necessary to think critically about your practice and to hold the community accountable while finding the bandwidth and resilience you need to continue fighting for change.

Marino says mindfulness of the four satipahnas the body, the feelings, the mind, and dharmas can provide us with refuge and protection from being overwhelmed by the world. And I dont know about you, but thats certainly something I could use right now.

Reach Co-Copy Chief Sam Steele at arts@dailyuw.com. Twitter: @samsteele246

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'McMindfulness,' and why deep breathing isn't always the answer - Dailyuw

Deep cultural shifts required: open letter from 500 legal women calls for reform of way judges are appointed and disciplined – Women’s Agenda

In an open letter to Attorney-General Christian Porter, about 500 women working in the law from across Australia have sought changes to the way judges are disciplined and appointed, writes Gabrielle Appleby, from UNSW in this piece republished from The Conversation.

The letter comes after former High Court judge Dyson Heydon was found by an independent investigation to have sexually harassed young female associates of the court, as reported by The Sydney Morning Herald.

The letter was also sent to Susan Kiefel, Chief Justice of the High Court of Australia, along with another letter to thank her

for her strong, decisive and compassionate responses to the complaints in the Heydon matter, and ask her to work with the government to see these reforms implemented in a way sensitive to the protection of judicial integrity and independence.

The full text of the two letters are below, along with the names of signatories.

Dear Attorney-General

We are writing following the publication of the High Courts response to the complaints about the conduct of Mr Dyson Heydon AC QC during his time as a judge on the Court. As women working across the legal profession, we have welcomed the Chief Justices strong response to the independent inquirys recommendations about providing better protections to associates during their time employed at the Court, recognising their particularly vulnerable professional position.

We believe the abuse the allegations raise provides an important opportunity to implement wider reforms to address the high incidence of sexual harassment, assault and misconduct in the legal profession. Deep cultural shifts in how men treat women in the law are required, as well as reforms to prevent the manifestations of what many fear may be institutionalised sexism that has allowed this culture to continue. We must reach a position where all people, regardless of their sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, intersex status, age, race, ethnicity, or disability are treated with equal professional dignity. Of course, no single reform can achieve these shifts, and we understand many different forms of change must be pursued.

We are writing to urge you to implement two types of judicial institution reform the establishment of an independent complaints body and the introduction of a transparent appointments process. We believe these will prove to be important systemic contributions towards deeper cultural shifts.

To ensure these reforms are introduced and designed with appropriate levels of respect for the independence of the judiciary, we ask you to develop them with the cooperation and input of the judges. We encourage you to work with the Chief Justice of the High Court, to whom we have provided a copy of this letter, and the Council of Chief Justices of Australia and New Zealand to see them implemented. The Council of Chief Justices also offers an opportunity for these reforms to be considered at a national level to operate not just for the federal judiciary, but potentially across the federation.

First, we encourage the creation of an independent complaints body, with a standing jurisdiction to receive complaints against federal judges, investigate any complaints and provide appropriate responses to them. This institutional reform would ensure there is an established body to which future complainants may turn, whether they be court employees, members of the profession, the judiciary or members of the public. It would provide an independent avenue for individuals to seek redress with some guarantees of privacy and protection against recrimination, such as defamation actions.

An oversight institution such as this must be carefully designed so as to meet expectations of accountability for judicial misconduct, while protecting judges from unfounded allegations and not placing the judiciary in a subordinate position to any other branch of government. We underscore the necessity of any institution to respect judicial independence, and the requirements of Chapter III of the Constitution. If well designed with these considerations in mind, we believe such an institution could enhance public confidence in the integrity and independence of the judiciary.

In respect of its design, any institution should be informed by best practice and the standards that apply to complaint handling, such as ISO 10002:2004: Quality Management Customer Satisfaction Guidelines for Complaint Handling in Organizations. It should also be informed, although not limited, by the design of institutions that are already operating in many jurisdictions, including the Judicial Commission of New South Wales, the Judicial Conduct Commissioner of South Australia, the Judicial Commission Victoria, the ACT Judicial Council and most recently, the Judicial Commission of the Northern Territory.

Informed by such standards and the experience of these jurisdictions, we propose the following principles for the design of a national judicial complaints institution:

In respect of its design, we proposed the following principles:

We hope government will seize the opportunity these shocking revelations have provided to implement these, and other, reforms that will contribute to making the law a safer profession for women into the future.

