Category Archives: Quantum Computing

Cleveland Clinic and IBM Partner on HPC, AI and Quantum Computing – insideHPC

ARMONK, N.Y.andCLEVELAND Cleveland Clinicand IBM (NYSE:IBM) have announced a planned 10-year partnership to establish the Discovery Accelerator, a joint effort to advance the pace of discovery in healthcare and life sciences through the use of high performance computing on the hybrid cloud, artificial intelligence (AI) and quantum computing technologies.

The collaboration is anticipated to build a robust research and clinical infrastructure to empower big data medical research in ethical, privacy preserving ways, discoveries for patient care and novel approaches to public health threats such as the COVID-19 pandemic. Through the Discovery Accelerator,the researchers plan to use advanced computational technology to generate and analyze data to help enhance research in the newGlobal Center for Pathogen Research & Human Health,in areas such as: genomics, single cell transcriptomics, population health, clinical applications, and chemical and drug discovery.

Through this innovative collaboration, we have a unique opportunity to bring the future to life, saidTom Mihaljevic, M.D., CEO and President of Cleveland Clinic. These new computing technologies can help revolutionize discovery in the life sciences.The Discovery Accelerator will enable our renowned teams to build a forward-looking digital infrastructure and help transform medicine, while training the workforce of the future and potentially growing our economy.

The COVID-19 pandemic has spawned one of the greatest races in the history of scientific discovery one that demands unprecedented agility and speed, saidArvind Krishna, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of IBM. At the same time, science is experiencing a change of its own with high performance computing, hybrid cloud, data, AI, and quantum computing, being used in new ways to break through long-standing bottlenecks in scientific discovery. Our new collaboration with Cleveland Clinic will combine their world-renowned expertise in healthcare and life sciences with IBMs next-generation technologies to make scientific discovery faster, and the scope of that discovery larger than ever.

Quantum will make the impossible possible, and whenthe Governor and I announced the Cleveland Innovation District earlier this year, this was the kind of innovative investment I hoped it would advance, said Ohio Lt. GovernorJon Husted, Director of InnovateOhio. A partnership between these two great institutions will putCleveland, andOhio, on the map for advanced medical and scientific research, providing a unique opportunity to improve treatment options for patients and solve some of our greatest healthcare challenges.

The Discovery Accelerator will serve as the technology foundation for Cleveland Clinics newGlobal Center for Pathogen Research & Human Health,announced last month as part of theCleveland Innovation District. The center, supported by a$500 millioninvestment from theState of Ohio, Jobs Ohio and Cleveland Clinic, brings together a research team focused on broadening understanding of viral pathogens, virus-induced cancers, genomics, immunology and immunotherapies. It will build upon Cleveland Clinics existing programs and expertise, with newly recruited world leaders in immunology, cancer biology, immune-oncology and infectious disease research as well as technology development and education. Researchers will expand critical work on studying, preparing and protecting against emerging pathogens and virus-related diseases.

The pace of progress in science historically has been limited by bottlenecks. Researchers are increasingly working to overcome these bottlenecks with the application of AI, quantum computing and hybrid cloud technologies. New technologies are enabling accelerated methods of discovery that include deep search, AI and quantum-enriched simulation, generative models, and cloud-based AI-driven autonomous labs. Leveraging these combined innovations will supercharge new generations of information technology,fuel important advances in science, and IBM will provide access to a variety of research and commercial technologies, education and tools to assist Cleveland Clinic in accelerating discovery in healthcare and life science, includingRoboRXN, a cloud-based platform that combines AI models and robots to help scientists design and synthesize new molecules remotely; theIBM Functional Genomics Platform, a cloud-based repository and research tool, which uses novel approaches to reveal the molecular features in viral and bacterial genomes to help accelerate discovery of molecular targets required for drug design, test development and treatment;Deep Search,which helps researchers access structured and unstructured data quickly; andHigh-Performance Hybrid Cloud Computingtechnologies that can enable researchers to burst their workloads into the cloud and access the resources they need at scale.

Quantum computing has the potential to have an immense impact on key healthcare challenges, such as the discovery of new molecules that can serve as the basis of new pharmaceutical breakthroughs and spur the development of new medicines and could help enhance the ability to derive deep insight from complex data that is at the heart of some of the largest challenges in healthcare.

The Discovery Accelerator will leverage IBMs multi-year roadmap for advancing quantum computing, bringing its revolutionary capabilities into the hands of scientists and practitioners in healthcare and life sciences. In addition to an on-premises quantum system, Cleveland Clinic will also have access to IBMs fleet of currently more than 20 quantum systems, accessible via the cloud. IBM is targeting to unveil its first next generation 1,000+ qubit quantum system in 2023, and Cleveland Clinic is planned to be the site of the first private-sector on-premises system.

