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It was a lovely, deep sense that God is part of everything – Eternity News

Faith Stories with Naomi Reed | April 1st, 2020 02:39 PM |

Im not the sort of person who likes to find individual Bible verses to fit my own situations. Im cautious like that. How do I know for sure what God had in mind? But there was one time, in 2009, [when] my sister was diagnosed with breast cancer. She had a lot of treatment, and she seemed to be doing better, so they decided to come to visit us on the farm. That particular day, wed been taking photos outside, and then we sat on the front porch and a huge wedge-tailed eagle flew over the house. It stayed above us for ages, circling the house. It was a beautiful moment. My sister left us two days later, but she lost consciousness on the way home. She died the next day in hospital. I never saw her again. It was awful, on so many levels. I cant even tell you about it. At her funeral, though, we used the verse from Isaiah, But those who hope in the Lord will renew their strength. They will soar on wings like eagles; they will run and not grow weary, they will walk and not be faint. (Isaiah 40:31). It was true. Through that whole time, my sister had been so sick, and lacking in physical strength, but she had such an assurance of her faith in God. She was deeply faithful, even at the end. She ministered to so many people. But thats not all. Six years later, my dad died, from prostate cancer. It was so hard so much loss. But he held onto his faith too, till the end, in his quiet way. As we walked out of the church, with his coffin wouldnt you know it? There was the most extraordinary wedge-tailed eagle, flying over the church. Everybody talked about it, afterwards. It was a lovely, deep sense that God was part of everything. It was almost like a spiritual confirmation of a physical thing. Theyd both been so tired, but they held onto their faith till the end, and their lives impacted so many people. And now for me, theres a deep sense that its okay. God is sovereign. Even when things seem crap, we hang on, because we know that he gives us strength.

Anne-Louises story is part of Eternitys Faith Stories series, compiled by Naomi Reed. Click here for more Faith Stories.

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It was a lovely, deep sense that God is part of everything - Eternity News

The deep leadership flaw revealed by Trump touting his coronavirus press conference ratings – CNN

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Andrew Cuomo addressed the news that his brother and CNN anchor Chris Cuomo tested positive for coronavirus saying "there is a lesson in this."","descriptionText":"New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo addressed the news that his brother and CNN anchor Chris Cuomo tested positive for coronavirus saying "there is a lesson in this.""},{"title":"Trump adviser: Politics has no place in this crisis","duration":"13:03","sourceName":"CNN","sourceLink":"amanpour.com","videoCMSUrl":"/video/data/3.0/video/world/2020/03/31/david-urban-trump-coronavirus-leadership.cnn/index.xml","videoId":"world/2020/03/31/david-urban-trump-coronavirus-leadership.cnn","videoImage":"//cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/200331122756-david-urban-trump-coronavirus-leadership-00055625-large-169.jpg","videoUrl":"/videos/world/2020/03/31/david-urban-trump-coronavirus-leadership.cnn/video/playlists/this-week-in-politics/","description":"David Urban, senior adviser to the Trump 2020 campaign, discusses the President's leadership during the coronavirus crisis","descriptionText":"David Urban, senior adviser to the Trump 2020 campaign, discusses the President's leadership during the coronavirus crisis"},{"title":"See Acosta quote Trump's past coronavirus claims to him ","duration":"04:17","sourceName":"CNN","sourceLink":"https://www.cnn.com/","videoCMSUrl":"/video/data/3.0/video/politics/2020/03/30/trump-coronavirus-acosta-question-sot-vpx.cnn/index.xml","videoId":"politics/2020/03/30/trump-coronavirus-acosta-question-sot-vpx.cnn","videoImage":"//cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/200330183739-acosta-trump-split-coronavirus-briefing-3-30-large-169.jpg","videoUrl":"/videos/politics/2020/03/30/trump-coronavirus-acosta-question-sot-vpx.cnn/video/playlists/this-week-in-politics/","description":"President Donald Trump criticized CNN's Jim Acosta for asking how Trump would defend his past statements that downplayed the coronavirus in the early phases of the US outbreak. ","descriptionText":"President Donald Trump criticized CNN's Jim Acosta for asking how Trump would defend his past statements that downplayed the coronavirus in the early phases of the US outbreak. "},{"title":"CNN poll: US divided on government response to coronavirus","duration":"01:10","sourceName":"CNN","sourceLink":"https://www.cnn.com/","videoCMSUrl":"/video/data/3.0/video/politics/2020/03/30/trump-approval-rating-coronavirus-pandemic-cnn-poll-lead-tapper-vpx.cnn/index.xml","videoId":"politics/2020/03/30/trump-approval-rating-coronavirus-pandemic-cnn-poll-lead-tapper-vpx.cnn","videoImage":"//cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/200130165125-corona-virus-cdc-image-large-169.jpg","videoUrl":"/videos/politics/2020/03/30/trump-approval-rating-coronavirus-pandemic-cnn-poll-lead-tapper-vpx.cnn/video/playlists/this-week-in-politics/","description":"CNN's u003ca href="/profiles/jake-tapper-profile" target="_blank">Jake Tapper u003c/a>shares the latest numbers from a CNN poll showing how Americans feel about the federal government's response to the novel coronavirus pandemic. ","descriptionText":"CNN's u003ca href="/profiles/jake-tapper-profile" target="_blank">Jake Tapper u003c/a>shares the latest numbers from a CNN poll showing how Americans feel about the federal government's response to the novel coronavirus pandemic. "},{"title":"Specialist sounds alarm about hospital capacity in rural US","duration":"01:42","sourceName":"CNN","sourceLink":"https://www.cnn.com","videoCMSUrl":"/video/data/3.0/video/us/2020/03/30/sepkowitz-covid-19-pandemic-rural-america-medical-system-sot-nr-vpx.cnn/index.xml","videoId":"us/2020/03/30/sepkowitz-covid-19-pandemic-rural-america-medical-system-sot-nr-vpx.cnn","videoImage":"//cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/200330110511-sepkowitz-covid-19-pandemic-rural-america-medical-system-sot-nr-vpx-00000000-large-169.jpg","videoUrl":"/videos/us/2020/03/30/sepkowitz-covid-19-pandemic-rural-america-medical-system-sot-nr-vpx.cnn/video/playlists/this-week-in-politics/","description":"Infectious disease specialist Dr. Kent Sepkowitz explains that the way the healthcare system is built in rural America "will not work" to fight the coronavirus pandemic. ","descriptionText":"Infectious disease specialist Dr. Kent Sepkowitz explains that the way the healthcare system is built in rural America "will not work" to fight the coronavirus pandemic. "},{"title":"King: Trump could share facts, instead he floats conspiracies","duration":"02:58","sourceName":"CNN","sourceLink":"https://www.cnn.com/","videoCMSUrl":"/video/data/3.0/video/politics/2020/03/30/trump-where-are-masks-going-sot-king-ip-vpx.cnn/index.xml","videoId":"politics/2020/03/30/trump-where-are-masks-going-sot-king-ip-vpx.cnn","videoImage":"//cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/200330132730-john-king-trump-split-large-169.jpg","videoUrl":"/videos/politics/2020/03/30/trump-where-are-masks-going-sot-king-ip-vpx.cnn/video/playlists/this-week-in-politics/","description":"President Donald Trump questioned the use of masks in New York hospitals, and u003ca href="https://www.cnn.com/2020/03/30/politics/trump-coronavirus-sunday-white-house/index.html" target="_blank">suggested without evidenceu003c/a> that the masks might be "going out the back door."","descriptionText":"President Donald Trump questioned the use of masks in New York hospitals, and u003ca href="https://www.cnn.com/2020/03/30/politics/trump-coronavirus-sunday-white-house/index.html" target="_blank">suggested without evidenceu003c/a> that the masks might be "going out the back door.""},{"title":"Watch Trump's evolution on coronavirus response ","duration":"03:26","sourceName":"CNN","sourceLink":"","videoCMSUrl":"/video/data/3.0/video/politics/2020/03/18/president-trump-evolution-coronavirus-response-jm-orig.cnn/index.xml","videoId":"politics/2020/03/18/president-trump-evolution-coronavirus-response-jm-orig.cnn","videoImage":"//cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/200318141020-05-trump-coronavirus-presser-0318-large-169.jpg","videoUrl":"/videos/politics/2020/03/18/president-trump-evolution-coronavirus-response-jm-orig.cnn/video/playlists/this-week-in-politics/","description":"President Trump's comments about the coronavirus have evolved since the first confirmed US case on January 22. CNN's tally of cases is based on records from the CDC, as well as local and state agencies. u003ca href="http://www.cnn.com/specials/health/coronavirus-videos-latest" target="_blank">Watch the latest videos on Covid-19.u003c/a>","descriptionText":"President Trump's comments about the coronavirus have evolved since the first confirmed US case on January 22. CNN's tally of cases is based on records from the CDC, as well as local and state agencies. u003ca href="http://www.cnn.com/specials/health/coronavirus-videos-latest" target="_blank">Watch the latest videos on Covid-19.u003c/a>"},{"title":"Dr. Fauci: Trump 'got it right away' when he saw the data","duration":"02:25","sourceName":"CNN","sourceLink":"http://www.cnn.com/","videoCMSUrl":"/video/data/3.0/video/health/2020/03/30/dr-anthony-fauci-social-distancing-trump-coronavirus-invt-sot-newday-vpx.cnn/index.xml","videoId":"health/2020/03/30/dr-anthony-fauci-social-distancing-trump-coronavirus-invt-sot-newday-vpx.cnn","videoImage":"//cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/200330074220-fauci-new-day-03302020-large-169.jpg","videoUrl":"/videos/health/2020/03/30/dr-anthony-fauci-social-distancing-trump-coronavirus-invt-sot-newday-vpx.cnn/video/playlists/this-week-in-politics/","description":"President Donald Trump "got it right away" when presented with data about the rise in coronavirus cases, which influenced his decision to extend social distancing guidelines, Dr. Anthony Fauci, the nation's top infectious disease expert, said on CNN.","descriptionText":"President Donald Trump "got it right away" when presented with data about the rise in coronavirus cases, which influenced his decision to extend social distancing guidelines, Dr. Anthony Fauci, the nation's top infectious disease expert, said on CNN."},{"title":"Tapper to GOP gov.: Does your state think this is a hoax?","duration":"00:51","sourceName":"CNN","sourceLink":"https://www.cnn.com/","videoCMSUrl":"/video/data/3.0/video/politics/2020/03/29/nebraska-governor-pete-ricketts-trump-coronavirus-sotu-vpx.cnn/index.xml","videoId":"politics/2020/03/29/nebraska-governor-pete-ricketts-trump-coronavirus-sotu-vpx.cnn","videoImage":"//cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/200329111612-tapper-pete-rickets-3-29-2020-large-169.jpg","videoUrl":"/videos/politics/2020/03/29/nebraska-governor-pete-ricketts-trump-coronavirus-sotu-vpx.cnn/video/playlists/this-week-in-politics/","description":"CNN's Jake Tapper speaks with Gov. Pete Ricketts (R-NE) about Nebraska's battle with the coronavirus outbreak as well as President Trump's response to the pandemic.","descriptionText":"CNN's Jake Tapper speaks with Gov. Pete Ricketts (R-NE) about Nebraska's battle with the coronavirus outbreak as well as President Trump's response to the pandemic."},{"title":"Louisiana governor's staffer dies of virus complications","duration":"00:46","sourceName":"CNN","sourceLink":"http://www.cnn.com","videoCMSUrl":"/video/data/3.0/video/politics/2020/03/29/lousiana-staffer-april-dunn-governor-sot-vpx.cnn/index.xml","videoId":"politics/2020/03/29/lousiana-staffer-april-dunn-governor-sot-vpx.cnn","videoImage":"//cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/200329031238-02-april-dunn-large-169.jpg","videoUrl":"/videos/politics/2020/03/29/lousiana-staffer-april-dunn-governor-sot-vpx.cnn/video/playlists/this-week-in-politics/","description":" A 33-year-old member of Louisiana Gov. John Bel Edwards' staff, April Dunn, died due to complications from coronavirus.","descriptionText":" A 33-year-old member of Louisiana Gov. John Bel Edwards' staff, April Dunn, died due to complications from coronavirus."},{"title":"Pelosi: Trump fiddles as people are dying","duration":"02:38","sourceName":"CNN","sourceLink":"https://www.cnn.com/","videoCMSUrl":"/video/data/3.0/video/politics/2020/03/29/nancy-pelosi-trump-coronavirus-response-sotu-vpx.cnn/index.xml","videoId":"politics/2020/03/29/nancy-pelosi-trump-coronavirus-response-sotu-vpx.cnn","videoImage":"//cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/200329090237-pelosi-sotu-3-29-2020-large-169.jpg","videoUrl":"/videos/politics/2020/03/29/nancy-pelosi-trump-coronavirus-response-sotu-vpx.cnn/video/playlists/this-week-in-politics/","description":"In an interview with CNN's Jake Tapper, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi says President Trump's response at the beginning of the coronavirus pandemic has been deadly.","descriptionText":"In an interview with CNN's Jake Tapper, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi says President Trump's response at the beginning of the coronavirus pandemic has been deadly."}],'js-video_headline-featured-1vswswu','',"js-video_source-featured-1vswswu",true,true,'this-week-in-politics');if (typeof configObj.context !== 'string' || configObj.context.length