Yours faithfully,

Nina Abbey, Senior Associate, Maurice Blackburn Dr Rebecca Ananian-Welsh, TC Beirne School of Law, The University of Queensland Kate Andean, Partner, Banki Haddock Fiora Larissa Andelman, NSW Bar and President of the Women Lawyers Association of NSW Ingrid Antolinez, Paralegal, Maurice Blackburn Professor Gabrielle Appleby, UNSW Law and Director, the Judiciary Project, Gilbert + Tobin Centre of Public Law Associate Professor Elisa Arcioni, Sydney Law School Amelia Arndt, Lawyer, Gilbert + Tobin, Perth Office Claire Arthur, Lawyer, Gilbert + Tobin, Sydney Office Amanda Atkins, Lawyer, Gilbert + Tobin, Melbourne Office The Hon Roslyn Atkinson AO Sarah Avery, Paralegal, Maurice Blackburn Elizabeth Avery, Partner, Gilbert + Tobin, Sydney Office Sara Ayoub, Lawyer, Gilbert + Tobin, Sydney Office Irene Baghoomians, Sydney Law School Caitlin Baker, Associate, Slater and Gordon Vanessa Balnaves, Senior Solicitor, Johnston Withers Lawyers Robin Banks, PhD Candidate, Faculty of Law, University of Tasmania Diane Banks, Partner, Gilbert + Tobin, Sydney Office Professor Elise Bant, FAAL, UWA Law School and Melbourne Law School Michelle Barnes, South Australian Bar Professor Katy Barnett, Melbourne Law School, University of Melbourne Jillian Barrett, Principal Lawyer, Maurice Blackburn Jennifer Barron, Partner, Gilbert + Tobin, Sydney Office Professor Lorana Bartels, FAAL, Criminology Program Leader, ANU and Adjunct Professor of Law, University of Canberra and University of Tasmania Associate Professor Francesca Bartlett, TC Beirne School of Law, The University of Queensland Michaela Bartonkova, Senior Associate, Maurice Blackburn Rachel Bassil, Partner, Gilbert + Tobin, Sydney Office Professor Vivienne Bath, Sydney Law School Jennifer Batrouney AM QC, Victorian Bar and Convenor of the Women Barristers Association Fiona Batten, Victorian Bar Katherine Bedford, Associate, Maurice Blackburn Narelle Bedford, Faculty of Law, Bond University Distinguished Professor Larissa Behrendt, University of Technology Sydney Selma Bekric, Lawyer, Gilbert + Tobin, Sydney Office Anna Belgiorna-Nettis, Lawyer, Gilbert + Tobin, Sydney Office Cassie Bell, Lawyer, Gilbert + Tobin, Sydney Office Andrea Bennett, Lawyer, Gilbert + Tobin, Sydney Office Professor Lyria Bennett Moses, UNSW Law Dr Laurie Berg, Senior Lecturer, Faculty of Law, University of Technology Sydney Rachel Bhatt, Lawyer, Maurice Blackburn Professor Katherine Biber, Faculty of Law, University of Technology Sydney Associate Professor Alysia Blackham, Melbourne Law School, University of Melbourne Madison Blacklock, Paralegal, Maurice Blackburn Olivia Blakiston, Lawyer, Gilbert + Tobin, Sydney Office Laura Blandthorn, Lawyer, Slater and Gordon Manisha Blencowe, Practice Group Leader, Slater and Gordon Alex Blennerhassett, Lawyer, Slater and Gordon Natalie Blok, Victorian Bar Cynthia Bluett, Partner, PE Family Law Samantha Boardman, Lawyer, Maurice Blackburn Sophie Bogard, Lawyer, Gilbert + Tobin, Sydney Office Associate Professor Tracey Booth, Faculty of Law, University of Technology Sydney Associate Professor Catherine Bond, UNSW Law Hilary Bonney, Victorian Bar and writer Grace Borsellino, Lecturer in Law, Western Sydney University Kate Bouffler, Lawyer, Gilbert + Tobin, Sydney Office Kate Bowshell, Victorian Bar Clancy Bradshaw, Lawyer, Gilbert + Tobin, Sydney Office Margaret Brain, Special Counsel, Maurice Blackburn The Hon. Catherine Branson AC QC, former judge of the Federal Court of Australia (1994-2008) and President of the Australian Human Rights Commission (2008-2012)Julia Bravis, Associate, Slater and Gordon Dr Elizabeth Brophy, Victorian Bar Louise Buckingham, Knowledge and Innovation Lawyer, Gilbert + Tobin, Sydney Office Lauren Burke, Victorian Bar Alison Burt, Victorian Bar Julie Buxton, Victorian Bar Patricia Cahill SC, WA Bar Milly Cain, Lawyer, Maurice Blackburn Sophie Callan, NSW Bar Professor Robyn Carroll, University of Western Australia Law School Dr Anne Carter, Deakin University Megan Casey, Victorian Bar Professor Judy Cashmore, The University of Sydney Law School Gina Cass-Gottlieb, Partner, Gilbert + Tobin, Sydney Office Associate Professor Melissa Castan, Faculty of Law, Monash University Gina Cerasiotis, Law Clerk, Maurice Blackburn Professor Louise Chappell, Director, Australian Human Rights Institute, UNSW Law Tess Chappell, Lawyer, Maurice Blackburn Sue Chakravarthy, Law Clerk, Maurice Blackburn Professor Hilary Charlesworth, Laureate Professor, Melbourne Law School; Distinguished Professor and Director of the Centre for International Governance and Justice, Australian National University Rosslyn Chenoweth, Northern Territory Women Lawyers Association; Secretary, Australian Women Lawyers; Director, Crimes Victims Services Unit, Department of the Attorney-General and Justice (NT) Li-Jean Chew, Partner, Addisons Karmilla Chenia, Lawyer, Maurice Blackburn Grace Chia, Lawyer, Gilbert + Tobin, Melbourne Office Dr Madelaine Chiam, La Trobe Law School Karen Chibert, Victorian Bar Justine Clark, Principal, Tisher Liner FC Law Kerry Clark, South Australian Bar Alison Clues, Chief Commissioner / Chairperson, Workers Rehabilitation & Compensation Tribunal, Asbestos Compensation Tribunal, Health Practitioners Tribunal, Motor Accidents Compensation Tribunal, Anti-Discrimination Tribunal (Tas) Dr Helen Cockburn, Lecturer, Faculty of Law, University of Tasmania Professor Anna Cody, Dean, School of Law, Western Sydney University Michelle Cohen, Principal Solicitor, Public Interest Advocacy Centre Paloma Cole, Lawyer, Maurice Blackburn Christine Collin, General Manager, Maurice Blackburn Catherine Collins, Lawyer, Gilbert + Tobin, Sydney Office Rebecca Collins, Western Australian Bar Julie Comninos, Lawyer, Gilbert + Tobin, Sydney Office Dr Caroline Compton, Research Associate, UNSW Law Celia Conlan, Victorian Bar Madeline Connolly, Lawyer, Gilbert + Tobin, Sydney Office Roslyn Cook, Managing Solicitor, Homeless Persons Legal Service, Public Interest Advocacy Centre Dr Monique Cormier, University of New England School of Law Rebecca Coulter, Lawyer, Maurice Blackburn Eloise Cox, Paralegal, Maurice Blackburn Anne Cregan, Partner, Gilbert + Tobin, Sydney Office Dr Karen Crawley, Senior Lecturer, Griffith Law School Associate Professor Penny Crofts, University of Technology Sydney Associate Professor Melissa Crouch, UNSW Law Kristen Cummings, Paralegal, Maurice Blackburn Tristan Cutliffe, Lawyer, Gilbert + Tobin, Sydney Office Eleanor DAmrosio Scott, Graduate, Slater and Gordon Linda Dalton, Solicitor, NSW Sarah Damon, Victorian Bar Azadeh Dastyari, Associate Professor, Faculty of Law, Western Sydney University Ann-Maree David, Director, Australian Women Lawyers and Australian Gender Equality Council Professor Margaret Davies, Flinders University Professor Megan Davis, Pro Vice Chancellor (Indigenous) UNSW, Balnaves Chair in Constitutional Law, UNSW Law Anna Dawson, Senior Solicitor, Public Interest Advocacy Centre Jessica Dawson-Field, Associate, Maurice Blackburn Tess Deegan, Solicitor, Kingsford Legal Centre UNSW Dr Sara Dehm, Lecturer, Faculty of Law, University of Technology Sydney Sherrilea Discombe, Paralegal, Maurice Blackburn Professor Rosalind Dixon, Director of the Gilbert + Tobin Centre of Public Law, UNSW Law Amanda Do, Lawyer, Maurice Blackburn Patricia Dobson, Victorian Bar Moya Dodd, Partner, Gilbert + Tobin, Sydney Office Lauren Lale Doganay, Law Clerk, Maurice Blackburn Grace Dong, Lawyer, Maurice Blackburn Professor Heather Douglas, TC Beirne School of Law, University of Queensland Dimitra Dubrow, Principal Lawyer, Maurice Blackburn Clair Duffy, lawyer, admitted in Queensland and Victoria Professor Andrea Durbach, UNSW Law Josephine Helen Dwan, PhD candidate, UNSW Canberra at ADFA Catherine Eagle, Solicitor, Welfare Rights & Advocacy Service Kate Eastman SC, NSW Bar Dr Lisa Eckstein, Senior Lecturer in Law and Medicine, University of Tasmania Alice Edwards PhD, international lawyer Alina El Jawhari, Lawyer, Maurice Blackburn Kylie Evans, Victorian Bar Julie Falck, University of Western Australia Law School Emily Fanning, Lawyer, Gilbert + Tobin, Sydney Office Associate Professor Bassina Farbenblum, UNSW Law Vanessa Farego-Diener, Lawyer, Gilbert + Tobin, Sydney Office Rebecca Faugno, University of Western Australia Law School Patricia Femia, Assistant State Counsel, State Solicitors Office of Western Australia Kaitlin Ferris, Principal, Slater and Gordon Sarah Findlay, Lawyer, Gilbert + Tobin, Sydney Office Diane Fingleton, Chief Magistrate of Queensland (2000-2003) Megan Fitzgerald, Victorian Bar Tyneil Flaherty, South Australian Bar Mary Flanagan, Senior Legal Officer, Transitional Justice Program, Public Interest Advocacy Centre Natalie Fleming, Senior Associate, Maurice Blackburn Janine Foo, Lawyer, Maurice Blackburn Emily Forbes, Paralegal, Maurice Blackburn Carolyn Ford, Special Counsel, Maurice Blackburn Catherine Fraser, Lawyer, Gilbert + Tobin, Perth Office Giorgia Fraser, Lawyer, Gilbert + Tobin, Perth Office Juliana Frizziero, Lawyer, Maurice Blackburn Sarah Gaffney-Smith, Senior Associate, Gilbert + Tobin, Perth Office Associate Professor Kate Galloway, Griffith Law School Catherine Gamble, Lawyer, Gilbert + Tobin, Sydney Office Tami Ganemy-Kunoo, Paralegal, Maurice Blackburn Antonia Garling, Lawyer, Gilbert + Tobin, Sydney Office Jane Garnett, Lawyer, Maurice Blackburn Lauren Gavranich, South Australian Bar Daniela Gavshon, Program Director, Transitional Justice Program, Public Interest Advocacy Centre Professor