A significant pillar of the program plans to focus on educating the workforce of the future and creating jobs to grow the economy. The 10-year collaboration plans to include education and workforce development opportunities related to quantum computing.

The innovative educational curriculum will be designed for participants from high school to professional level and offer training and certification programs in data science and quantum computing, building the skilled workforce needed for cutting-edge data science research of the future. Cleveland Clinic and IBM plan to hold research symposia and workshops with joint sessions by IBM and academic researchersfor academia, industry, government and the general public.

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Cleveland Clinic and IBM Partner on HPC, AI and Quantum Computing - insideHPC

OneConnect Financial Technology and Singapore Management University announce key findings from joint research on potential for quantum computing to…

SINGAPORE, April 7, 2021 /PRNewswire/ -- OneConnect Financial Technology Co., Ltd. (OneConnect) the leading technology-as-a-service platform provider and an associate of Ping An Insurance Group, and Singapore Management University (SMU) today announced the key findings from a jointly conducted research on the potential of quantum computing to augment blockchain technology for businesses. The research report has been vetted by the Blockchain Association Singapore (BAS) and the findings were shared at the BAS webinar titled "Enterprise Blockchain in the New Decade" earlier today, moderated by Ms Tan Bin Ru, Co-Chairwoman of BAS, who is also CEO (SEA) of OneConnect Financial Technology.

The findings from this research follow an earlier Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between OneConnect and SMU in 2019 to develop a Proof of Concept (POC) to investigate the characteristics of quantum computing for distributed ledger technologies (DLTs). Co-led by Associate Professor Paul Griffin from SMU School of Computing and Information Systems, the report focused on studying quantum algorithms that could augment blockchain technology in the area of robust large-scale consensus.

While reviewing various types of consensus mechanisms and the suitability of quantum computing in business, the research has shown that the inherent constraints faced by classical DLTs known as the "blockchain trilemma", or the notion of improving all three fundamental attributes of blockchain speed, security and size at once could be broken by quantum technologies, thus increasing potential business usage. For current blockchains, a longer time is required to reach a consensus for highly secure DLTs, and increasing the speed of consensus leads to lower security.

The result findings from the research project include:

Ms Tan Bin Ru shared, "We are excited to be announcing the results and insights gathered from this joint research over the last one year it has indeed been a remarkable journey and a significant milestone that we are sharing with SMU today. Collaborations like these will allow us to better understand and lay the groundwork for the potentialof blockchain technology that can be applied to businesses in the future, such asimproving financing and the under-banked woes. We look forward to continuing long-term partnerships with educational institutes like SMU to potentially expand its usefulness in industry applications."

Associate Professor Paul Griffin, a speaker at the BAS webinar, shared, "It has been a wonderful journey with OneConnect to work on this exciting future-oriented research. The potential for quantum computing is just beginning to be explored and this project has helped to move this forward in a relevant area for the industry. SMU would like to thank all the people involved and look forward to continuing this and other research with OneConnect in the future."

Following the joint research, OneConnect and SMU will continue to forge partnerships in the areas of innovation and building talents for the digital economy.

About OneConnect Financial Technology

OneConnect Financial Technology Co., Ltd. (NYSE: OCFT) is a leading technology-as-a-service platform for financial institutions. The Company's platform provides cloud-native technology solutions that integrate extensive financial services industry expertise with market-leading technology. The Company's solutions provide technology applications and technology-enabled business services to financial institutions. Together they enable the Company's customers' digital transformations, which help them increase revenue, manage risks, improve efficiency, enhance service quality and reduce costs.

The Company's 13 technology solutions strategically cover multiple verticals in the financial services industry, including banking, insurance and asset management, across the full scope of their businesses from sales and marketing and risk management to customer services, as well as technology infrastructures such as data management, program development, and cloud services.

About Singapore Management University

A premier university in Asia, the Singapore Management University (SMU) is internationally recognised for its world-class research and distinguished teaching. Established in 2000, SMU's mission is to generate leading-edge research with global impact and to produce broad-based, creative and entrepreneurial leaders for the knowledge-based economy. SMU's education is known for its highly interactive, collaborative and project-based approach to learning.

Home to over 11,000 students across undergraduate, postgraduate professional and postgraduate research programmes, SMU comprises six schools: School of Accountancy, Lee Kong Chian School of Business, School of Economics, School of Computing and Information Systems, School of Law, and School of Social Sciences. SMU offers a wide range of bachelors', masters', and PhD degree programmes in the disciplinary areas associated with the six schools, as well as in multidisciplinary combinations of these areas.