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The deep leadership flaw revealed by Trump touting his coronavirus press conference ratings - CNN

New Google Assistant readying Shortcuts and built-in list of supported apps – 9to5Google

The new Google Assistant launched with the Pixel 4 last October and has expanded to more users since then. A look into Google app 11.3 reveals work on Assistant Shortcuts to let you create voice macros for supported apps.

About APK Insight: In this APK Insight post, weve decompiled the latest version of an application that Google uploaded to the Play Store. When we decompile these files (called APKs, in the case of Android apps), were able to see various lines of code within that hint at possible future features. Keep in mind that Google may or may not ever ship these features, and our interpretation of what they are may be imperfect. Well try to enable those that are closer to being finished, however, to show you how theyll look in the case that they do ship. With that in mind, read on.

It starts with the big revamp coming to Assistant settings that we first enabled earlier this month. Android-like in design, theres a new Assistant-enabled apps menu to list Installed apps that work with Assistant.

The full page we enabled is called Assistant Shortcuts with an accompanying description. This is presumably referencing the new Google Assistant, given that the latest version can augment and control applications directly.

You can use Assistant to navigate and get things done with your installed apps.

A Your apps section prompts you to Add quick voice shortcuts to these apps, with Google and YouTube currently listed. The feature is not yet fleshed out and tapping shows an empty Recommended Shortcuts section.

The secondary use of this new feature is being able to see what apps support the new Google Assistants ability to navigate apps by voice. The best-known example today is browsing Google Photos and sending Messages by just talking with Assistant. This new list will hopefully serve as education for an otherwise invisible feature.

Unfortunately, there are many questions about the primary capability. The closest comparison today is Routines for smart home commands and some on-device functionality like silencing your phone, but Shortcuts look to entirely be for first- and third-party apps. (Routines were originally called Shortcuts before a revamp at I/O 2017.)

That said, its unclear in what contexts a command like show me my photos of New York would need to be shortened further or used frequently enough that theres a need to truncate. For the most part, navigating an app is intuitive enough that most people do not need a voice shortcut.

It would make more sense if you could string together longer or multiple commands, but we have no insight into the interface of Google Assistants new Shortcuts yet. On the app front, the hooks for Assistant need to be deep enough that every task can be truly accomplished by voice.

Dylan Roussel contributed to this article.