Beth Gaze, Centre for Employment and Labour Relations Law, Melbourne University Law School Professor Katharine Gelber, University of Queensland Professor Alison Gerard, Head of Canberra Law School, University of Canberra Assistant Professor Anthea Gerrard, Faculty of Law, Bond University Professor Felicity Gerry QC, Crockett Chambers and Deakin University, Melbourne Associate Professor and ARC Future Fellow, Rebecca Giblin, Melbourne Law School, University of Melbourne. Sue Gilchrist, Partner and Head of Intellectual Property Australia, Herbert Smith Freehills Rebecca Gilsenan, Principal Lawyer, Maurice Blackburn Lawyers Madeline Gleeson, UNSW Law Dr Beth Goldblatt, Professor, Faculty of Law, University of Technology Sydney Emma Golledge, Director Kingsford Legal Centre UNSW Zoe Gow, Paralegal, Maurice Blackburn Laura Gowdie, Lawyer, Maurice Blackburn Emeritus Professor Reg Graycar, Sydney Law School and Barrister, NSW Bar Alex Grayson, Principal Lawyer, Maurice Blackburn Brooke Greenwood, Senior Solicitor, Indigenous Child Protection Project, Public Interest Advocacy Centre Naty Guerroro-Diaz, Practice Group Leader, Slater and Gordon Alexandra Guild, Victorian Bar Associate Professor Nicole Graham, Sydney Law School, The University of Sydney Associate Professor Genevieve Grant, Director, Australian Centre for Justice Innovation, Faculty of Law, Monash University Mihal Greener, Victorian Bar Brooke Greenwood, Senior Solicitor, Public Interest Advocacy Centre Janine Gregory, Principal Lawyer, Maurice Blackburn Associate Professor Laura Grenfell, Adelaide Law School, The University of Adelaide Astrid Haban-Beer, Treasurer, Australian Women Lawyers, Victorian Bar Kate Haddock, Partner, Banki Haddock Fiora Simone Hall, Lawyer, Gilbert + Tobin, Sydney Office Marita Ham, Victorian Bar Michelle Hamlyn, South Australian Bar Professor Elizabeth Handsley, School of Law, Western Sydney University Michelle Hannon, Partner, Gilbert + Tobin, Sydney Office Dr Kristine Hanscombe QC, Victorian Bar Christine Harb, Lawyer, Gilbert + Tobin, Sydney Office Dr Tess Hardy, Melbourne Law School Syvannah Harper, Lawyer, Maurice Blackburn Deborah Harris, Victorian Bar Associate Professor Susan Harris Rimmer, Griffith Law School Georgia Harrison, Lawyer, Gilbert + Tobin, Sydney Office Kate Harrison, Partner, Gilbert + Tobin, Sydney Office Emily Hart, Principal Lawyer, Maurice Blackburn Laura Hartley, Partner, Addisons Simone Hartley-Keane, Head of People & Culture, Maurice Blackburn Karen Hayne, Partner, Addisons Jane Healey, Victorian Bar Kim Heap, Senior Associate, Dobson Mitchell Allport Sally Heidenreich, South Australian Bar Amanda Hempel, Partner, Gilbert + Tobin, Sydney Office Professor Samantha Hepburn, Deakin University Associate Professor Anne Hewitt, The University of Adelaide Kara Hill, Associate, Maurice Blackburn Professor Lesley Hitchens, Faculty of Law, University of Technology Philippa Hofbrucker, Partner, Gilbert + Tobin, Sydney Office Pamela Hogan, Victorian Bar Sahrah Hogan, Victorian Bar Dr Robyn Holder, Lecturer, School of Criminology and Criminal Justice, Griffith University Ms Sarah Holloway, lawyer Sarah Hook, School of Law, Western Sydney University Associate Professor Jacqui Horan, Member of the Victorian Bar (Academic), Faculty of Law, Monash University Kathleen Housego, Associate, Maurice Blackburn Azmeena Hussain, Principal Lawyer, Maurice Blackburn Dr Danielle Ireland-Piper, Associate Professor, Faculty of Law, Bond University Sofia Isabella-Hopper, Lawyer, Gilbert + Tobin, Melbourne Office Briana Jackman, Paralegal, Maurice Blackburn Nicola Jackson, Lawyer, Gilbert + Tobin, Melbourne Office Nicole Jagger, Lawyer, Maurice Blackburn Michelle James, Senior Associate, Maurice Blackburn Erin Jardine, Lawyer, Gilbert + Tobin, Sydney Office Professor Fleur Johns, UNSW Law Brigida Johnston, UTS Law Graduate Amy Johnstone, Associate, Maurice Blackburn Rachel Jones, Special Counsel, Gilbert + Tobin, Sydney Office Professor Sarah Joseph, Griffith Law School Dr Tanya Josev, Senior Lecturer, Melbourne Law School, University of Melbourne Jennifer Kanis, Principal Lawyer, Maurice Blackburn Erin Kanygin, Legal Transformation Lawyer, Gilbert + Tobin, Melbourne Office Hannah Kay, Associate, Maurice Blackburn Miranda Kaye, Faculty of Law, University of Technology Sydney Carita Kazakoff, Principal Lawyer, Slater and Gordon Professor Fiona Kelly, Dean, La Trobe University Law School Heather Kerley, Maurice Blackburn Jessica Kerr, PhD candidate, UWA Law School, formerly Magistrate, Judiciary of Seychelles Nitra Kidson QC, Higgins Chambers, Brisbane Deborah Kilger, Associate, Hicks Oakley Chessell Williams, President of Victorian Women Lawyers Annabel Kirkby, Lawyer, Gilbert + Tobin, Sydney Office Lesley Kirkwood, Solicitor Louise Klamka, Special Counsel, Gilbert + Tobin, Sydney Office Jessie Klaric, Legal Counsel, BNK Annabelle Klimt, Lawyer, Gilbert + Tobin, Sydney Office Fiona Knowles, Victorian Bar Kristyn Knox, Lawyer, Maurice Blackburn Dr Jane Kotzmann, Lecturer, School of Law, Deakin University Dr Rebecca La Forgia, Adelaide Law School Professor Wendy Lacey FAAL, Executive Dean, Faculty of Business, Government & Law, University of Canberra Corinna Lagerberg, Law Graduate, Maurice Blackburn Belle Lane, Victorian Bar Professor Suzanne Le Mire, University of Adelaide Fiona Leddy, Senior Associate, Maurice Blackburn Michelle Lee, Lawyer, Gilbert + Tobin, Sydney Office Sunny Lee, Consultant, Gilbert + Tobin, Sydney Office Jane Leibowitz, Senior Solicitor, Asylum Seeker Health Rights Project, Public Interest Advocacy Centre Gemma Leigh-Dodds, Senior Associate, Slater and Gordon Lisa Lennon, Partner, Gilbert + Tobin, Sydney Office Haidee Leung, Lawyer, Gilbert + Tobin, Sydney Office Eugenia Levine, Victorian Bar Judith Levine, Independent Arbitrator Claudia Lewis, Lawyer, Gilbert + Tobin, Sydney Office Jessica Liang, Lawyer, Gilbert + Tobin, Sydney Office Associate Prof Terri Libesman, UTS Law Shari Liby, Principal, Slater and Gordon Monica Liesch, Associate, Maurice Blackburn Ffyona Livingstone Clark, Victorian Bar Nicole Lojszczyk, Lawyer, Gilbert + Tobin, Sydney Office Maryanne Loughnan QC, Victorian Bar Dr Trish Luker, Senior Lecturer, UTS Faculty of Law Roisin Lyng, Associate, Maurice Blackburn Therese MacDermott, Professor, Macquarie Law School, Macquarie University Edwina MacDonald, ACOSS Helen MacFarlane, Partner, Addisons Professor Jane McAdam, Scientia Professor of Law, UNSW Law Jessica McAvoy, Associate, Maurice Blackburn Katherine McCallum, Associate, Maurice Blackburn Dr Phillipa McCormack, School of Law, University of Tasmania Holly McCoy, Solicitor, InDIGO Program, Womens Legal Service (SA) Christiana McCudden, Partner, Gilbert + Tobin, Melbourne Office Jane McCullough, Senior Associate, Slater and Gordon Associate Professor Jani McCutcheon, University of Western Australia Law School Dr Fiona McDonald, Associate Professor, Faculty of Law, Queensland University of Technology Professor Jan McDonald, School of Law, University of Tasmania Dr Fiona McGaughey, UWA Law School Emily McGee, Paralegal, Maurice Blackburn Dr Carolyn McKay, Senior Lecture, The University of Sydney Law School Amelia McKellar, Lawyer, Gilbert + Tobin, Sydney Office Kathryn McKenzie, Executive Officer, Women Lawyers Association of NSW Sophie McKenzie, Lawyer, Maurice Blackburn Fiona McLeod AO SC, Victorian Bar Dr Kcasey McLoughlin, Newcastle Law School The Hon. Margaret McMurdo AC, former President of the Queensland Court of Appeal; Commissioner, Victorian Royal Commission into Management of Police Informants Dr Rebekah McWhirter, Faculty of Law, University of Tasmania Neeharika Maddula, Lawyer, Gilbert + Tobin, Sydney Office Sashi Maharaj QC, Victorian Bar Dr Felicity Maher, Senior Lecturer, University of Western Australia Law School; Barrister, Quayside Chambers, Perth Rebecca Mahoney, Knowledge Lawyer, Gilbert + Tobin, Sydney Office Shauna Mainprize, Lawyer, Gilbert + Tobin, Sydney Office Claire Mainsbridge, Lawyer, Maurice Blackburn Leah Marrone, Vice-President, Australian Women Lawyers Shanta Martin, Victorian Bar Professor Gail Mason, Sydney Law School, The University of Sydney Vavaa Mawuli, Principal Lawyer, Maurice Blackburn Caitlin Meade, Lawyer, Gilbert + Tobin, Sydney Office Lauren Meath, Graduate, Slater and Gordon Professor Denise Meyerson FAAL, Professor of Law, Macquarie Law School Heather Millar, Western Australian Bar Audrey Mills, Director, Dobson Mitchell Allport Lawyers and former President Australian Women Lawyers Lucy Minter, Associate, Maurice Blackburn Idil Mohamud, Lawyer, Slater and Gordon Jasmine Monastiriotis, Law Clerk, Maurice Blackburn Bethany Moore, Lawyer, Maurice Blackburn Victoria Moore, Paralegal, Maurice Blackburn Professor Jenny Morgan, Melbourne Law School, University of Law School Adrienne Morton, President, Australian Women Lawyers Idil Mohamud, Lawyer, Slater and Gordon Justine Munsie, Partner, Addisons Nikita Moyle, Associate, Maurice Blackburn Jennifer Mulheron, Lawyer, Gilbert + Tobin, Sydney Office Bridie Murphy, Associate, Maurice Blackburn Penny Murray, Partner, Addisons Professor Sarah Murray, University of Western Australia Professor Ngaire Naffine, Adelaide Law School Miranda Nagy, Principal Lawyer, Maurice Blackburn Ayesha Nathan, Law Clerk, Maurice Blackburn Marcia Neave Jane Needham SC, NSW Bar Dr Wendy Ng, Senior Lecturer, Melbourne Law School Dr Yee-Fui Ng, Senior Lecturer, Faculty of Law, Monash University Eileen Nguyen, Principal Lawyer, Slater and Gordon Distinguished