SMU emphasises rigorous, high-impact, multi- and interdisciplinary research that addresses Asian issues of global relevance. SMU faculty members collaborate with leading international researchers and universities around the world, as well as with partners in the business community and public sector. SMU's city campus is a modern facility located in the heart of downtown Singapore, fostering strategic linkages with business, government and the wider community. http://www.smu.edu.sg

About Blockchain Association Singapore

The Blockchain Association Singapore (BAS) seeks to empower its members and the community to leverage blockchain and scalable technologies for business growth and transformation. The Association is designed to be an effective platform for members to engage with multiple stakeholders - both regional and international - to discover solutions and promote best practices in a collaborative, open, and transparent manner.

It aims to promote blockchain literacy and build a strong talent pipeline for the digital economy in Singapore. BAS also aims to accelerate the development of blockchain companies operating in or entering into Singapore, and their subsequent integration and acceleration into the Singapore blockchain ecosystem.

For more information, please visithttps://singaporeblockchain.org/.

SOURCE OneConnect

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OneConnect Financial Technology and Singapore Management University announce key findings from joint research on potential for quantum computing to...

Quantum computing: How basic broadband fiber could pave the way to the next breakthrough – ZDNet

Google's Sycamore quantum processor.

The usefulness of most quantum computers is still significantly limited by the low number of qubits that hardware can support. But simple fiber optic cables just like the ones used for broadband connections could be the answer.

A team of researchers from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) found that, with just a few tweaks,optical fiber can be used to communicate with the qubits sitting inside superconducting quantum computers, with the same level of accuracy as existing methods.

Unlike the metal wires currently used, it is easy to multiply the number of fiber optic cables in a single device, which means it is possible to communicate with more qubits. According to NIST, the findings pave the way to packing a million qubits into a quantum computer. Most devices currently support less than a hundred.

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Superconducting quantum computers, such as the ones that IBM and Google are building, require qubits to sit on a quantum processor that is cooled to a temperature of 15 milikelvin colder than outer space to protect the particles' extremely fragile quantum state.

But whether to control the qubits or measure them, researchers first need to communicate with the processor. This means a connection line must be established between room-temperature electronics and the cryogenic environment of the quantum circuit.

Typically, scientists use microwave pulses to communicate with qubits. With different frequencies and durations, the pulses can influence the state of the qubit; or researchers can look at the amplitude of the reflected microwave signal to "read" qubit-based information.

Microwave pulses are normally sent down to the ultra-cold qubits through coaxial metal cables. This comes with a practical problem: sets of metal cables can be used to connect with to up to 1,000 qubits, after which it becomes physically unworkable to build more wiring in a single system.

Yet companies have ambitious goals when it comes to scaling up quantum computers. IBM, for example, is expected to surpass the 1,000 qubit mark by 2023 with a processor called IBM Quantum Condor, and iseyeing a long-term goal of a million-qubit quantum system.

John Teufel, a researcher at NIST who worked on the institute's latest research, explains that coaxial metal cables won't cut it for much longer. "The focus of most real-life quantum computing efforts has been to push forward using conventional wiring methods," Teufel tells ZDNet.

"While this has not yet been the bottleneck for state-of-the-art systems, it will become important in the very near future...All the companies that are pursuing quantum-computing efforts are well aware that new breakthroughs will be required to reach their ultimate goal."

The researchers opted to replace metal cables with familiar optical fiber technology.

To address this issue, Teufel and his team at NIST opted to replace metal cables with familiar optical fiber technology, which, based on a glass or plastic core, was anticipated to carry a high volume of signals to the qubits without conducting heat.

Using conventional technology, the researchers converted microwave pulses into light signals that can be transported by the optical cables. Once the light particles reach the quantum processor, they are converted back into microwaves by cryogenic photodetectors, and then delivered to the qubit.

Optical fiber was used to both control and measure qubits, with promising results: the new set-up resulted in accurate rendering of the qubit's state 98% of the time, which is the same accuracy as obtained using regular coaxial lines.

Teufel and his team now envision a quantum processor in which light in optical fibers transmits a signal to and from the qubit, with each qubit talking to a wire. "Unlike conventional metal coaxial cables, the fiber itself is not the bottleneck for how many qubits you could talk to," says Teufel. "You could simply give each qubit a dedicated fiber through which to send signals, even for a million-qubit system. A million fibers seems feasible, while a million coaxial lines does not."

Another advantage of optical cable, notes Teufel, is the information carrying capacity of a single fiber, which is much greater than that of a metal cable. Many more signals up to several thousand can be sent through one optical wire, and the scientist envisions separating and re-routing those signals to different qubits in the processor. This would effectively enable a single fiber optic cable to talk to several qubits at once.

The experiment is yet to be carried out. In the meantime, Teufel is confident that all eyes will be on NIST's latest findings. "Novel wiring methods, like the one we have shown here, will eventually be required to maintain the incredible growth trajectory of quantum computing efforts," says Teufel.