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‘This Is Us’: Will Rebecca and Miguel’s Relationship Be Explored in Season 5? – Showbiz Cheat Sheet

Not going to lie, its difficult to root for Rebecca (Mandy Moore) and Miguel (Jon Huertas) when their love story hasnt been explored four seasons deep into This Is Us. Thus far, Jack (Milo Ventimiglia) has been portrayed as the perfect husband to the Pearson matriarch. Meanwhile, Miguel still feels like a footnote after 72 episodes. So will This Is Us Season 5 finally dive deeper into Rebecca and Miguels relationship? Fans are itching to see this backstory unfold onscreen.

Even after the This Is Us Season 4 finale, we dont know a whole lot about Miguel. In the past, he was close friends with Rebecca and Jack. He also had two children and divorced his wife. Then years after Jacks death, Miguel reconnected with Rebecca on Facebook.

Eventually, the pair got married. But it became clear Miguels kids did not approve of their fathers relationship with Rebecca in the present day. They blamed Rebecca for their parents split. Meanwhile, Miguels relationship with Kate (Chrissy Metz), Kevin (Justin Hartley), and Randall (Sterling K. Brown) remained lukewarm.

Now This Is Us fans still dont understand the heart of Rebecca and Miguels backstory, including their romance in the past and present day as well as how the children reacted when the pair started a relationship.

At the beginninng of This Is Us Season 4 in October 2019, Huertas opened up about Miguel and hinted viewers may see more from his character.

I often think about what the legacy of this character will be and how he may educate others, the actor told NBC News. Its been a gradual and slow transition to getting fans to embrace Miguel, but hell have his moment.

Then by the midseason premiere in January 2020, fans were still itching for Miguels backstory. And in an interview with The Huffington Post, Huertas said there werent any major discussions about expanding the characters arc at the time. However, he hoped This Is Us would eventually give Miguel a little more backstory.

I hope that the show definitely delves into Miguels backstory, maybe how he became successful, how he became the husband of Rebecca. But we havent had any huge discussions about it yet, Huertas said. We know how they got together. We havent talked about how were going to see that.

By the end of This Is Us Season 4, Rebecca decided to partake in a nine month Alzheimers clinical trial in St. Louis, Missouri. She previously stated she didnt want to go and spend her final days with her family instead. However, Randall pushed her to change her mind.

Then according to The Hollywood Reporter, creator Dan Fogelman revealed the plans for the Pearson matriarch when the NBC drama returns. And now, we have confirmation This Is Us Season 5 will showcase Miguel and Rebeccas relationship.

Its obviously a challenging chapter for Rebecca moving forward, Fogelman said of Rebeccas move to St. Louis. We have a big storyline planned for Mandy in the next upcoming season in present day as an older woman and also her past timelines. That will include a deeper look into Rebecca and Miguels relationship throughout the decades.

Miguels time to shine will finally be upon us when This Is Us returns for its fifth season. Now lets just hope the new episodes will answer all our burning questions about Rebecca and Miguels love story and maybe even tell us where the couple ends up in the future.

Read more: Wait, Did We Already See the This Is Us Season 5 Premiere?

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'This Is Us': Will Rebecca and Miguel's Relationship Be Explored in Season 5? - Showbiz Cheat Sheet

Good to Go: Brick and Bones in Deep Ellum – Dallas Observer

What we love about restaurants is evolving these days, and one new important aspect is how well the food travels.

For that well-accomplished task alone, you should add Brick and Bones in Deep Ellum to your list of places to get takeout.

First note: It has the city's amended emergency regulations posted, and not just one page, but the whole thing. (Businesses are supposed to do this, but not all are, it seems.) Around it, it has an abbreviated version of its menu on offer during this season of COVID-19.

The menu has chicken and four side options, which really is enough especially when those sides are so good.

Chicken strips are made with chicken breast and get a buttermilk bath and battered before deep frying. That cup on the side is a guajillo ranch.

Taylor Adams

And for that food, Brick and Bones uses good packaging, the kind you can wash and reuse. Of course, I'm not bitching about the Styrofoam other places are using, considering the circumstances, but the fact that this spot is using more sustainable materials is delightful.

You also feel intention with the food in that packaging: Each serving is well-plated in the container. The staff could've thrown it in there the food tastes good enough to make you not care but they still care about how you first experience it visually.

As part of my habits to keep things safe, after sanitizing the exterior of containers, I also put the food in dishes from home rather than eat out of them. My apologies for missing the beauty that the green beans were before I slopped them into a bowl.

Brick and Bones is a favorite for many people who live in or frequent Deep Ellum, and there's good reason. The chicken won't blow your mind, but it will hit the spot.

A six-piece serving of Brick and Bones chicken

Taylor Adams

As of now, only the fried chicken is available (theres usually naked, hot, sexy, etc., versions), in three pieces ($9), six pieces ($17) and 10 pieces ($26). The meat's brined for 24 hours, battered and deep fried. They're served with radish, cilantro and lime.

I get excited anytime I see radish; the lime adds acidity to the batter, making this a unique flavor you don't normally get with fried chicken, and we're all for that.

As for the sides, what's currently on the menu are poblano-mashed potatoes ($6), habanero-bacon mac ($7), Mexican corn ($5) and green beans ($6).

This mac and cheese was beautiful when I opened the container. It tasted even better than it looks, too.

Taylor Adams

I'm trying to watch carbs, because Im eating more restaurant food than usual, but I couldn't stop eating the macaroni and cheese. I even had to do that thing where I move the dish across the table so I wouldn't keep taking bites of this super creamy mac. It goes easy on the habanero if you don't do spice, skip these if you're OK with a bit, a nice hit of spice follows on the back end of these.

We appreciate you, too, Brick and Bones.

Taylor Adams

The beans are well-prepared, something that seems to be hard to accomplish at some places. The Mexican corn is just fine; the consumption of carbs is better spent on that mac, though.

I'll keep varying the takeout orders, but it's going to be hard to not return to this one soon.

Brick and Bones, 2713 Elm St. (Deep Ellum). Call 469-914-6776 to order. Currently open 11 a.m. to 9 p.m.

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Good to Go: Brick and Bones in Deep Ellum - Dallas Observer

Artificial Intelligence: IDTechEx Research on State-Of-The-Art and Commercialisation Status in Diagnostics and Triage – PRNewswire

BOSTON, March 31, 2020 /PRNewswire/ -- Artificial intelligence (AI) is revolutionizing medical diagnostics. The state-of-the-art results have already demonstrated that software can achieve fast and accurate image-based diagnostics on various conditions affecting the skin, eye, ear, lung, breast, and so on. These technological advancements can help automate the diagnosis and triage processes, accelerating the process to speed up the referral process especially in urgent cases, freeing up expert resources, offering the best accuracy everywhere regardless of skill levels, and making the processes more widely available. This is a ground-breaking development with far-reaching consequences. Naturally, many innovators are scrambling to capitalize on these advancements.

The report "Digital Health & Artificial Intelligence 2020: Trends, Opportunities, and Outlook" from emerging technology research firm IDTechEx, has examined this trend. This report considers the trend towards digital and AI applications in health. It outlines the state-of-the-art in AI-based diagnosis of various conditions affecting the skin, eye, heart, breast, brain, lung, blood, genetic disorders and so on. The data sources employed are diverse including dermoscopic images, fundus images, OCT, CT, CTA, echocardiograms, electrocardiogram, mammography, pathology slides, low-res mobile phone pictures and more. This report then identifies and highlights companies seeking to capitalize on these technology advances to automate the diagnostic and triage process.

Furthermore, this report considers the trend of digital health more generally. It provides a detailed overview of the ecosystem and offersinsights into the key trends, opportunities and outlooks for all aspects of digital health, including:Telehealth and telemedicine, Remote patient monitoring, Digital therapeutics / digiceuticals / software as a medical device, Diabetes management, Consumer genetic testing, Smart home as a carer and AI in diagnostics.