Professor Dianne Nicol, Director of the Centre for Law and Genetics, Faculty of Law, University of Tasmania Associate Professor Jane Nielsen, Faculty of Law, University of Tasmania Associate Professor Jennifer Nielsen, School of Law and Justice, Southern Cross UniversityLaura Nigro, Lawyer, Slater and Gordon Annabelle Nilsson, Lawyer, Gilbert + Tobin, Sydney Office Gisela Nip, Deakin University, Judges Associate Kimi Nishimura, Principal Lawyer, Maurice Blackburn Professor Justine Nolan, UNSW Law Sarah Notarianni, Senior Associate, Maurice Blackburn Madeleine OBrien, Paralegal, Maurice Blackburn Anna OCallaghan, Victorian Bar Professor Ann OConnell, Melbourne Law School, University of Melbourne Associate Professor Karen OConnell, Faculty of Law, University of Technology Sydney Claire OConnor SC, South Australian Bar Elizabeth OShea, Senior Associate, Maurice Blackburn Dr Maria OSullivan, Faculty of Law, Monash University Dr Anna Olijnyk, Senior Lecturer, Adelaide Law School, The University of Adelaide Associate Professor Bronwyn Olliffe, Faculty of Law, University of Technology Sydney Hannah Opperman-Williams, Lawyer, Gilbert + Tobin, Sydney Office Emily Ormerod, Lawyer, Maurice Blackburn Professor Margaret Otlowski, Faculty of Law, University of Tasmania and Pro Vice Chancellor (Culture, Wellbeing and Sustainability); Patron, Tasmanian Womens Lawyers. Associate Professor Juliette Overland, Business Law, The University of Sydney Business School Isabel Owen, Lawyer, Gilbert + Tobin, Sydney Office Emerita Professor Rosemary Owens AO, The University of Adelaide Dr Tamsin Paige, Deakin Law School Ivana Pajic, Associate, Maurice Blackburn Kerry Palmer, Senior Associate, Maurice Blackburn Sophia Papadopoulos, Lawyer, Slater and Gordon Professor Christine Parker, Melbourne Law School, The University of Melbourne Professor Jeannie Marie Paterson, Co-Director for the Centre for AI and Digital Ethics, The University of Melbourne Suganya Pathanjalimanoharar, Victorian Bar Emma Pelka-Caven, Practice Group Leader, Slater and Gordon Jana Pennington, Associate, Maurice Blackburn Dr Tania Penovic, Senior Lecturer, Deputy Associate Dean (International), Monash University Elly Phelan, Lawyer, Gilbert + Tobin, Sydney Office Sarah Pickles, Solicitor, Family Violence Legal Service Aboriginal Corporation (SA) Clementine Pickwick, Lawyer, Gilbert + Tobin, Sydney Office Dr Sangeetha Pillai, UNSW Law Claire Pirie, Associate, Slater and Gordon Colleen Platford, Partner, Gilbert + Tobin, Sydney Office Rebecca Preston, Victorian Bar Diana Price, Victorian Bar Phoebe Prossor, Associate, Maurice Blackburn Paula Pulitano, Associate, Slater and Gordon Associate Professor Julia Quilter, School of Law, University of Wollongong Genevieve Rahman, Special Counsel, Gilbert + Tobin, Sydney Office Dr Sally Antionette Raine, Fremantle Law Pty Ltd Zoe Rathus AM, Senior Lecturer, Griffith Law School Jacqueline Reid, Lawyer, Gilbert + Tobin, Sydney Office Rhiannon Reid, Senior Associate, Maurice Blackburn Professor Catherine Renshaw, School of Law, Western Sydney University Professor Sharyn Roach Anleu FAAS, Flinders University Julie Robb, Partner, Banki Haddock Fiora Dr Hannah Robert, Senior Lecturer, La Trobe Law School Associate Professor Heather Roberts, ANU College of Law, ANU Natasha Roberts, Lawyer, Maurice Blackburn Carly Robertson, Victorian Bar Becci Robinson, Lawyer, Gilbert + Tobin, Melbourne Office Jane Robinson, Paralegal, Maurice Blackburn Sharni Robinson, Paralegal, Maurice Blackburn Dr Justine Rogers, UNSW Law Carrie Rome-Sievers, Victorian Bar Fiona Roughley, NSW Bar Professor Kim Rubenstein, FAAL, FASSA, Co-Director, 50/50 by 2030 Foundation, Faculty of Business Governance and Law, University of Canberra Professor Kristen Rundle, Melbourne Law School Dr Olivia Rundle, University of Tasmania Law School Erin Rutherford, Victorian Bar Dr Philippa Ryan, NSW Bar and ANU College of Law Gemma Saccasan, Law Graduate, Maurice Blackburn Professor Maree Sainsbury, University of Canberra Liberty Sanger, Principal Lawyer, Maurice Blackburn Dr Amanda Scardamaglia, Associate Professor and Department Chair, Faculty of Business and Law, Swinburne University of Technology Carolyn Scobie, General Counsel, QBE Insurance Group Associate Professor Kate Seear, Faculty of Law, Monash University, Practising Solicitor Jo Seto, Lawyer, Gilbert + Tobin, Sydney Office Rheya Shah, Lawyer, Gilbert + Tobin, Sydney Office Celeste Shambrook, Senior Associate, Maurice Blackburn Lauren Shave, Senior Associate, Gilbert + Tobin, Perth Office Kim Shaw, Principal Lawyer, Maurice Blackburn Anne Sheehan, Victorian Bar Dr Kym Sheehan, Sydney Law School, The University of Sydney Emily Shen, Lawyer, Gilbert + Tobin, Sydney Office Donna Short, Partner, Addisons Anne Shortall, Special Counsel, Slater and Gordon Dr Ronli Sifris, Senior Lecturer, Faculty of Law, Deputy Director, Castan Centre for Human Rights Law, Monash University Dr Natalie Silver, Faculty of Law, The University of Sydney Associate Professor Amelia Simpson, ANU Law School Zahra Sitou, Paralegal, Maurice Blackburn Professor Natalie Skead, Dean of Law, The University of Western Australia Nina Smart, Lawyer, Maurice Blackburn Verity Smith, Solicitor, Strategic Litigation, Public Interest Advocacy Centre Dr Laura Smith-Khan, Faculty of Law, University of Technology Sydney Anna Smyth, Lawyer, Gilbert + Tobin, Sydney Office Sarah Sorrell, Associate, Maurice Blackburn Professor Tania Sourdin, Dean and Head of School, Newcastle Law School Sarah Snowden, State Practice Group Leader, Slater and Gordon Dr Lisa Spagnolo, Senior Lecturer, Monash Law School Victoria Sparks, Associate, Slater and Gordon Dr Linda Steele, Senior Lecturer, Faculty of Law, University of Technology Sydney Molly Stephens, Lawyer, Maurice Blackburn Professor Natalie Stoianoff, Faculty of Law, University of Technology Sydney Nadia Stojanova, Victorian Bar Toni Stokes, Victorian Bar Dr Cait Storr, Chancellors Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Faculty of Law, University of Technology Sydney Tanya Straguszi, Principal Lawyer, Maurice Blackburn Emma Strugnell, Victorian Bar Professor Anita Stuhmcke, Faculty of Law, University of Technology Sydney Gabrielle Sumich, Lawyer, Gilbert + Tobin, Perth Office Lexi Sun, Lawyer, Gilbert + Tobin, Melbourne Office Dr Carolyn Tan, In-House Legal Counsel at Yamatji Marlpa Aboriginal Corporation Jessie E Taylor, Associate Director, Victoria Legal Aid Chambers. Dr Madeline Taylor, Sydney Law School Amy Teiwes, Paralegal, Maurice Blackburn Karin Temperley, Victoria Legal Aid Amy Tesoriero, UTS Law Graduate Associate Professor Shih-Ning Then, Law Faculty, Queensland University of Technology Rhea Thomas, Solicitor, Welfare Rights & Advocacy Service Amanda Thompson, President, Tasmanian Women Lawyers, Associate, Wallace Wilkinson & Webster Clare Thompson, Western Australian Bar, President of Women Lawyers of WA Emerita Professor Margaret Thornton, ANU College of Law, Australian National University Associate Professor Amelia Thorpe, UNSW Law Ellen Tilbury, Senior Solicitor, Public Interest Advocacy Centre Ltd Eleanor Toohey, Graduate, Slater and Gordon Jenny Tran, Senior Associate, Maurice Blackburn Charmaine Tsang, Director, Australian Women Lawyers; Immediate Past President Women Lawyers of Western Australia Dr Tamara Tulich, UWA Law School Andrea Turner, Associate, Maurice Blackburn Sarah Turner, Partner, Gilbert + Tobin, Perth Office Alison Umbers, Barrister and Mediator, Assistant Convenor of the Women Barristers Association Sarah Vallance, Senior Associate, Maurice Blackburn Kirsten Van Der Wal, Associate, Maurice Blackburn Ella van der Schans, Solicitor, Herbert Smith Freehills, Victorian Director of Australian Women Lawyers Dr Kate van Doore, Griffith Law School Sarah Varney, Victorian Bar Holly Veale, South Australian Bar Sarah Vo, Lawyer, Gilbert + Tobin, Sydney Office Dr Anthea Vogl, Faculty of Law, University of Technology Sydney Alexandra Volk, Lawyer, Maurice Blackburn Mackenzie Wakefield, Law Graduate, Maurice Blackburn Gayann Walker, Assistant Convenor of the Womens Barrister Association of the Victorian Bar Gillian Walker, South Australian Bar Samantha Walker, Associate, Maurice Blackburn Brighdin Walsh, Lawyer, Slater and Gordon Lorraine Walsh, Lawyer, Maurice Blackburn Dr Jane Wangmann, Faculty of Law UTS Stacey Ward, Lawyer, Gilbert + Tobin, Melbourne Office Juliana Warner, Managing Partner, Sydney Office, Herbert Smith Freehills, Dr Helen Watchirs OAM, ACT President and Human Rights Commissioner Nicole Watson, Senior Lecturer, Sydney Law School Tanya Watson, Senior Associate, Julian Johnson Lawyers Dr Kylie Weston-Scheuber, Victorian Bar Professor Sally Wheeler OBE, MRIA, FaCSS, Pro-Vice Chancellor for International Strategy and Dean, Robert Garran Professor of Law, ANU College of Law, Australian National University Jenni Whelan, Clinical Director, School of Law, Western Sydney University Janet Whiting, Partner, Gilbert + Tobin, Melbourne Office Nikki Whiting, Special Counsel, Maurice Blackburn Deborah Wiener, Victorian Bar Marie Wilkening-Le Brun, Victorian Bar Anita Will, Solicitor Kingsford Legal Centre UNSW Kerrie Wood, Lawyer, Maurice Blackburn Donna Woodleigh, Lawyer Aimee Woods, UTS Law Graduate Alice Woolven, Legal Support Officer, City of Casey Isabelle Wong, Lawyer, Gilbert + Tobin, Sydney Office Madeline Wu, Lawyer, Gilbert + Tobin, Sydney Office Angelika Yates, Partner, Addisons April Zahra, Lawyer, Slater and Gordon Jessica Zarkovic, Senior Associate, Slater and Gordon