"We do not suggest that our new method is the only long-term solution, but we are excited to see that this new idea looks incredibly promising. I expect that companies will be looking closely at this work to see if these new methods can be incorporated into their future strategies."

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Quantum computing: How basic broadband fiber could pave the way to the next breakthrough - ZDNet

Cleveland Clinic, IBM launch 10-year quantum computing partnership – Healthcare IT News

On Tuesday Cleveland Clinic announced a decade-long partnership with IBM, designed to harness the power of quantum computing for next-generation medical research.

WHY IT MATTERSWith the joint launch of their new Discovery Accelerator, Cleveland Clinic and IBM aim to expand the speed and scope of healthcare and life science research, they say, and hope to uncover innovative approaches to public health emergencies such as COVID-19.

Key to the new collaboration is installation of the first private-sector, on-premise IBM Quantum System One in the U.S. In addition to that on-campus deployment, Big Blue will also, in the years ahead install another next-generation 1,000-plus qubit quantum system at a client facility in Cleveland hopefully by 2023. The clinic will also have cloud access to more than 20 other IBM quantum systems.

Such computing power could enable big advances in data-intensive research areas such as genomics, single cell transcriptomics, population health and drug discovery, while also facilitating faster development of an array of new clinical applications.

Cleveland Clinic says the Discovery Accelerator will also provide a technology foundation for its new Global Center for Pathogen Research andHuman Health, first announced in January.

Together the health system and its partners at IBM hope that harnessing quantum computing, hybrid cloud technologies and artificial intelligence will enable faster gains from leading-edge innovationssuch as deep search, quantum-enriched simulation, generative models and cloud-based AI-driven autonomous labs.

Among the other IBM technologies made available to Cleveland Clinic areRoboRXN, a cloud platform to help scientists synthesize new molecules remotely with robots and AI algorithms, and the cloud-based IBM Functional Genomics Platform, designed to speed discovery of molecular targets required for drug design.

THE LARGER TRENDQuantum computing has shown big potential for many years that's only just starting to be tapped. Its enormous processing power could enable new breakthroughs in drug design and the development of new therapeutics.

Back in 2013, we offered an early look at what quantum computers could do for healthcare, and tried to explain in layman's terms just how they work.

Rather than binary 1/0 digital technology, quantum machines operate using quantum bits or qubits that can exist in what's referred to as "superposition." They can be ones or zeroes, or they can be in multiple states at once.

That means that powerful quantum computers can make multiple computations at once enabling speed and horsepower beyond even advanced conventional supercomputers.

Two years ago, as Google claimed it had achieved "quantum supremacy,"and IBM pushed back on that claim,we noted that, despite the enormous promise, real-world applications were still a bit further in the future.

"No one should be putting a down payment on a quantum computer today," said one developer we spoke with. "The methods used today in AI/ML are well understood and run reasonably fast on conventional computers."

Clearly, Cleveland Clinic thinks differently, and is investing now to position itself for big research breakthroughs in the near future.

Its 10-year partnership with IBM puts a focus on education, training and workforce development from high school to the professional level related to quantum computing, with the goal of creating new jobs in the Cleveland area.

"Quantum will make the impossible possible," said Ohio Lt. Governor Jon Husted, Director of InnovateOhio. "A partnership between these two great institutions will put Cleveland, and Ohio, on the map for advanced medical and scientific research, providing a unique opportunity to improve treatment options for patients and solve some of our greatest healthcare challenges."

ON THE RECORD"Through this innovative collaboration, we have a unique opportunity to bring the future to life," said Cleveland Clinic CEO Dr. Tom Mihaljevic, in a statement. "These new computing technologies can help revolutionize discovery in the life sciences. The Discovery Accelerator will enable our renowned teams to build a forward-looking digital infrastructure and help transform medicine, while training the workforce of the future and potentially growing our economy."

"The COVID-19 pandemic has spawned one of the greatest races in the history of scientific discovery one that demands unprecedented agility and speed," added IBM CEO Arvind Krishna. "At the same time, science is experiencing a change of its own with high performance computing, hybrid cloud, data, AI, and quantum computing, being used in new ways to break through long-standing bottlenecks in scientific discovery."

Twitter:@MikeMiliardHITNEmail the writer:mike.miliard@himssmedia.comHealthcare IT News is a HIMSS publication.

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Cleveland Clinic, IBM launch 10-year quantum computing partnership - Healthcare IT News

Honeywell says quantum computers will outpace standard verification in 18 to 24 months – VentureBeat

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Honeywell expects that as advances in quantum computing continue to accelerate over the next 18 to 24 months, the ability to replicate the results of a quantum computing application workload using a conventional computing platform simulation will come to an end.