Ground-breaking technology

Significant funding is flowing to start-ups and R&D teams of large corporations who develop AI tools to accelerate and/or improve the detection and classification of various diseases based on numerous data sources ranging from RGB images to CT scans, ECG signals, mammograms and to pathological slides. The state-of-the-art results demonstrate that software can do these tasks faster, cheaper, and often more accurately than trained experts and professionals.

This is an important development which, if successful, can have far-reaching consequences: it can make diagnostics much more widely available and it can free up medical experts' time to focus on more complex tasks which currently sit beyond the capabilities of AI-based automation. The technology is today making leaps forward, but technology is only a piece of the puzzle, and many other challenges will need to be overcome before such software tools are widely adopted. However, the direction of travel is clear.

This trend is today on the rise because (a) the availability of digitized medical data sources is rapidly increasing, offering excellent algorithm training feedstock, and (b) advancements in AI algorithms specially trained deep neural networking are enabling software to tackle tasks which it hitherto could not do.

The IDTechEx report "Digital Health & Artificial Intelligence 2020: Trends, Opportunities, and Outlook" outlines many such advancements and identifies some of the key companies pursuing each opportunity. The remainder of this article briefly outlines two specific cases: eye disease and skin disease.

Eye Disease

Diabetic retinopathy is a complication that affects the eye. Researchers from India have recently shown that the software accurately interprets retinal fundus photographs to enable a large-scale screening program to detect diabetic retinopathy. The software is trained to make multiple binary classifications, allocating a risk level to each patient. The algorithm was trained and tuned on a total of more than 140k images. The machine matched and exceeded the sensitivity and selectivity level achieved by trained manual experts. The software achieved 92.1% and 95.2% sensitivity and selectivity, respectively.

Naturally, there is a strong business case here, and many are seeking to capitalize on it. One example is IDx, based out of Iowa in the US, who has designed and developed an algorithm to detect diabetic retinopathy. Their AI system achieves a sensitivity and specificity of 87% and 90%, respectively. In as early as 2017, it was tested at 10 sites across the US on 900 patients.

A very insightful test in eye clinics is the OCT (optical coherence tomography), which creates high-resolution (5um) 3D maps of the back of the eye and require expert analysis to interpret. OCT is now one of the most common imaging procedures with 5.35 million OCT scans performed in the US Medicare population in 2014 alone. This creates a backlog in processing and triage, and such delays can be harmful when they cause avoidable treatment delay for urgent cases.

DeepMind (Google) has demonstrated an algorithm that can automate the triage process based on 3D OCT image. Their algorithm design has some unique features. It consists of two stages: (1) a segmentation network and (2) a classification network. The first network will output a labelled tissue segmentation map. Based on the segmented maps, the second network will output a diagnosis probability for over 50 eye-threatening eye conditions and provide referral suggestion. The first part was trained on 877 sparely and manually segmented images and the second network on 14,884 training tissue maps with confirmed diagnosis and referral decision.This database is one of the best curated medical eye databases worldwide.

This two-stage design is beneficial in that when the OCT machine or image definition changes, only the first part will need to be retrained. This will help this algorithm become more universally applicable. In an end-to-end training network, the entire network would need to be retrained.

DeepMind demonstrated that performance of their AI in making a referral recommendation, reaches or exceeds that of experts on a range of sight-threatening retinal diseases. The error rate on referral decision is 5.5%, exceeding or matching specialists even when specialists are given fundus images as well as patient notes in addition to the OCT. Furthermore, the AI beat all retina specialists and optometrists on selectivity and sensitivity measures in referring urgent cases. This is clearly the first step, but an important one that truly opens the door.

Skin disease

Researchers at Heidelberg have already demonstrated that trained deep neural networks, in this case based on Google's Inception v4 CNN architecture, can recognize melanoma based on dermoscopy images. These researchers showed that the software achieves 10 percent more specificity than human clinicians when the sensitivity was set at a level matching human clinicians. The machine can achieve a high 95% sensitivity at a 63.8% specificity.

This is a promising result that shows such diagnostics can be automated. Indeed, multiple companies are automating detection of cancer diseases. One example is SkinVision, from the Netherlands, which seeks to offer a risk rating of skin cancer based on relatively low-quality smartphone images. They trained their algorithm on more than 131k images from 31k users in multiple countries. The risk ranking of the training images were annotated by dermatologists. Studies show that the algorithm can score a 95.1% sensitivity in detecting (pre)malignant conditions with 78.3% specificity. These are good results although the specificity may need to improve as it could unnecessarily alarm some patients.

The business cases are not just limited to cancer detection. Haut.AI is an Estonian company that proposes to use images to track skin dynamics and offer recommendations. One example is that their AI can be a simple and accurate predictor of chronological age using just the anonymized images of eye corners. The networks were trained on 8414 anonymized highresolution images of eye corners labelled with the correct chronological age. For people within the age range of 20 to 80 in a specific population, the machine reaches a mean absolute error of 2.3 years.

There are naturally many more start-ups active in this field. Some firms are focused on health diagnostic whilst others are seeking to use the AI to create tailored skincare regimes and product recommendation. The path to market, and the regulatory barriers, for each target function will naturally be different.

To learn more about this exciting field, please see IDTechEx's report "Digital Health & Artificial Intelligence 2020: Trends, Opportunities, and Outlook" by visitingwww.IDTechEx.com/digitalhealth. This report outlines the state-of-the-art in the use of AI in diagnosing a range of medical conditions. It also identifies and discusses the progress of various companies seeking to commercialize such technological advances. Furthermore, this report considers the trend of digital health more generally. It provides a detailed overview of the ecosystem and offers insights into the key trends, opportunities and outlooks for all aspects of digital health, including: Telehealth and telemedicine, Remote patient monitoring, Digital therapeutics / digiceuticals / software as a medical device, Diabetes management, Consumer genetic testing, Smart home as a carer and AI in diagnostics.

To connect with others on this topic, register for The IDTechEx Show! USA 2020, November 18-19 2020, Santa Clara, USA. Presenting the latest emerging technologies at one event, with six concurrent conferences and a single exhibition covering 3D Printing and 3D Electronics, Electric Vehicles, Energy Storage, Graphene & 2D Materials, Healthcare, Internet of Things, Printed Electronics, Sensors and Wearable Technology. Please visit http://www.IDTechEx.com/USAto find out more.

IDTechEx guides your strategic business decisions through its Research, Consultancy and Event products, helping you profit from emerging technologies. For more information on IDTechEx Research and Consultancy contact [emailprotected] or visit http://www.IDTechEx.com.

Media Contact:

Jessica AbineriMarketing Coordinator[emailprotected] +44-(0)-1223-812300

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Psychodermatalogy treatments: the importance of the mind-skin link – Professional Beauty

How psychodermatalogy works and the importance of the mind-skin linkIn his book, Skin Deep, psychologist Dr Ted Grossbart writes: Shut anger or sadness or frustration out the door and it comes through in the window, or often enough, through the body. Your heart attacks. Your asthma gasps. Your eczema weeps.

If were unable to process stress or emotion, it can show up in the form of acne, eczema, psoriasis, rosacea or even disorders such as dermatillomania, which manifests as repetitive and compulsive skin picking. This can affect our emotions and self-esteem. In fact, a study published in the British Journal of Dermatology found that those who suffered with acne were 63% more likelyto develop depression in the first year of being diagnosed.

The link between mind and skin has been known forcenturies, dating back as far as Hippocrates, says DrAlia Ahmed, a consultant dermatologist who runs apsychodermatology service at Eudelo Skin Clinic inVauxhall, London, and practises in the NHS.

Psychodermatology considers both the mind andthe skin together when seeing aperson with a skin problem. Andthese patients who Dr Ahmed seesare often facing a breadth of skinproblems and body dysmorphiadisorder, coupled with emotionaldistress.

Neuroscientist Dr Claudia Aguirre,who specialises in the mind-skin link,explains that our negative thoughts can affect the skin far more than we may realise. A term in psychologycalled rumination, which is whensomeone has a recurring stream ofnegative thoughts, can wreak havocon the skin.