Dear Chief Justice,

We are writing following the publication of the High Courts response to the complaints about the conduct of Mr Dyson Heydon AC QC during his time as a judge on the Court. We thank you and the Courts Principal Registrar, Ms Philippa Lynch, in particular for the decisive action taken to ensure the complaints were thoroughly investigated by an independent process. We are grateful that you took this matter so seriously and treated the complainants with dignity, compassion and respect. We welcome your response to the inquirys recommendations as to how to provide better protections to associates during their time employed at the Court, recognising their particularly vulnerable professional position.

Today, we have sent a letter to the Commonwealth Attorney-General urging him to seize this moment as an opportunity to implement reforms to address the high incidence of sexual harassment, assault and misconduct in the law. We have asked that he take action to implement two types of institutional reforms an independent complaints body and a transparent judicial appointments process. While no single reform will achieve the necessary cultural shifts in how women are treated in the law, we believe, if properly designed, these will prove to be important systemic contributions towards deeper change.

We are very conscious that these reforms must be developed through close cooperation between the government, through the Attorney-Generals portfolio, and the judiciary. In particular, the creation of an independent complaint-handling body with a standing jurisdiction to receive complaints against federal judges, investigate any complaints and provide appropriate responses to them, must be designed with care. It must meet expectations of accountability for judicial misconduct while protecting judges from unfounded allegations and not compromising judicial independence by placing the judiciary in a subordinate position to any other branch of government.

With these considerations in mind, we have asked the Attorney-General to work with you and the Council of Chief Justices of Australia and New Zealand as an important forum for input from the Australian judiciary into the design of these reforms. We applaud your initial response to this issue. The changes you and Ms Lynch have made will form a significant legacy and will make the law a safer profession for women.