The companys System Model H1 has now quadrupled its performance capabilities to become the first commercial quantum computer to attain a 512 quantum volume. Ascertaining quantum volume requires running a complex set of statistical tests that are influenced by the number of qubits, error rates, connectivity of qubits, and cross-talk between qubits. That approach provides a more accurate assessment of a quantum computers processing capability that goes beyond simply counting the number of qubits that can be employed.

Honeywell today provides access to a set of simulation tools that make it possible to validate the results delivered on its quantum computers on a conventional machine. Those simulations give organizations more confidence in quantum computing platforms by allowing them to compare results. However, quantum computers are now approaching a level where at some point between 2022 and 2023 that will no longer be possible, Honeywell Quantum Solutions president Tony Uttley said.

Honeywell has pursued an approach to quantum computing that differs from those of rivals by focusing its efforts on a narrower range of more stable qubits. Each system is based on a trapped-ion architecture that leverages numerous individual charged atoms (ions) to hold information. It then applies electromagnetic fields to hold (trap) each ion in a way that allows it to be manipulated and encoded using laser pulses.

The company makes its quantum computers available via a subscription to a cloud service and counts BMW, DHL, JP Morgan Chase, and Samsung among its customers. Systems residing outside of Boulder, Colorado and Minneapolis are made available to customers for up to two weeks at a time before being taken offline for two weeks to add additional capacity.

Subscriptions for the System Model H1 service are currently sold out, and each Honeywell quantum computing customer has previously tried to employ a different platform before switching to Honeywell, Uttley said. The company is now moving toward making a third-generation System Model H2 service available that will offer higher levels of unspecified quantum volume, Uttley added.

Honeywell has committed to delivering a tenfold increase in quantum volume every five years. The company has been able to deliver a fourfold increase in the amount of quantum volume it can make available in the last five months alone, Uttley said.

Quantum computers can process bits that have a value of both 0 and 1 at the same time, which makes them more powerful than conventional computing platforms. Advances in quantum computing, however, will by no means signal the demise of conventional computers, Uttley added. Instead, its becoming apparent that quantum computers and conventional computers are simply going to be better suited to running different classes of workloads, Uttley said.

These systems will run side by side for decades, Uttley added. Conventional computing platforms are not going to be replaced anytime soon.

Quantum computers, however, are better suited to addressing complex computational challenges involving chemistry, routing optimizations using, for example, logistics and traffic management applications, and even the training of AI models. In the latter case, a quantum computer can identify the starting point for the training of an AI model that would then be completed by a conventional computer. Other more intractable problems involving, for example, applications for ways to reduce the level of carbon in the atmosphere are only feasible to run on a quantum computing platform.

It may still be a while before quantum computing delivers on its full promise, but while the way quantum systems work may not be widely understood, there is now no turning back.

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Honeywell says quantum computers will outpace standard verification in 18 to 24 months - VentureBeat

IBM’s first ‘retail’ quantum computer in the US headed to Cleveland Clinic – CNET

IBM Q System One is a 53-qubit quantum computer.

IBM on Monday announced a 10-year partnership with Cleveland Clinic to develop the Discovery Accelerator, a lab that will research health care and life sciences using quantum computing and artificial intelligence. As part of the partnership, IBM will install its first ever private sector IBM Quantum System One in the US at the clinic's campus in Cleveland.

The quantum computer will help "transform medicine," Dr. Tom Mihaljevic, CEO of Cleveland Clinic, said in a statement. "These new computing technologies can help revolutionize discovery in the life sciences."

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Some of the research will look at genomics, chemical and drug discovery, single cell transcriptomics, population health and clinical applications. Researchers will also look at protecting privacy while using big data to improve patient care and responses to global health crises such as COVID-19.

IBM said it will also install its first next-generation 1,000+ qubit quantum system at a client facility in Cleveland in the next few years.

IBM last month unveiled improvements to quantum computing software that it said will increase performance by 100 times.

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IBM's first 'retail' quantum computer in the US headed to Cleveland Clinic - CNET

Cleveland Clinic, IBM ink a ten-year quantum computing dealhere are 2 ways the tech can be used in healthcare – eMarketer

The news: Cleveland Clinic and IBM struck a ten-year partnership to use AI and quantum computing tech to facilitate healthcare research initiatives, like precision medicine and drug discovery. As part of the deal, Cleveland Clinic will get to install IBMs first private sector quantum computing system.

Heres how it works: Quantum computers process information in a different way than traditional computers: For example, quantum algorithms can outperform regular computers in tackling issues like drug discovery, running searches through all possible molecules at rapid speeds.

Why this could succeed: It appears IBM is learning from its shuttered Watson Health venture: Instead of tackling a wide variety of AI problems, its narrowing its focus on cloud computing.