This can hinder our healing, since it can leadto depressive thoughts or feelings of defeat about arecurring condition, she says. So, we can get stuck in anegative thought pattern, which is a form of stress andanxiety, and can maintain the body in an inflammatorystate this can even trigger or worsen inflammatory skinconditions like eczema and acne.

As a result, this stress can make the issue worse, and sothe viscous cycle begins. Feelings of emotional distresslead to the release of stress hormone cortisol, which isknown to affect the immune system (making theskin less able to defend itself), drive allergicresponses, delay healing and disrupt the skinsnatural barrier, she says. I believe addressing theinteraction between the brain,skin and mind is key toachieving healthy skin.

With the risingacknowledgement ofpsychodermatology andpopularity of mindfulness, theemphasis on the mind-skinlink is now trickling in to salonand spa treatments. Onepractitioner who is paving theway is Beata Aleksandrowicz,founder of the AleksandrowiczSystem. Her treatment Face Cure addresses theconnection to their clients appearance and theemotions that can be held in the face.

If there isa preponderance of negative emotions, themuscles will remain contracted, which will restrictthe flow of oxygen and nutrients to each cell andwill be manifested by a lack of radiance andtone, says Aleksandrowicz.

Combined with mindfulness and massage,her treatment focuses on the client reconnectingwith their facial appearance. I see so manyclients who are unhappy with their face.Many have had aesthetic treatments, so they dontalways know what they should look like anymore; in somecases they become disconnected with their face, shesays. It is as much about inner work on the conscious andsubconscious as outer work on the facial muscles and skin.

The skin can be a barometer for whats going onunderneath, and tapping in to this mind-skin link isbecoming increasingly important to deliver a tailoredtreatment. More clients are coming inwith stressed skin, whether that isredness, rosacea, eczema, psoriasis,or general extremes on the skin, saysKatie Light, a holistic wellness coachand facialist, who treats clients at hertreatment rooms in Brighton andKnightsbridge, London.

Light often sees these skin issues goinghand-in-hand with mental healthproblems. If people are having anxiety,panic attacks or depression, which I see a lot more of now, itaffects the skin, and everyone is supressing it because theythink its the norm; no one is dealing with it, she explains.

Itsnot just about applying things topically, its about looking ateverybodys lifestyle and where the anxiousness is comingfrom to treat the stress as well as the skin.

In her treatments, Light uses a range of techniques. I doaffirmations and visualisations that are personal to thatclient, so I would ask: How do you want to look? What isyour ideal? and we make that in to a storyboard or avisual board of something to aim for, she says.

Neurolinguistic programming (NLP) is another techniqueshe uses to treat her clients holistically, and betweensessions she will also set up homework for them so theyhave a toolbox of techniques to hand to keep both the skinand mind healthy.

Light says the initial consultation is vital to fullyunderstand her clients needs. Its an essentialpart of what I do to treat the physical, mental andemotional; whether its anxiety or eczema, they allneed to be treated from a whole wellbeingperspective, she says.

Similarly, holistic practitionerAlexandra Soveral alsoaddresses the mind-skin link inher facials and massages ather London clinic. Im a greatbeliever in self-healing formany skin conditions, and thiscomes from how we feel aboutourselves, says Soveral. Somany people come to medistressed about theirpersistent acne, irritated eczema or reoccurringrosacea, but seldom have they considered itscause to be laced within the interconnections ofthe various body systems.

Soveral says clients suffering with persistent acneand stress are a common example of this. They findsqueezing their spots a stress-release mechanismthats hard to give up, even when I explain thatuntil they stop the acne is unlikely to go away asthey are spreading the acne-causing bacteriaevery time they do it, she says. After squeezinga spot, the skin is inflamed and red and peopleoften feel guilty, which then adds more stress.

When treating a client, it can often be difficult toget them to open up, says Soveral. Many dontadmit to having emotional issues regardingtheir skin or appearance, and those that want to address it dont have the resources, support or the knowledge of how to approach such a problem, she says.

Therefore, creating an offering on your treatment menu to open up this dialogue is important, as is having the training to spot what the client may have going on. Holistic practitioners like me, and psychodermatologists, know the difference and can offer much-needed help and reassurance, she says.

Part of this is asking the right questions, says Light. There could be severe redness in the clients face and that may be due to cortisol levels, lack of sleep or what theyre putting on their skin topically, but until you start asking those questions and understanding what it is thats going on for that person, you cant get to theroot of that.

Encouraging clients to adopt self-care strategies is another way to improve the mind-skinlink between treatments. This can also be done by practising self-healing on a daily basis and essentially making sure to take good care of ourselves, saysSoveral. Taking action triggers positivity and has a domino effect on our emotions that eventually will benefit the skin.

A new app paving the way for this is Beautification, which offers guided meditations designed to be used in conjunction with a daily skincare routine. With the rising awareness of skin-mind connection, its been proven that only three to four minutes of meditation a day can help ease the tension and bring out physical beauty benefits, says chief executive and co-founder Heyyoung Kim.

Having a relaxing massage with a choice of three oils is not necessarily holistic, says Soveral. The treatment needs to be prescriptive to the client. Its important for salons and spas to understand that working with your client needs to go beyond the technical approach to the face and skin, agrees Aleksandrowicz.

Understand where the clients concern comes from and address them equally on a physical and emotional level. Advice should go beyond practical skincare suggestions to address the lifestyle, the emotional condition of the client and their ability to accept who they are.

Many brands offer training to help tap into the mind-skin link. A partof SBC skincare training is its 5 Phase Concept, which involves an in-depth conversation that includes reading the clients body language and employing methods to understand their emotional needs and establish trust.

Meanwhile, Sienna X skincare training includes Emotional Freedom Technique (EFT), a holistic healing method designed to treat both physical and emotional distress by tapping the face at specific pressure points. Energy alignment practices, such as Reiki, are another way to create a holistic offering for your clients.

For a spa to incorporate psychodermatology, it needsto invest in further training of its therapists, change its booking system to accommodate more time for each client, and extend the consultation period, says Soveral. Carving out time for these initial conversations is essential to truly understand the needs of the client.

I generally have a consultation with somebody on the phone first to find out a little bit more detail and then I will book them in according to what I think they might need, says Light. Theres a lot of detail that needs to come out at that point before I even get to the face.

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Many moods of mind-yoga – Bangalore Mirror

By Alistair Shearer

The three different types of widely practised meditation, each known for its own characteristic physical and mental parameters

Despite its ubiquity, the word meditation is notoriously imprecise. Meaning different things to different people, the term is used to cover almost anything in addition to a formal sitting practice: walking the dog, pottering in the garden or enjoying a quiet days fishing can all qualify. Benign and restorative such activities may well be, but that is just the point, they are still activities, whereas real meditation, deep mind-yoga is the gradual lessening of all activity and a commensurate entry into silence.

From around the end of the first millennium, Hindu Tantric and Mahayana Buddhist schools (especially the Tibetan Vajrayana), advocate the use of mantras and visualisation. A more emotive approach emerges in medieval times, with the culture of surrender to divine love through the means of theistic worship (puja), devotional chanting and singing (bhajan, kirtan) or dedicated service (seva) to a deity, such as Krishna, Rama or the Divine Mother in one of her many forms. Within all these systems there are further distinguishing factors, such as the different uses of sound, whether the eyes are open or closed (and the way this changes the meditative experience), and the distinction between a method employing awareness of the breath, or other physiological functions, as opposed to a purely mental focus that is detached from bodily grounding.

Nevertheless, whatever the practice, meditators themselves have always known that it has definite subjective effects, which is presumably why they bother to continue. Scientists, on the other hand, the high priests of our secular age, are slower in the uptake, generally beginning to take interest in a phenomenon only when it becomes noticeable as an economic and cultural factor in society. This tipping point has now been reached with yoga and meditation, whose success over many decades indicates that they are no mere passing fad, but reflect deeper needs, ways of thinking and changes in society at large. Realising that an examination of yoga can tell them something about how people live under the taxing conditions of modernity, researchers have been exploring the territory over the past forty years or more, and continue to do so with enthusiasm.