Yours faithfully,

Nina Abbey, Senior Associate, Maurice Blackburn Dr Rebecca Ananian-Welsh, TC Beirne School of Law, The University of Queensland Kate Andean, Partner, Banki Haddock Fiora Larissa Andelman, NSW Bar and President of the Women Lawyers Association of NSW Ingrid Antolinez, Paralegal, Maurice Blackburn Professor Gabrielle Appleby, UNSW Law and Director, the Judiciary Project, Gilbert + Tobin Centre of Public Law Associate Professor Elisa Arcioni, Sydney Law School Amelia Arndt, Lawyer, Gilbert + Tobin, Perth Office Claire Arthur, Lawyer, Gilbert + Tobin, Sydney Office Amanda Atkins, Lawyer, Gilbert + Tobin, Melbourne Office The Hon Roslyn Atkinson AO Sarah Avery, Paralegal, Maurice Blackburn Elizabeth Avery, Partner, Gilbert + Tobin, Sydney Office Sara Ayoub, Lawyer, Gilbert + Tobin, Sydney Office Irene Baghoomians, Sydney Law School Caitlin Baker, Associate, Slater and Gordon Vanessa Balnaves, Senior Solicitor, Johnston Withers Lawyers Robin Banks, PhD Candidate, Faculty of Law, University of Tasmania Diane Banks, Partner, Gilbert + Tobin, Sydney Office Professor Elise Bant, FAAL, UWA Law School and Melbourne Law School Michelle Barnes, South Australian Bar Professor Katy Barnett, Melbourne Law School, University of Melbourne Jillian Barrett, Principal Lawyer, Maurice Blackburn Jennifer Barron, Partner, Gilbert + Tobin, Sydney Office Professor Lorana Bartels, FAAL, Criminology Program Leader, ANU and Adjunct Professor of Law, University of Canberra and University of Tasmania Associate Professor Francesca Bartlett, TC Beirne School of Law, The University of Queensland Michaela Bartonkova, Senior Associate, Maurice Blackburn Rachel Bassil, Partner, Gilbert + Tobin, Sydney Office Professor Vivienne Bath, Sydney Law School Jennifer Batrouney AM QC, Victorian Bar and Convenor of the Women Barristers Association Fiona Batten, Victorian Bar Katherine Bedford, Associate, Maurice Blackburn Narelle Bedford, Faculty of Law, Bond University Distinguished Professor Larissa Behrendt, University of Technology Sydney Selma Bekric, Lawyer, Gilbert + Tobin, Sydney Office Anna Belgiorna-Nettis, Lawyer, Gilbert + Tobin, Sydney Office Cassie Bell, Lawyer, Gilbert + Tobin, Sydney Office Andrea Bennett, Lawyer, Gilbert + Tobin, Sydney Office Professor Lyria Bennett Moses, UNSW Law Dr Laurie Berg, Senior Lecturer, Faculty of Law, University of Technology Sydney Rachel Bhatt, Lawyer, Maurice Blackburn Professor Katherine Biber, Faculty of Law, University of Technology Sydney Associate Professor Alysia Blackham, Melbourne Law School, University of Melbourne Madison Blacklock, Paralegal, Maurice Blackburn Olivia Blakiston, Lawyer, Gilbert + Tobin, Sydney Office Laura Blandthorn, Lawyer, Slater and Gordon Manisha Blencowe, Practice Group Leader, Slater and Gordon Alex Blennerhassett, Lawyer, Slater and Gordon Natalie Blok, Victorian Bar Cynthia Bluett, Partner, PE Family Law Samantha Boardman, Lawyer, Maurice Blackburn Sophie Bogard, Lawyer, Gilbert + Tobin, Sydney Office Associate Professor Tracey Booth, Faculty of Law, University of Technology Sydney Associate Professor Catherine Bond, UNSW Law Hilary Bonney, Victorian Bar and writer Grace Borsellino, Lecturer in Law, Western Sydney University Kate Bouffler, Lawyer, Gilbert + Tobin, Sydney Office Kate Bowshell, Victorian Bar Clancy Bradshaw, Lawyer, Gilbert + Tobin, Sydney Office Margaret Brain, Special Counsel, Maurice Blackburn The Hon. Catherine Branson AC QC, former judge of the Federal Court of Australia (1994-2008) and President of the Australian Human Rights Commission (2008-2012)Julia Bravis, Associate, Slater and Gordon Dr Elizabeth Brophy, Victorian Bar Louise Buckingham, Knowledge and Innovation Lawyer, Gilbert + Tobin, Sydney Office Lauren Burke, Victorian Bar Alison Burt, Victorian Bar Julie Buxton, Victorian Bar Patricia Cahill SC, WA Bar Milly Cain, Lawyer, Maurice Blackburn Sophie Callan, NSW Bar Professor Robyn Carroll, University of Western Australia Law School Dr Anne Carter, Deakin University Megan Casey, Victorian Bar Professor Judy Cashmore, The University of Sydney Law School Gina Cass-Gottlieb, Partner, Gilbert + Tobin, Sydney Office Associate Professor Melissa Castan, Faculty of Law, Monash University Gina Cerasiotis, Law Clerk, Maurice Blackburn Professor Louise Chappell, Director, Australian Human Rights Institute, UNSW Law Tess Chappell, Lawyer, Maurice Blackburn Sue Chakravarthy, Law Clerk, Maurice Blackburn Professor Hilary Charlesworth, Laureate Professor, Melbourne Law School; Distinguished Professor and Director of the Centre for International Governance and Justice, Australian National University Rosslyn Chenoweth, Northern Territory Women Lawyers Association; Secretary, Australian Women Lawyers; Director, Crimes Victims Services Unit, Department of the Attorney-General and Justice (NT) Li-Jean Chew, Partner, Addisons Karmilla Chenia, Lawyer, Maurice Blackburn Grace Chia, Lawyer, Gilbert + Tobin, Melbourne Office Dr Madelaine Chiam, La Trobe Law School Karen Chibert, Victorian Bar Justine Clark, Principal, Tisher Liner FC Law Kerry Clark, South Australian Bar Alison Clues, Chief Commissioner / Chairperson, Workers Rehabilitation & Compensation Tribunal, Asbestos Compensation Tribunal, Health Practitioners Tribunal, Motor Accidents Compensation Tribunal, Anti-Discrimination Tribunal (Tas) Dr Helen Cockburn, Lecturer, Faculty of Law, University of Tasmania Professor Anna Cody, Dean, School of Law, Western Sydney University Michelle Cohen, Principal Solicitor, Public Interest Advocacy Centre Paloma Cole, Lawyer, Maurice Blackburn Christine Collin, General Manager, Maurice Blackburn Catherine Collins, Lawyer, Gilbert + Tobin, Sydney Office Rebecca Collins, Western Australian Bar Julie Comninos, Lawyer, Gilbert + Tobin, Sydney Office Dr Caroline Compton, Research Associate, UNSW Law Celia Conlan, Victorian Bar Madeline Connolly, Lawyer, Gilbert + Tobin, Sydney Office Roslyn Cook, Managing Solicitor, Homeless Persons Legal Service, Public Interest Advocacy Centre Dr Monique Cormier, University of New England School of Law Rebecca Coulter, Lawyer, Maurice Blackburn Eloise Cox, Paralegal, Maurice Blackburn Anne Cregan, Partner, Gilbert + Tobin, Sydney Office Dr Karen Crawley, Senior Lecturer, Griffith Law School Associate Professor Penny Crofts, University of Technology Sydney Associate Professor Melissa Crouch, UNSW Law Kristen Cummings, Paralegal, Maurice Blackburn Tristan Cutliffe, Lawyer, Gilbert + Tobin, Sydney Office Eleanor DAmrosio Scott, Graduate, Slater and Gordon Linda Dalton, Solicitor, NSW Sarah Damon, Victorian Bar Azadeh Dastyari, Associate Professor, Faculty of Law, Western Sydney University Ann-Maree David, Director, Australian Women Lawyers and Australian Gender Equality Council Professor Margaret Davies, Flinders University Professor Megan Davis, Pro Vice Chancellor (Indigenous) UNSW, Balnaves Chair in Constitutional Law, UNSW Law Anna Dawson, Senior Solicitor, Public Interest Advocacy Centre Jessica Dawson-Field, Associate, Maurice Blackburn Tess Deegan, Solicitor, Kingsford Legal Centre UNSW Dr Sara Dehm, Lecturer, Faculty of Law, University of Technology Sydney Sherrilea Discombe, Paralegal, Maurice Blackburn Professor Rosalind Dixon, Director of the Gilbert + Tobin Centre of Public Law, UNSW Law Amanda Do, Lawyer, Maurice Blackburn Patricia Dobson, Victorian Bar Moya Dodd, Partner, Gilbert + Tobin, Sydney Office Lauren Lale Doganay, Law Clerk, Maurice Blackburn Grace Dong, Lawyer, Maurice Blackburn Professor Heather Douglas, TC Beirne School of Law, University of Queensland Dimitra Dubrow, Principal Lawyer, Maurice Blackburn Clair Duffy, lawyer, admitted in Queensland and Victoria Professor Andrea Durbach, UNSW Law Josephine Helen Dwan, PhD candidate, UNSW Canberra at ADFA Catherine Eagle, Solicitor, Welfare Rights & Advocacy Service Kate Eastman SC, NSW Bar Dr Lisa Eckstein, Senior Lecturer in Law and Medicine, University of Tasmania Alice Edwards PhD, international lawyer Alina El Jawhari, Lawyer, Maurice Blackburn Kylie Evans, Victorian Bar Julie Falck, University of Western Australia Law School Emily Fanning, Lawyer, Gilbert + Tobin, Sydney Office Associate Professor Bassina Farbenblum, UNSW Law Vanessa Farego-Diener, Lawyer, Gilbert + Tobin, Sydney Office Rebecca Faugno, University of Western Australia Law School Patricia Femia, Assistant State Counsel, State Solicitors Office of Western Australia Kaitlin Ferris, Principal, Slater and Gordon Sarah Findlay, Lawyer, Gilbert + Tobin, Sydney Office Diane Fingleton, Chief Magistrate of Queensland (2000-2003) Megan Fitzgerald, Victorian Bar Tyneil Flaherty, South Australian Bar Mary Flanagan, Senior Legal Officer, Transitional Justice Program, Public Interest Advocacy Centre Natalie Fleming, Senior Associate, Maurice Blackburn Janine Foo, Lawyer, Maurice Blackburn Emily Forbes, Paralegal, Maurice Blackburn Carolyn Ford, Special Counsel, Maurice Blackburn Catherine Fraser, Lawyer, Gilbert + Tobin, Perth Office Giorgia Fraser, Lawyer, Gilbert + Tobin, Perth Office Juliana Frizziero, Lawyer, Maurice Blackburn Sarah Gaffney-Smith, Senior Associate, Gilbert + Tobin, Perth Office Associate Professor Kate Galloway, Griffith Law School Catherine Gamble, Lawyer, Gilbert + Tobin, Sydney Office Tami Ganemy-Kunoo, Paralegal, Maurice Blackburn Antonia Garling, Lawyer, Gilbert + Tobin, Sydney Office Jane Garnett, Lawyer, Maurice Blackburn Lauren Gavranich, South Australian Bar Daniela Gavshon, Program Director, Transitional Justice Program, Public Interest Advocacy Centre Professor Beth Gaze, Centre for Employment and Labour Relations Law, Melbourne University