The bigger picture: Quantum computings presence in healthcare is still unfoldingbesides drug discovery, hospitals could leverage the tech for two key use cases:

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Cleveland Clinic, IBM ink a ten-year quantum computing dealhere are 2 ways the tech can be used in healthcare - eMarketer

Cleveland Clinic will be IBMs first private sector customer to install a quantum computer on premises – VentureBeat

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IBM today announced it is installing a quantum computer at the Cleveland Clinic, marking the first time the company has physically placed this next-generation system on the premises of a private sector client.

The move marks yet another step forward for quantum computing. It comes as part of a broader 10-year partnership between IBM and the clinic that includes hybrid cloud service and AI.

According to IBM Quantum Network director Dr. Anthony J. Annunziata, including a quantum computer as part of that suite of tools is critical because the company wants to understand which tasks are best suited to quantum computations. Despite rapid advances, quantum computers are still in their infancy, but its still possible they could be more efficient at limited tasks.

The Cleveland Clinic will have the full capacity of a quantum system we purpose-built for them, Annunziata said. Well have a much better ability to integrate it into their existing infrastructure. There will be benefits in doing that as we figure out how quantum can address these really tough problems and also how it can accelerate the application of AI.

The partners have dubbed the program the Discovery Accelerator, and its overall goal is to power new breakthroughs in health care and life sciences. IBMs computing tools are being leveraged to better harness the clinics wealth of data, including genomics, single-cell transcriptomics, population health, clinical applications, and chemical and drug discovery, according to a press release.

The eye-catching part of the announcement, however, is the move to physically place a quantum computer at the clinic. Until now, the company has been focused on its IBM Q Network, a consortium of research and business partners who can experiment with quantum computing via a cloud-based service. IBM has grown increasingly optimistic about quantums potential and has laid out an ambitious timetable for expanding commercial applications.

That will now include its first on-premises Quantum System One in the United States outside of an IBM computation center. IBM currently has a quantum computer on its own campus, as well as one at Germanys Fraunhofer Institute and the University of Tokyo. The Cleveland Clinic is the first private sector client and the first in the U.S.

Annunziata said the clinic will make for a good first private partner, thanks to its recently announced Global Center for Pathogen Research & Human Health. The new center will assemble teams to focus on viral pathogens, virus-induced cancers, genomics, immunology, and immunotherapies.

If there is anything that we can do as a technology partner to help institutions with the mission to advance life sciences and health care, were very happy to do it, he said.

In many cases, researchers feel progress in these areas is being limited by the ability to gather and analyze massive datasets. The clinic is betting that a system that combines AI, quantum computing, and hybridcloud technologies will remove those hurdles and unleash new health care innovation.

Annunziata said part of the work will be to learn just where quantum computing sits in that computing system. Quantum is not robust enough to replace all computing functions. And even in many best-case scenarios, researchers believe quantum computing will be best suited for particular functions.

Health care has long been touted as a strong potential use case. Quantum proponents are betting that such computers will be able to develop more sophisticated models of the human body, allowing for the development of better hypotheses for designing experiments, as well as models that speed the testing of new drugs.

The key is learning which tasks in the Cleveland system can be offloaded to the quantum computer with the results then fed back into the classic computing architecture, Annunziata said.

At the same time, the Cleveland Clinic partnership will provide an opportunity to train a quantum workforce for the coming years as more commercial partners look for such skillsets.

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Cleveland Clinic will be IBMs first private sector customer to install a quantum computer on premises - VentureBeat

Cleveland Clinic and IBM hope their tech partnership could help prevent the next pandemic – WXII The Triad