Featuring prominently among the data accumulated so far are the physical changes accompanying meditation, or what we can call the bodily imprint of mind-yoga. The general state of the meditating body can be measured by its breathing rate and volume, and its level of rest as shown by these, the metabolic rate and galvanic skin response, as well as various chemical and hormonal changes in the system. More excitingly, concomitant changes in brain-activity are monitored by examining the electroencephalogram (EEG) readings of the brainwaves, which show the electrical activity of millions of neurons as they rise and fall at different frequencies, depending on our state of consciousness and what we are doing. Two American researchers, Fred J Travis and Jonathan Shear, have recently proposed a useful model which identifies three basic types of meditation, each with its own characteristic physical and mental parameters.

Focused Attention

This first type of meditation involves focusing the attention on some object or perception, by concentrating on a single point and disallowing the mind from wandering off it. The object of such a focus could be virtually anything: a candle flame, a geometric yantra diagram, or a regular bodily rhythm is all methods typically employed in such a system. The aim is to train the attention to hold steady in one place and thereby to frustrate its natural habit of jumping from one thing to another. The shorthand term monkey-mind is used in many teachings, likening our chronic mental restlessness to the movements of a monkey that leaps from branch to branch, chattering incessantly. Such instability, so the argument goes, can only be overcome by forcibly centering the attention so that it remains undistracted on the present point of focus. EEG imaging techniques have identified the various areas of the brain associated with mental meandering, as well as those associated with registering distraction, re-orienting awareness and holding a sustained focus.

These show that in this Focused Attention meditation, the EEG movement is rapid, rising and falling twenty to thirty times a second to produce what is called beta wave EEG. It can be even faster, in the range of thirty to fifty times per second which is known as gamma wave EEG. Studies cited in Scientific American suggested that, as one might predict, practising this type of meditation improves the minds ability to focus. However, high frequency EEG is not a restful, calm or expanded state but a relatively active, even tensed, one, consistent with concentrating in a focused, and exclusive, manner.

Open Monitoring

Another general category of meditation is Open Monitoring. This employs a volitional control of the mind, in order to change how it reacts to stressful information. The practitioner of this type of technique observes their thoughts, experiences and emotional reactions as they appear and disappear, and tries to maintain a non-judgmental attitude towards them. Continuously cultivating a neutral response to whatever sensations arise and pass away in the mind, and remaining free of reactivity to them, develops the strategic habit of separating the experiencer, the I, from his mental impressions. This separation works to correct, redirect or even inhibit his spontaneous reactions. With sufficient practice, this habit persists outside of meditation as well. So, for example, if patients suffering from depression school themselves to monitor the memories, and observe the feelings, they find problematic, they will become better able to manage sadness, anxiety and so on, in everyday life. When and if such feelings do arise, they will carry less force and be less dominant.

Neuro-imaging studies confirm that Open Monitoring reduces activity in those areas of the brain involved in anxiety and the technique has been shown to help people deal with symptoms of depression and anxiety. One dramatic example is that of war veterans suffering post-traumatic stress disorder. Open Monitoring also decreases disturbed sleep patterns. This type of meditation is characterised by a slower EEG wave pattern, called theta, which oscillates only five to eight times a second. Theta EEG occurs naturally when someone is preoccupied for example, while reading a book and is no longer aware of outside stimuli, such as surrounding noise or other sensory input from the environment. This lack of attention to ambient information is due to changes in the functioning of the thalamus, that part of the brain responsible for processing incoming sensory data. While Open Monitoring can be seen to correspond to what Patanjali calls pratyahara the withdrawal of the sensory focus in an inward direction as the attention settles down it still requires continuous focus and thus some degree of mental effort is involved. This effort is less than that required in the Focused Attention method, and may not be experienced as onerous, but it still works to engage the awareness in a focus which is limiting and exclusive. Because of this, the mind is still con- fined to a relatively surface level of thinking and perceiving.

Self-transcending

The third type of meditation corresponds to the process that Patanjali advocates in his classic text, which is to say, a progressive interiority that culminates in the settled state of the mind known as samadhi (coming together or coherence). What is crucial about this process, and what distinguishes it from its two predecessors, is the fact that it is non-volitional and proceeds automatically. In other words, the awareness easily and effortlessly settles inwards of its own accord.

The subjective experience is one of thought becoming increasingly quieter and less defined; rather as if the volume of the radio were gradually being turned down until it becomes silent. This progressive renunciation of experience is felt as a growing peacefulness and quiet enjoyment. The surrender of experience culminates in a state free of sensory perceptions, thoughts or emotions, whatever their content or character. Mind-yoga teachings call this pure consciousness the word pure meaning free of all admixture describing it as a state of undisturbed being, free of all mental input. With the cessation of its activity, the limited sense of self as volitional agent is gradually transcended. During self-transcending, a middle frequency EEG wave pattern typically occurs, at seven to nine cycles per second.

This is called alpha-1 and is characteristic of reduced mental activity and increased relaxation. We can imagine these coherent alpha waves as functioning something like the conductor of an orchestra, working to bring all the different instruments into a harmonious whole. This orderly activity in frontal alpha waves was first discovered in practitioners self-transcending meditation over forty years ago. More recently, a meta-analysis published in the American Psychological Associations Psychological Bulletin in 2006 cited seven studies showing that in self-transcending meditation alpha EEG coherence increases between the left and right sides of the frontal brain and continues spreading until the whole brain becomes synchronised and coherent. Such synchrony appears to enliven a coherent state of consciousness that has beneficial effects for both mind and body. When the mind settles, the level of biochemical and physiological stress decreases significantly. This reverses our ancient biological inheritance, the fight-or-flight response, that is marked by an increase in heartbeat, respiration rate and the production of powerful stress hormones, such as adrenalin and cortisol, as well as stress-related compounds such as lactic acid.

This stress-reflex is still hard-wired in the human animal because our early ancestors were stationed squarely in the middle of the food chain, eating smaller creatures but in constant danger of being eaten themselves. Our high-alert setting continued until relatively recently in evolutionary terms, and such ancient and intrinsic biological mechanisms cannot just be wished away by conscious intention. However, when mental activity settles down naturally, without any coercion and of its own free will, the direct opposite to the fight-or-flight response seems to occur in the body. Self-transcending techniques bring about a stay-and-play physiological response, marked by a reduction in stress chemicals and a generally benign blood chemistry.

It seems the repeated restfulness of this state allows for not only the spontaneous dissolution of accumulated physical fatigue and tension but, over time, the neutralising of those deep-rooted psychological and emotional impressions that Hans Selye identified as the persisting effects of distress. One clue as to how this self-healing or to use a yogic phrase purification happens may lie in its analogy with dream- less sleep.

Self-transcending techniques mimic sleep, but practitioners do not lose consciousness and they also register different types of physiological changes from those brought on by sleeping. Studies published between 2012 and 2015 show that in sleep, the brain switches on an internal detox-system that uses the cerebrospinal fluid moving between the brain and spinal cord to wash out cellular waste from the central nervous system. This so-called glymphatic system uses the cells batteries the mitochondria to flush out up to three pounds of waste proteins a year, in much the same way as the lymph system in other organs removes waste to the kidney and liver. If this cleansing and revitalising process is, in fact, activated by the restful nature of dreamless sleep, it may well be replicated and augmented by the deep rest of regular meditation.

Subjectively, the relief of being free from the burden of any sort of thinking, whether directed or not, is immense. From a yogic point of view, this process is a gentle withdrawal of awareness from the habitual outward pull of the senses (pratyahara), followed by the gradual settling of the waves of thought and feeling (chitta-vrittis) as their content is purified and released. Eventually there comes a falling back into what Patanjali calls our true nature (sva-rupa). In this way, self-transcending meditation allows the practitioner eventually to become consciously familiar with the core of their being, an area that lies beyond all mental activity, which yoga teachings identify as purusha, the Person, that is to say, our irreducible essence.