Law School Professor Katharine Gelber, University of Queensland Professor Alison Gerard, Head of Canberra Law School, University of Canberra Assistant Professor Anthea Gerrard, Faculty of Law, Bond University Professor Felicity Gerry QC, Crockett Chambers and Deakin University, Melbourne Associate Professor and ARC Future Fellow, Rebecca Giblin, Melbourne Law School, University of Melbourne. Sue Gilchrist, Partner and Head of Intellectual Property Australia, Herbert Smith Freehills Rebecca Gilsenan, Principal Lawyer, Maurice Blackburn Lawyers Madeline Gleeson, UNSW Law Dr Beth Goldblatt, Professor, Faculty of Law, University of Technology Sydney Emma Golledge, Director Kingsford Legal Centre UNSW Zoe Gow, Paralegal, Maurice Blackburn Laura Gowdie, Lawyer, Maurice Blackburn Emeritus Professor Reg Graycar, Sydney Law School and Barrister, NSW Bar Alex Grayson, Principal Lawyer, Maurice Blackburn Brooke Greenwood, Senior Solicitor, Indigenous Child Protection Project, Public Interest Advocacy Centre Naty Guerroro-Diaz, Practice Group Leader, Slater and Gordon Alexandra Guild, Victorian Bar Associate Professor Nicole Graham, Sydney Law School, The University of Sydney Associate Professor Genevieve Grant, Director, Australian Centre for Justice Innovation, Faculty of Law, Monash University Mihal Greener, Victorian Bar Brooke Greenwood, Senior Solicitor, Public Interest Advocacy Centre Janine Gregory, Principal Lawyer, Maurice Blackburn Associate Professor Laura Grenfell, Adelaide Law School, The University of Adelaide Astrid Haban-Beer, Treasurer, Australian Women Lawyers, Victorian Bar Kate Haddock, Partner, Banki Haddock Fiora Simone Hall, Lawyer, Gilbert + Tobin, Sydney Office Marita Ham, Victorian Bar Michelle Hamlyn, South Australian Bar Professor Elizabeth Handsley, School of Law, Western Sydney University Michelle Hannon, Partner, Gilbert + Tobin, Sydney Office Dr Kristine Hanscombe QC, Victorian Bar Christine Harb, Lawyer, Gilbert + Tobin, Sydney Office Dr Tess Hardy, Melbourne Law School Syvannah Harper, Lawyer, Maurice Blackburn Deborah Harris, Victorian Bar Associate Professor Susan Harris Rimmer, Griffith Law School Georgia Harrison, Lawyer, Gilbert + Tobin, Sydney Office Kate Harrison, Partner, Gilbert + Tobin, Sydney Office Emily Hart, Principal Lawyer, Maurice Blackburn Laura Hartley, Partner, Addisons Simone Hartley-Keane, Head of People & Culture, Maurice Blackburn Karen Hayne, Partner, Addisons Jane Healey, Victorian Bar Kim Heap, Senior Associate, Dobson Mitchell Allport Sally Heidenreich, South Australian Bar Amanda Hempel, Partner, Gilbert + Tobin, Sydney Office Professor Samantha Hepburn, Deakin University Associate Professor Anne Hewitt, The University of Adelaide Kara Hill, Associate, Maurice Blackburn Professor Lesley Hitchens, Faculty of Law, University of Technology Philippa Hofbrucker, Partner, Gilbert + Tobin, Sydney Office Pamela Hogan, Victorian Bar Sahrah Hogan, Victorian Bar Dr Robyn Holder, Lecturer, School of Criminology and Criminal Justice, Griffith University Ms Sarah Holloway, lawyer Sarah Hook, School of Law, Western Sydney University Associate Professor Jacqui Horan, Member of the Victorian Bar (Academic), Faculty of Law, Monash University Kathleen Housego, Associate, Maurice Blackburn Azmeena Hussain, Principal Lawyer, Maurice Blackburn Dr Danielle Ireland-Piper, Associate Professor, Faculty of Law, Bond University Sofia Isabella-Hopper, Lawyer, Gilbert + Tobin, Melbourne Office Briana Jackman, Paralegal, Maurice Blackburn Nicola Jackson, Lawyer, Gilbert + Tobin, Melbourne Office Nicole Jagger, Lawyer, Maurice Blackburn Michelle James, Senior Associate, Maurice Blackburn Erin Jardine, Lawyer, Gilbert + Tobin, Sydney Office Professor Fleur Johns, UNSW Law Brigida Johnston, UTS Law Graduate Amy Johnstone, Associate, Maurice Blackburn Rachel Jones, Special Counsel, Gilbert + Tobin, Sydney Office Professor Sarah Joseph, Griffith Law School Dr Tanya Josev, Senior Lecturer, Melbourne Law School, University of Melbourne Jennifer Kanis, Principal Lawyer, Maurice Blackburn Erin Kanygin, Legal Transformation Lawyer, Gilbert + Tobin, Melbourne Office Hannah Kay, Associate, Maurice Blackburn Miranda Kaye, Faculty of Law, University of Technology Sydney Carita Kazakoff, Principal Lawyer, Slater and Gordon Professor Fiona Kelly, Dean, La Trobe University Law School Heather Kerley, Maurice Blackburn Jessica Kerr, PhD candidate, UWA Law School, formerly Magistrate, Judiciary of Seychelles Nitra Kidson QC, Higgins Chambers, Brisbane Deborah Kilger, Associate, Hicks Oakley Chessell Williams, President of Victorian Women Lawyers Annabel Kirkby, Lawyer, Gilbert + Tobin, Sydney Office Lesley Kirkwood, Solicitor Louise Klamka, Special Counsel, Gilbert + Tobin, Sydney Office Jessie Klaric, Legal Counsel, BNK Annabelle Klimt, Lawyer, Gilbert + Tobin, Sydney Office Fiona Knowles, Victorian Bar Kristyn Knox, Lawyer, Maurice Blackburn Dr Jane Kotzmann, Lecturer, School of Law, Deakin University Dr Rebecca La Forgia, Adelaide Law School Professor Wendy Lacey FAAL, Executive Dean, Faculty of Business, Government & Law, University of Canberra Corinna Lagerberg, Law Graduate, Maurice Blackburn Belle Lane, Victorian Bar Professor Suzanne Le Mire, University of Adelaide Fiona Leddy, Senior Associate, Maurice Blackburn Michelle Lee, Lawyer, Gilbert + Tobin, Sydney Office Sunny Lee, Consultant, Gilbert + Tobin, Sydney Office Jane Leibowitz, Senior Solicitor, Asylum Seeker Health Rights Project, Public Interest Advocacy Centre Gemma Leigh-Dodds, Senior Associate, Slater and Gordon Lisa Lennon, Partner, Gilbert + Tobin, Sydney Office Haidee Leung, Lawyer, Gilbert + Tobin, Sydney Office Eugenia Levine, Victorian Bar Judith Levine, Independent Arbitrator Claudia Lewis, Lawyer, Gilbert + Tobin, Sydney Office Jessica Liang, Lawyer, Gilbert + Tobin, Sydney Office Associate Prof Terri Libesman, UTS Law Shari Liby, Principal, Slater and Gordon Monica Liesch, Associate, Maurice Blackburn Ffyona Livingstone Clark, Victorian Bar Nicole Lojszczyk, Lawyer, Gilbert + Tobin, Sydney Office Maryanne Loughnan QC, Victorian Bar Dr Trish Luker, Senior Lecturer, UTS Faculty of Law Roisin Lyng, Associate, Maurice Blackburn Therese MacDermott, Professor, Macquarie Law School, Macquarie University Edwina MacDonald, ACOSS Helen MacFarlane, Partner, Addisons Professor Jane McAdam, Scientia Professor of Law, UNSW Law Jessica McAvoy, Associate, Maurice Blackburn Katherine McCallum, Associate, Maurice Blackburn Dr Phillipa McCormack, School of Law, University of Tasmania Holly McCoy, Solicitor, InDIGO Program, Womens Legal Service (SA) Christiana McCudden, Partner, Gilbert + Tobin, Melbourne Office Jane McCullough, Senior Associate, Slater and Gordon Associate Professor Jani McCutcheon, University of Western Australia Law School Dr Fiona McDonald, Associate Professor, Faculty of Law, Queensland University of Technology Professor Jan McDonald, School of Law, University of Tasmania Dr Fiona McGaughey, UWA Law School Emily McGee, Paralegal, Maurice Blackburn Dr Carolyn McKay, Senior Lecture, The University of Sydney Law School Amelia McKellar, Lawyer, Gilbert + Tobin, Sydney Office Kathryn McKenzie, Executive Officer, Women Lawyers Association of NSW Sophie McKenzie, Lawyer, Maurice Blackburn Fiona McLeod AO SC, Victorian Bar Dr Kcasey McLoughlin, Newcastle Law School The Hon. Margaret McMurdo AC, former President of the Queensland Court of Appeal; Commissioner, Victorian Royal Commission into Management of Police Informants Dr Rebekah McWhirter, Faculty of Law, University of Tasmania Neeharika Maddula, Lawyer, Gilbert + Tobin, Sydney Office Sashi Maharaj QC, Victorian Bar Dr Felicity Maher, Senior Lecturer, University of Western Australia Law School; Barrister, Quayside Chambers, Perth Rebecca Mahoney, Knowledge Lawyer, Gilbert + Tobin, Sydney Office Shauna Mainprize, Lawyer, Gilbert + Tobin, Sydney Office Claire Mainsbridge, Lawyer, Maurice Blackburn Leah Marrone, Vice-President, Australian Women Lawyers Shanta Martin, Victorian Bar Professor Gail Mason, Sydney Law School, The University of Sydney Vavaa Mawuli, Principal Lawyer, Maurice Blackburn Caitlin Meade, Lawyer, Gilbert + Tobin, Sydney Office Lauren Meath, Graduate, Slater and Gordon Professor Denise Meyerson FAAL, Professor of Law, Macquarie Law School Heather Millar, Western Australian Bar Audrey Mills, Director, Dobson Mitchell Allport Lawyers and former President Australian Women Lawyers Lucy Minter, Associate, Maurice Blackburn Idil Mohamud, Lawyer, Slater and Gordon Jasmine Monastiriotis, Law Clerk, Maurice Blackburn Bethany Moore, Lawyer, Maurice Blackburn Victoria Moore, Paralegal, Maurice Blackburn Professor Jenny Morgan, Melbourne Law School, University of Law School Adrienne Morton, President, Australian Women Lawyers Idil Mohamud, Lawyer, Slater and Gordon Justine Munsie, Partner, Addisons Nikita Moyle, Associate, Maurice Blackburn Jennifer Mulheron, Lawyer, Gilbert + Tobin, Sydney Office Bridie Murphy, Associate, Maurice Blackburn Penny Murray, Partner, Addisons Professor Sarah Murray, University of Western Australia Professor Ngaire Naffine, Adelaide Law School Miranda Nagy, Principal Lawyer, Maurice Blackburn Ayesha Nathan, Law Clerk, Maurice Blackburn Marcia Neave Jane Needham SC, NSW Bar Dr Wendy Ng, Senior Lecturer, Melbourne Law School Dr Yee-Fui Ng, Senior Lecturer, Faculty of Law, Monash University Eileen Nguyen, Principal Lawyer, Slater and Gordon Distinguished Professor Dianne Nicol, Director of the Centre for Law and Genetics, Faculty of Law, University of Tasmania Associate Professor Jane Nielsen, Faculty of Law, University