Video above: CDC director warns of 'impending doom' if U.S. eases COVID-19 restrictionsAfter a year in which scientists raced to understand COVID-19 and develop treatments and vaccines to stop its spread, Cleveland Clinic is partnering with IBM to use next-generation technologies to advance health care research and potentially prevent the next public health crisis.The two organizations on Tuesday announced the creation of the "Discovery Accelerator," which will apply technologies such as quantum computing and artificial intelligence to pressing life sciences research questions. As part of the partnership, Cleveland Clinic will become the first private-sector institution to buy and operate an on-site IBM quantum computer, called the Q System One. Currently, such machines only exist in IBM labs and data centers.Quantum computing is expected to expedite the rate of discovery and help tackle problems with which existing computers struggle.The accelerator is part of Cleveland Clinic's new Global Center for Pathogen Research & Human Health, a facility introduced in January on the heels of a $500 million investment by the clinic, the state of Ohio and economic development nonprofit JobsOhio to spur innovation in the Cleveland area.The new center is dedicated to researching and developing treatments for viruses and other disease-causing organisms. That will include some research on COVID-19, including why it causes ongoing symptoms (also called "long Covid") for some who have been infected."Covid-19 is an example" of how the center and its new technologies will be used, said Dr. Lara Jehi, chief research information officer at the Cleveland Clinic."But ... what we want is to prevent the next COVID-19," Jehi told CNN Business. "Or if it happens, to be ready for it so that we don't have to, as a country, put everything on hold and put all of our resources into just treating this emergency. We want to be proactive and not reactive."The promise of quantumQuantum computers process information in a fundamentally different way from regular computers, so they will be able to solve problems that today's computers can't. They can, for example, test multiple solutions to a problem at once, making it possible to come up with an answer in a fraction of the time it would take a different machine.Applied to health care research, that capability is expected to be useful for modeling molecules and how they interact, which could accelerate the development of new pharmaceuticals. Quantum computers could also improve genetic sequencing to help with cancer research, and design more efficient, effective clinical trials for new drugs, Jehi said.Ultimately, Cleveland Clinic and IBM expect that applying quantum and other advanced technologies to health care research will speed up the rate of discovery and product development. Currently, the average time from scientific discovery in a lab to getting a drug to a patient is around 17 years, according to the National Institutes of Health."We really need to accelerate," Jehi said. "What we learned with the COVID-19 pandemic is that we cannot afford, as a human race, to just drop everything and focus on one emergency at a time."Part of the problem: It takes a long time to process and analyze the massive amount of data generated by health care, research and trials something that AI, quantum computing and high-performance computing (a more powerful version of traditional computing) can help with. Quantum computers do that by "simulating the world," said Dario Gil, director of IBM Research."Instead of conducting physical experiments, you're conducting them virtually, and because you're doing them virtually through computers, it's much faster," Gil said.What this means for IBMFor IBM, the partnership represents an important proof point for commercial applications of quantum computing. IBM currently offers access to quantum computers via the cloud to 134 institutions, including Goldman Sachs and Daimler, but building a dedicated machine on-site for one organization is a big step forward."What we're seeing is the emergency of quantum as a new industry within the world of information technology and computing," Gil said. "What we're seeing here in the context of Cleveland Clinic is ... a partner that says, 'I want the entire capacity of a full quantum computer to be to my research mission."The partnership also includes a training element that will help educate people on how to use quantum computing for research which is likely to further grow the ecosystem around the new technology.Cleveland Clinic and IBM declined to detail the cost of the quantum system being installed on the clinic's campus, but representatives from both organizations called it a "significant investment." Quantum computers are complex machines to build and maintain because they must be stored at extremely cold temperatures (think: 200 times colder than outer space).The Cleveland Clinic will start by using IBM's quantum computing cloud offering while waiting for its on-premises machine to be built, which is expected to take about a year. IBM plans to later install at the clinic a more advanced version of its quantum computer once it is developed in the coming years.Jehi, the Cleveland Clinic research lead, acknowledged that quantum computing technology is still nascent, but said the organization wanted to get in on the ground floor."It naturally needs nurturing and growing so that we can figure out what are its applications in health care," Jehi said. "It was important to us that we design those applications and we learn them ourselves, rather than waiting for others to develop them."

Video above: CDC director warns of 'impending doom' if U.S. eases COVID-19 restrictions

After a year in which scientists raced to understand COVID-19 and develop treatments and vaccines to stop its spread, Cleveland Clinic is partnering with IBM to use next-generation technologies to advance health care research and potentially prevent the next public health crisis.

The two organizations on Tuesday announced the creation of the "Discovery Accelerator," which will apply technologies such as quantum computing and artificial intelligence to pressing life sciences research questions. As part of the partnership, Cleveland Clinic will become the first private-sector institution to buy and operate an on-site IBM quantum computer, called the Q System One. Currently, such machines only exist in IBM labs and data centers.

Quantum computing is expected to expedite the rate of discovery and help tackle problems with which existing computers struggle.

The accelerator is part of Cleveland Clinic's new Global Center for Pathogen Research & Human Health, a facility introduced in January on the heels of a $500 million investment by the clinic, the state of Ohio and economic development nonprofit JobsOhio to spur innovation in the Cleveland area.

The new center is dedicated to researching and developing treatments for viruses and other disease-causing organisms. That will include some research on COVID-19, including why it causes ongoing symptoms (also called "long Covid") for some who have been infected.

"Covid-19 is an example" of how the center and its new technologies will be used, said Dr. Lara Jehi, chief research information officer at the Cleveland Clinic.

"But ... what we want is to prevent the next COVID-19," Jehi told CNN Business. "Or if it happens, to be ready for it so that we don't have to, as a country, put everything on hold and put all of our resources into just treating this emergency. We want to be proactive and not reactive."

Quantum computers process information in a fundamentally different way from regular computers, so they will be able to solve problems that today's computers can't. They can, for example, test multiple solutions to a problem at once, making it possible to come up with an answer in a fraction of the time it would take a different machine.