An extract from The Story of Yoga, with permission from Penguin Viking

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Life may change for us all: How we respond to the coronavirus crisis will be defining, historians say – USA TODAY

When historiansmarkthe start of this nation's coronavirus nightmare, theywill cite Jan. 21, 2020, the date a Washington state man in his 30s who had visited Wuhan, China, was confirmed as the United States'first COVID-19 case.

Since then, this global crisis has mushroomed into a national defining moment with as yet untallied cultural and economic repercussions. No one questions whether we will be talking about this for generations.If there is debate, it is over the proper historical comparison.

Is this likethe 2008 financial crisis, 9/11, World War II? Or perhaps, as someeconomists predict and news that 3.3 million people applied for unemployment last week suggests,will this be remembered as a periodof deep loss and poverty, something likethe grim 1930swhen unemployment hit 25%?

This will be very economically disruptive,and an analogy to the Great Depression is the closest to what we may face, says Stanford University economics professor Matthew Jackson. These huge events can have profound changes on the views and beliefs people have.

That we are in for difficult months and perhaps years ahead seems commonly accepted, as virus deaths mount, hospitals are overwhelmedand a decimated service-based economy spursa $2.2 trillion wartime-scale bailout package in Washington, D.C.

But if there is cause for optimism in these bleak times, historians, economists and writers say, it is born out of the fact that we as a nation can choose to seize this moment to create an even greater society better poised to protect its citizens from future crises.

In this Nov. 24, 1933 file photo, unemployed men wait outside the State Labor Bureau in New York. The epic hardship of the 1930s is the best-known depression in American history, and some economists are concerned the repercussions of the COVID-19 crisis could send the U.S. reeling back to those difficult times.(Photo: AP)

There are precedents for bold responses to watershed American events.

The Depression gave rise to the Social Security Act, which promised citizens financial safety in their later years. World War II drew women into the workforce and minorities into the military, leading to the equal and civil rights movements. And the 2008 financial meltdown gave rise to banking regulations and renewed scrutiny of illicit financial tools.

The possible positive national reactions to the COVID-19 pamdemic which as of this writinghas infected more than 120,000 Americans and killed more than 2,000, out of a global tally of 680,000 sickened and more than 30,000 dead are myriad.

They could include a renewed appreciation of governments role in grappling with unprecedented crises, a remaking of manufacturing pipelines so they rely less on foreign suppliers,and a rekindled appreciation for friends and neighbors, experts say.

As tough as things look now, I do see us possibly demonstrating a sense that were all in this together, says Joseph Margulies,a law professor at Cornell University in New York and author of What Changed When Everything Changed: 9/11 and the Making of National Identity.

Margulies notes that in contrast to WWII, when Japanese-Americans were rounded up and interned, and the Red Scare, when those suspected ofCommunist leanings wereblacklisted, this debacle has governors from New York to California saying the same thing,'stay home,' and they mean everyone, not one group.

At the moment, most cultural observers note that the sharp political divide that existed before the virus arrived still persists.

Thats evident in everything from the squabbles that erupted as Congress debated the size and scope of the bailout, to the tension between President Donald Trumps desire to see the nation reopen for business next month and a range of health officials countering that the worst is yet to come if life is allowed to resume prematurely.

A mask-wearing man in the Philippines walks by an iconic poster from WWII America that depicts Rosie the Riveter, a fictional factory worker meant to inspired Americans of both sexes to pitch in to the war effort during the 1940s. Our coronavirus crisis could inspire the same kind of unified national effort at recovering from the epidemic, historians say.(Photo: Aaron Favila, AP)

But some semblance of a unified national direction will be crucial to rebounding from this historic moment, given the as yet unknown shifts inthe way we shop, work, travel and learn, says Matthew Continetti, resident fellow at the American Enterprise Institute, a conservative think tank.

Clearly, the cost of the virus in lives and resources will pale in comparison to the way life may change for us all, he says.Just like terrorism before it, this pandemic may present real challenges to civil liberties that well have to grapple with.

Continetti points out that at the core of the American ethos is freedom, which also can translate into a rejection of government-issued rules meant to ensure public safety. That could create problems if, say, the government were to echo moves by some Asian nations and track virus carriers via their cellphones and closed-circuit TV cameras.

I dont think most Americans are ready to embrace that, he says.

The coronavirus has robbed us all: Let yourself mourn the loss, experts say.

As this emergency eventually turns into a state of persistent vigilance, what could be on the horizon for us is in fact is a difficult push and pull. On the one side, a desire to return to our pre-virus lives at all costs; on the other, an acknowledgement thatnothing will evertruly be the same.

Continetti says that what is coming next will represent a true paradigm shift, one in which a society long driven by the pursuit of happiness at all costs may have to rearrange its social and moral priorities.

Its a noble and frightening future were facing, he says. But it may also give us a newfound sense of national solidarity.

Volunteer Art Ponce is handed a box of sterile swabs and gloves from a donor at a Sacramento County collection site in Sacramento, California this week. The state was among the first to declare local and state-wide self-quarantining for residents in an effort to stem the tide of COVID-19 cases.(Photo: Rich Pedroncelli, AP)

A few things should happen rather quickly as a result of this seminal moment in our history, one that undeniably has parallels to the Spanish flu pandemic of 1918, says Rice University historian Douglas Brinkley.

Among them are a renewed appreciation for science, a rekindled admiration for doctors, and a funding bonanza for government health institutions such as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, a once mighty and now underfunded institution that by most accounts has been caught flat-footed by this pandemic.

In U.S. history, whatever rises to a level of national concern gets funding, and health should rise sky-high, says Brinkley, noting that, in contrast, the impact of 9/11 was felt mostly in the Northeast and Hurricane Katrina in the Deep South. Coronavirus is touching everyone, so what officials wont want to be prepared for the next outbreak?

Brinkley, who is working on a book about the environmental movement of the 1960s and 70s, is hopeful that another reaction to this historical turning point will be a more urgent focus on curbing climate change.

Many scientists believe that new viruses are bound to spread as global temperature rises lead to the migration of animals. There are suspicions that the new coronavirusmay have jumped species from pangolins, an exotic scale-covered mammal that is illegally hunted in parts of Asia.

You cant wipe out rainforests in Brazil and not expect to have a health care payback, Brinkley says.

When will coronavirus end?What wartime and human kindness can tell us about what happens next

Another sober realization bound to hit Americans across the economic spectrum is how globally interconnected the economies of all nations have become.

That phone youre holding or the car youre driving may be designed or built in the U.S., but countless such products invariably have many parts made in countries whose manufacturing plants are now at risk as employees get sick as governments order shutdowns.

The virus will end, well have a vaccine in 12 to 18 months, but what will the world economy look like after 12 to 18 months of stagnation, let alone if the virus comes back? says Jerald Combs, professor emeritus of history at San Francisco State University and author of The History of American Foreign Policy from 1895.

Combs says that as the virus cripples supplier countries such as India and China, U.S. manufacturing ultimately will have to find new ways to make products or face economic hardships. Such adjustments could be required of American companies for years, given it remains unknown whether today's viral threat is an aberration ora preview of whats to come.

World War II had a huge impact on American society in so many ways, but they had one advantage over what were dealing with, Combs says. They knew at some point the war would end. We, on the other hand, are still not sure.

A tourist passes the statue of former British Prime Minister Winston Churchill in Parliament Square in London, where Prime Minister Boris Johnson recently announced he has tested positive for COVID-19.(Photo: Matt Dunham, AP)

To get a sense of just how much this Defining Moment has us concerned, consider that author Erik Larson has received what he calls a surprising amount of messages from readers who have found a sense of solace in the pages of his new book, The Splendid and the Vile, which chronicles how Winston Churchill led British resistance to the relentless Nazi onslaught of 1940.