of Tasmania Associate Professor Jennifer Nielsen, School of Law and Justice, Southern Cross UniversityLaura Nigro, Lawyer, Slater and Gordon Annabelle Nilsson, Lawyer, Gilbert + Tobin, Sydney Office Gisela Nip, Deakin University, Judges Associate Kimi Nishimura, Principal Lawyer, Maurice Blackburn Professor Justine Nolan, UNSW Law Sarah Notarianni, Senior Associate, Maurice Blackburn Madeleine OBrien, Paralegal, Maurice Blackburn Anna OCallaghan, Victorian Bar Professor Ann OConnell, Melbourne Law School, University of Melbourne Associate Professor Karen OConnell, Faculty of Law, University of Technology Sydney Claire OConnor SC, South Australian Bar Elizabeth OShea, Senior Associate, Maurice Blackburn Dr Maria OSullivan, Faculty of Law, Monash University Dr Anna Olijnyk, Senior Lecturer, Adelaide Law School, The University of Adelaide Associate Professor Bronwyn Olliffe, Faculty of Law, University of Technology Sydney Hannah Opperman-Williams, Lawyer, Gilbert + Tobin, Sydney Office Emily Ormerod, Lawyer, Maurice Blackburn Professor Margaret Otlowski, Faculty of Law, University of Tasmania and Pro Vice Chancellor (Culture, Wellbeing and Sustainability); Patron, Tasmanian Womens Lawyers. Associate Professor Juliette Overland, Business Law, The University of Sydney Business School Isabel Owen, Lawyer, Gilbert + Tobin, Sydney Office Emerita Professor Rosemary Owens AO, The University of Adelaide Dr Tamsin Paige, Deakin Law School Ivana Pajic, Associate, Maurice Blackburn Kerry Palmer, Senior Associate, Maurice Blackburn Sophia Papadopoulos, Lawyer, Slater and Gordon Professor Christine Parker, Melbourne Law School, The University of Melbourne Professor Jeannie Marie Paterson, Co-Director for the Centre for AI and Digital Ethics, The University of Melbourne Suganya Pathanjalimanoharar, Victorian Bar Emma Pelka-Caven, Practice Group Leader, Slater and Gordon Jana Pennington, Associate, Maurice Blackburn Dr Tania Penovic, Senior Lecturer, Deputy Associate Dean (International), Monash University Elly Phelan, Lawyer, Gilbert + Tobin, Sydney Office Sarah Pickles, Solicitor, Family Violence Legal Service Aboriginal Corporation (SA) Clementine Pickwick, Lawyer, Gilbert + Tobin, Sydney Office Dr Sangeetha Pillai, UNSW Law Claire Pirie, Associate, Slater and Gordon Colleen Platford, Partner, Gilbert + Tobin, Sydney Office Rebecca Preston, Victorian Bar Diana Price, Victorian Bar Phoebe Prossor, Associate, Maurice Blackburn Paula Pulitano, Associate, Slater and Gordon Associate Professor Julia Quilter, School of Law, University of Wollongong Genevieve Rahman, Special Counsel, Gilbert + Tobin, Sydney Office Dr Sally Antionette Raine, Fremantle Law Pty Ltd Zoe Rathus AM, Senior Lecturer, Griffith Law School Jacqueline Reid, Lawyer, Gilbert + Tobin, Sydney Office Rhiannon Reid, Senior Associate, Maurice Blackburn Professor Catherine Renshaw, School of Law, Western Sydney University Professor Sharyn Roach Anleu FAAS, Flinders University Julie Robb, Partner, Banki Haddock Fiora Dr Hannah Robert, Senior Lecturer, La Trobe Law School Associate Professor Heather Roberts, ANU College of Law, ANU Natasha Roberts, Lawyer, Maurice Blackburn Carly Robertson, Victorian Bar Becci Robinson, Lawyer, Gilbert + Tobin, Melbourne Office Jane Robinson, Paralegal, Maurice Blackburn Sharni Robinson, Paralegal, Maurice Blackburn Dr Justine Rogers, UNSW Law Carrie Rome-Sievers, Victorian Bar Fiona Roughley, NSW Bar Professor Kim Rubenstein, FAAL, FASSA, Co-Director, 50/50 by 2030 Foundation, Faculty of Business Governance and Law, University of Canberra Professor Kristen Rundle, Melbourne Law School Dr Olivia Rundle, University of Tasmania Law School Erin Rutherford, Victorian Bar Dr Philippa Ryan, NSW Bar and ANU College of Law Gemma Saccasan, Law Graduate, Maurice Blackburn Professor Maree Sainsbury, University of Canberra Liberty Sanger, Principal Lawyer, Maurice Blackburn Dr Amanda Scardamaglia, Associate Professor and Department Chair, Faculty of Business and Law, Swinburne University of Technology Carolyn Scobie, General Counsel, QBE Insurance Group Associate Professor Kate Seear, Faculty of Law, Monash University, Practising Solicitor Jo Seto, Lawyer, Gilbert + Tobin, Sydney Office Rheya Shah, Lawyer, Gilbert + Tobin, Sydney Office Celeste Shambrook, Senior Associate, Maurice Blackburn Lauren Shave, Senior Associate, Gilbert + Tobin, Perth Office Kim Shaw, Principal Lawyer, Maurice Blackburn Anne Sheehan, Victorian Bar Dr Kym Sheehan, Sydney Law School, The University of Sydney Emily Shen, Lawyer, Gilbert + Tobin, Sydney Office Donna Short, Partner, Addisons Anne Shortall, Special Counsel, Slater and Gordon Dr Ronli Sifris, Senior Lecturer, Faculty of Law, Deputy Director, Castan Centre for Human Rights Law, Monash University Dr Natalie Silver, Faculty of Law, The University of Sydney Associate Professor Amelia Simpson, ANU Law School Zahra Sitou, Paralegal, Maurice Blackburn Professor Natalie Skead, Dean of Law, The University of Western Australia Nina Smart, Lawyer, Maurice Blackburn Verity Smith, Solicitor, Strategic Litigation, Public Interest Advocacy Centre Dr Laura Smith-Khan, Faculty of Law, University of Technology Sydney Anna Smyth, Lawyer, Gilbert + Tobin, Sydney Office Sarah Sorrell, Associate, Maurice Blackburn Professor Tania Sourdin, Dean and Head of School, Newcastle Law School Sarah Snowden, State Practice Group Leader, Slater and Gordon Dr Lisa Spagnolo, Senior Lecturer, Monash Law School Victoria Sparks, Associate, Slater and Gordon Dr Linda Steele, Senior Lecturer, Faculty of Law, University of Technology Sydney Molly Stephens, Lawyer, Maurice Blackburn Professor Natalie Stoianoff, Faculty of Law, University of Technology Sydney Nadia Stojanova, Victorian Bar Toni Stokes, Victorian Bar Dr Cait Storr, Chancellors Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Faculty of Law, University of Technology Sydney Tanya Straguszi, Principal Lawyer, Maurice Blackburn Emma Strugnell, Victorian Bar Professor Anita Stuhmcke, Faculty of Law, University of Technology Sydney Gabrielle Sumich, Lawyer, Gilbert + Tobin, Perth Office Lexi Sun, Lawyer, Gilbert + Tobin, Melbourne Office Dr Carolyn Tan, In-House Legal Counsel at Yamatji Marlpa Aboriginal Corporation Jessie E Taylor, Associate Director, Victoria Legal Aid Chambers. Dr Madeline Taylor, Sydney Law School Amy Teiwes, Paralegal, Maurice Blackburn Karin Temperley, Victoria Legal Aid Amy Tesoriero, UTS Law Graduate Associate Professor Shih-Ning Then, Law Faculty, Queensland University of Technology Rhea Thomas, Solicitor, Welfare Rights & Advocacy Service Amanda Thompson, President, Tasmanian Women Lawyers, Associate, Wallace Wilkinson & Webster Clare Thompson, Western Australian Bar, President of Women Lawyers of WA Emerita Professor Margaret Thornton, ANU College of Law, Australian National University Associate Professor Amelia Thorpe, UNSW Law Ellen Tilbury, Senior Solicitor, Public Interest Advocacy Centre Ltd Eleanor Toohey, Graduate, Slater and Gordon Jenny Tran, Senior Associate, Maurice Blackburn Charmaine Tsang, Director, Australian Women Lawyers; Immediate Past President Women Lawyers of Western Australia Dr Tamara Tulich, UWA Law School Andrea Turner, Associate, Maurice Blackburn Sarah Turner, Partner, Gilbert + Tobin, Perth Office Alison Umbers, Barrister and Mediator, Assistant Convenor of the Women Barristers Association Sarah Vallance, Senior Associate, Maurice Blackburn Kirsten Van Der Wal, Associate, Maurice Blackburn Ella van der Schans, Solicitor, Herbert Smith Freehills, Victorian Director of Australian Women Lawyers Dr Kate van Doore, Griffith Law School Sarah Varney, Victorian Bar Holly Veale, South Australian Bar Sarah Vo, Lawyer, Gilbert + Tobin, Sydney Office Dr Anthea Vogl, Faculty of Law, University of Technology Sydney Alexandra Volk, Lawyer, Maurice Blackburn Mackenzie Wakefield, Law Graduate, Maurice Blackburn Gayann Walker, Assistant Convenor of the Womens Barrister Association of the Victorian Bar Gillian Walker, South Australian Bar Samantha Walker, Associate, Maurice Blackburn Brighdin Walsh, Lawyer, Slater and Gordon Lorraine Walsh, Lawyer, Maurice Blackburn Dr Jane Wangmann, Faculty of Law UTS Stacey Ward, Lawyer, Gilbert + Tobin, Melbourne Office Juliana Warner, Managing Partner, Sydney Office, Herbert Smith Freehills, Dr Helen Watchirs OAM, ACT President and Human Rights Commissioner Nicole Watson, Senior Lecturer, Sydney Law School Tanya Watson, Senior Associate, Julian Johnson Lawyers Dr Kylie Weston-Scheuber, Victorian Bar Professor Sally Wheeler OBE, MRIA, FaCSS, Pro-Vice Chancellor for International Strategy and Dean, Robert Garran Professor of Law, ANU College of Law, Australian National University Jenni Whelan, Clinical Director, School of Law, Western Sydney University Janet Whiting, Partner, Gilbert + Tobin, Melbourne Office Nikki Whiting, Special Counsel, Maurice Blackburn Deborah Wiener, Victorian Bar Marie Wilkening-Le Brun, Victorian Bar Anita Will, Solicitor Kingsford Legal Centre UNSW Kerrie Wood, Lawyer, Maurice Blackburn Donna Woodleigh, Lawyer Aimee Woods, UTS Law Graduate Alice Woolven, Legal Support Officer, City of Casey Isabelle Wong, Lawyer, Gilbert + Tobin, Sydney Office Madeline Wu, Lawyer, Gilbert + Tobin, Sydney Office Angelika Yates, Partner, Addisons April Zahra, Lawyer, Slater and Gordon Jessica Zarkovic, Senior Associate, Slater and Gordon

Gabrielle Appleby, Professor, UNSW Law School, UNSW

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Deep cultural shifts required: open letter from 500 legal women calls for reform of way judges are appointed and disciplined - Women's Agenda