Applied to health care research, that capability is expected to be useful for modeling molecules and how they interact, which could accelerate the development of new pharmaceuticals. Quantum computers could also improve genetic sequencing to help with cancer research, and design more efficient, effective clinical trials for new drugs, Jehi said.

Ultimately, Cleveland Clinic and IBM expect that applying quantum and other advanced technologies to health care research will speed up the rate of discovery and product development. Currently, the average time from scientific discovery in a lab to getting a drug to a patient is around 17 years, according to the National Institutes of Health.

"We really need to accelerate," Jehi said. "What we learned with the COVID-19 pandemic is that we cannot afford, as a human race, to just drop everything and focus on one emergency at a time."

Part of the problem: It takes a long time to process and analyze the massive amount of data generated by health care, research and trials something that AI, quantum computing and high-performance computing (a more powerful version of traditional computing) can help with. Quantum computers do that by "simulating the world," said Dario Gil, director of IBM Research.

"Instead of conducting physical experiments, you're conducting them virtually, and because you're doing them virtually through computers, it's much faster," Gil said.

For IBM, the partnership represents an important proof point for commercial applications of quantum computing. IBM currently offers access to quantum computers via the cloud to 134 institutions, including Goldman Sachs and Daimler, but building a dedicated machine on-site for one organization is a big step forward.

"What we're seeing is the emergency of quantum as a new industry within the world of information technology and computing," Gil said. "What we're seeing here in the context of Cleveland Clinic is ... a partner that says, 'I want the entire capacity of a full quantum computer to be [dedicated] to my research mission."

The partnership also includes a training element that will help educate people on how to use quantum computing for research which is likely to further grow the ecosystem around the new technology.

Cleveland Clinic and IBM declined to detail the cost of the quantum system being installed on the clinic's campus, but representatives from both organizations called it a "significant investment." Quantum computers are complex machines to build and maintain because they must be stored at extremely cold temperatures (think: 200 times colder than outer space).

The Cleveland Clinic will start by using IBM's quantum computing cloud offering while waiting for its on-premises machine to be built, which is expected to take about a year. IBM plans to later install at the clinic a more advanced version of its quantum computer once it is developed in the coming years.

Jehi, the Cleveland Clinic research lead, acknowledged that quantum computing technology is still nascent, but said the organization wanted to get in on the ground floor.

"It naturally needs nurturing and growing so that we can figure out what are its applications in health care," Jehi said. "It was important to us that we design those applications and we learn them ourselves, rather than waiting for others to develop them."

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Cleveland Clinic and IBM hope their tech partnership could help prevent the next pandemic - WXII The Triad

Cleveland Clinic and IBM announce 10-year partnership; includes first quantum computer for healthcare research – WKYC.com

The Discovery Accelerator will aim to advance "the pace of discovery in healthcare and life sciences."

CLEVELAND Editor's note: the video in the player above is from March 26, 2021.

The Cleveland Clinic and IBM have announced a 10-year partnership that will see the creation of a new center aimed at advancing the pace of "discovery in healthcare and life sciences through the use of high performance computing on the hybrid cloud, artificial intelligence (AI) and quantum computing technologies."

The center, the Discovery Accelerator, will serve as "a robust research and clinical infrastructure to empower big data medical research in ethical, privacy preserving ways, discoveries for patient care and novel approaches to public health threats such as the COVID-19 pandemic." It will also see IBM install its first private sector, on-premises IBM Quantum System One in the United States, on the Cleveland Clinic's campus in Cleveland, with additional plans to install the first of IBMs next-generation 1,000+ qubit quantum systems at a client facility in Cleveland in the coming years.

The quantum program will be aimed at actively engaging entities including universities, government, industry and startups. It will also "leverage Cleveland Clinics global enterprise to serve as the foundation of a new quantum ecosystem for life sciences, focused on advancing quantum skills and the mission of the center."

Through this innovative collaboration, we have a unique opportunity to bring the future to life, said Tom Mihaljevic, M.D., CEO and President of Cleveland Clinic. These new computing technologies can help revolutionize discovery in the life sciences. The Discovery Accelerator will enable our renowned teams to build a forward-looking digital infrastructure and help transform medicine, while training the workforce of the future and potentially growing our economy.

Added Arvind Krishna, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of IBM: The COVID-19 pandemic has spawned one of the greatest races in the history of scientific discovery one that demands unprecedented agility and speed. At the same time, science is experiencing a change of its own with high performance computing, hybrid cloud, data, AI, and quantum computing, being used in new ways to break through long-standing bottlenecks in scientific discovery. Our new collaboration with Cleveland Clinic will combine their world-renowned expertise in healthcare and life sciences with IBMs next-generation technologies to make scientific discovery faster, and the scope of that discovery larger than ever."

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Cleveland Clinic and IBM announce 10-year partnership; includes first quantum computer for healthcare research - WKYC.com