People must simply be getting lost in a time when you had this catastrophic threat to a nation and a charismatic leader pulling them through it, Larson says. Theres this heroic clarity to that time, Churchill defying Hitler and rallying the public, saying 'Were all in this together.' I guess maybe people would like that now.

After years of research that brought him close to heart and mind of the legendary British prime minister, Larson is convinced Churchills message today for any nation facing the defining challenge that is the coronavirus threat would be inspirationally simple.

Says Larson: Hed have been quick to say that this is not the apocalypse, all our institutions will survive, our world will endure, and we will go forth when this is over.

Follow USA TODAY national correspondent Marco della Cava: @marcodellacava

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Life may change for us all: How we respond to the coronavirus crisis will be defining, historians say - USA TODAY

America’s Revolutionary Mind: A Moral History of the American Revolution and the Declaration That Defined It by C. Bradley Thompson – The Objective…

New York: Encounter Books, 2019584 pp. $32.99 (hardcover)

The history of the world cannot furnish an instance of fortitude and heroic magnanimity parallel to that displayed by the members, whose signatures affixed the Declaration of American Independence. James Thacher, soldier in the Continental Army (335)

Each year, more than a million people travel from all over the globe to the National Archives Museum in Washington, D.C., home of the Declaration of Independence. People of all nationalitiesnot only Americansare fascinated by this faded, smudged, parchment because, however ironically, it represents a doorway to modernity. Prior to the American Revolution, most people throughout most of human history had suffered under one form of monarchy or another. The founding fathers, however, broke with that past, laying a foundation for freedom and flourishing.

Understanding the principles of the Declaration is essential to sustaining what scientist Jacob Bronowski called the ascent of man, and for preventing the world from sliding back into tyranny and oppression. For well over a century, though, those principles have been distorted and attacked by many of those entrusted to relay the story of the Revolution: namely, academic historians. Thats all the more reason, then, for lovers of liberty and human progress to cheer the publication of C. Bradley Thompsons Americas Revolutionary Mind. The first in a two-part series on the countrys fundamental ideas, this book is not a narrative of events but a systematic re-creation of the philosophy that led colonists to, in the words of Thomas Paine, begin the world over again.

Thompsons new moral history, as he calls it, follows the evidence left in the periods numerous pamphlets, speeches, sermons, letters, and resolutions to reconstruct the moral reasoning upon which Americans pledged their lives, their fortunes, and their sacred honor in defense of individual rights. He introduces modern readers to a pantheon of brilliant revolutionary thinkers: not only well-knowns such as Thomas Jefferson, John Adams, Benjamin Franklin, and Alexander Hamilton, but scores of anonymous pamphleteers and other largely forgotten luminaries, such as Dan Foster, Elihu Palmer, and Jonathan Mayhew. Weaving together their words, Thompson shows us just how great the consensus was among colonists on the fundamental tenets of the American mind.

This consistency came in large part from a common root: the Enlightenment thought of Francis Bacon, Isaac Newton, and, most significantly, John Locke. Nature, to be commanded, must be obeyed, said Bacon, and Newton went about demonstrating the incredible power of observation-based science. Newtons friend Locke, a physician-turned-philosopher, applied this scientific approach to man himself, concluding that an understanding of mans essential nature reveals certain universal moral and political truths. And Thompsons extended archaeological excavation of Americas revolutionary mind reveals that it is virtually synonymous with John Lockes mind (9, 32).

This is an all-too-rare conclusion among historians. As Thomas Pangle so well explains in The Spirit of Modern Republicanism, the post-sixties era birthed a sort of conservative reframing of the revolution and American foundingone that downplayed Lockes significance and amplified that of the prebourgeois, communitarian, classical republican thinkers of Greece and Rome. And although Pangle (and Jerome Huyler, in his Locke in America) exposed the problems with this classical republican tradition and showed the depth of Lockes influence, their works were addressed to an academic audience already steeped in the historiographical debate. In Americas Revolutionary Mind, Thompsona Clemson professor who teaches political science to undergraduates using a Great Books approachlargely abstains from that debate, focusing solely on clearly presenting the Lockean/American system.1

His presentation does draw sharp distinctions between classical republicswhich often unleashed the rights violations endemic of majoritarian democracyand the innovative liberal republics devised by Americas founders. In contrast to the ancient Greek and Roman republics, writes Thompson, the new American republics shrank the public sphere and expanded the private sphere. In other words, American-style republicanism was unique because of the emphasis it put on limiting the political power of those who ruleincluding the rule of the majorityso that individuals could rule themselves more efficaciously (278).

Another historically inaccurate narrative that Thompson deflates is the one popularized most recently by the New York Times 1619 Project that Americans declared independence for the purpose of protecting slavery. The intellectual case for slavery did not arise in America until the late 1830s, when the institution came under direct attack from northern abolitionists, he writes (143). Most Americans were aware that slavery contradicted their most fundamental principles. [I]t would be useless for us to denounce the servitude to which the Parliament of Great Britain wishes to reduce us, said Benjamin Rush, while we continue to keep our fellow creatures in slavery just because their color is different from ours (137). In the judgment of many slaveholders, however, they were stuck on the horns of a dilemma: We have the wolf by the ears, and we can neither hold him, nor safely let him go, wrote Jefferson. Justice is in one scale, and self-preservation in the other (134).

Although the founders did not achieve their ideals in full, as Lincoln would later say, they nonetheless set up a standard maxim for free society and declared the right, so that the enforcement of it might follow as fast as circumstances should permit (360). Thompson writes, Without question, the most important step in abolishing slavery was taken on July 4, 1776, when the American people declared to the world as a self-evident truth, all men are created equal (145). The logic of [the Revolutions] core moral principles highlighted a blot on the character of the country and galvanized an unprecedentedly energetic abolitionist movement (151). Overall, by 1810, more than 100,000 slaves had been emancipated in the United States, either through court decisions, legislation, or acts of individual manumission. It was the largest emancipation of slaves in world history (147).

In a startling epilogue, Has America Lost Its American Mind?, Thompson reveals that much of the widespread antipathy toward the founding vision actually stems from the proslavery movement that began in the 1830s. Committed slavers understood that their practices could not be reconciled with the universal moral principles of the Declaration.

They needed a theory that justified the notion that whats true for you is not true for me, and they found it in the historical relativism (historicism) of the philosopher Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel, which advanced the idea that truth (especially moral and political truth) is historically relative to ones own cultural horizon. They embraced Hegels fantasy that the world is like a single organism and that history necessarily unfolds through stages toward higher levels of civilization. Slaverys defenders arguedquoting Hegel in the House of Representativesthat theirs was not the backward and barbarous way of life, but the culmination of progress, a mode of becoming participant in a higher morality (364). Men, being mere parts of a more important whole, are subordinate to the good of the whole, wrote proslavery advocate George Fitzhugh, and free society must be replaced by domestic slavery, which he called the oldest, the best and the most common form of Socialism and the beau ideal of Communism (37273).

Thankfully, the Union defeated the Confederacy to which these ideas gave rise, but, as Thompson deftly outlines, its political goals and historicist method took deep root, and academics revived attacks not only against the Declarations self-evident truths, but against the very idea of truth itself (374).

Despite its account of the spread of this philosophic disease through much of the American mind, Thompsons achievement is proof that this mind is not entirely lostand his book is an invaluable resource for understanding its nature and principles. Pick up a copy, and keep your eyes peeled for Thompsons next bookon Americas constitutional mind.

P.S. Join C. Bradley Thompson and Timothy Sandefur for a discussion of Americas Revolutionary Ideas: Their History and Future at TOS-Con 2020: Philosophy for Freedom and Flourishing.

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America's Revolutionary Mind: A Moral History of the American Revolution and the Declaration That Defined It by C. Bradley Thompson - The Objective...