Category Archives: Quantum Computing

Paper Outlines the Role of ERM in Managing Risks Related to New Technologies – Business Wire

SANTA FE, N.M.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--The Shared Assessments Program today released a new briefing paper, The Role of ERM in Managing Risks Related to New Technologies. This collaborative, member-driven effort examines the challenges that come with significant technology shifts, such as IoT, AI, 5G and the encryption issues related to quantum computing.

Technology advances can fuel heightened productivity, important product development and enhance the ability to meet business objectives. Yet, along with these benefits, technology often introduces new risks. An incomplete understanding of those risks can lead to material consequences. The paper highlights the key role the board and C-suite should play in helping to recognize and respond to the risks that emerging technology presents.

Its important for Boards to ensure that a systemic process exists for recognizing and maximizing outcomes from new technologies. Executive management should evaluate whether appropriate structures and resources are in place to understand both opportunities and significant risks associated with emerging technologies, and where gaps exist, close them, notes Gary Roboff, Senior Advisor at the Shared Assessments Program.

Key practices that should be implemented when planning and adopting new technologies include:

Both internally and with third parties, the paper delves into challenges and opportunities of each of the four most significant emerging technologies. Appropriate actions include:

While specific emerging technologies each represent some level of risk, the interdependencies and cumulative effect of these technologies when integrated can present a significant increase in risk to an enterprise. A clear example is the current IoT environment, which will become a more powerful and capable technology once leveraging 5G and, in the process, yield a more formidable risk challenge for all organizations, said Shawn Malone, Founder & CEO, Security Diligence, LLC.

The briefing paper and companion executive summary can be downloaded at: https://sharedassessments.org/blog/the-role-of-erm/.

About the Shared Assessments Program

As the only organization that has uniquely positioned and developed standardized resources to bring efficiencies to the market for more than a decade, the Shared Assessments Program has become the trusted source in third party risk assurance. Shared Assessments offers opportunities for members to address global risk management challenges through committees, awareness groups, interest groups and special projects.

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Paper Outlines the Role of ERM in Managing Risks Related to New Technologies - Business Wire

Airbus CTO Grazia Vittadini: Aviation needs to tap emerging technologies, diverse talent to get climate-neutral – Verdict Medical Devices – Medical…

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Airbus chief technology officer (CTO) Grazia Vittadini has urged the aviation world to explore new fields including AI and quantum computing in a bid to create a climate-neutral industry, writes Claudia Glover for CBR.

Speaking at an International Aviation Womens Association (IAWA) event, Vittadini said: As aerospace professionals we all know there is no one single solution to the climate change problem.

We need to push aerodynamic structures and smart materials. We need alternative fuels and alternative propulsion using hydrogen in the equation or hydro-electric configuration. We need to push for automated air traffic management and explore new fields like AI and quantum computing, which are enablers for these very ambitious targets.

And to get to this point, the industry needs to become much more diverse she said, adding that her dream of becoming a pilot in the Italian air force took a hit when I was rejected on the grounds that I am a woman. She added that she then paid for a pilots licence with her first salary as an engineer.

It is no secret that the aerospace sector is not exactly diverse when it comes to gender, said the CTO, who sits on the Airbus executive leadership. It is a systemic issue in all engineering-based companies and it will be a long-term effort (to address it).

Returning to a theme of climate change, Vittadini said that sustainability was good business.

There is no profit without climate protection, she said. Preserving our planet is not a nice add-on cherry on the cake that we may choose if we can afford; this is the prerequisite to the future of aviation, ecologically and economically.

The coronavirus crisis has undoubtedly increased this global awareness of how dependent we are on a healthy environment; this is also why in Europe, economic stimulus plans are coming with a lot of green strings attached.

She added that Airbus was working on a range of emerging technologies to improve safety, including self-disinfecting coatings for plane interiors.

Grazia Vittadini became the CTO of the European aerospace giant in 2017, having been with the company since 2002, bringing with her engineering and industrial expertise gained on the Italian side of the Eurofighter project. Among other roles, Vittadini, an experienced engineer, headed up airframe design at the multinational before being appointed CTO.

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Airbus CTO Grazia Vittadini: Aviation needs to tap emerging technologies, diverse talent to get climate-neutral - Verdict Medical Devices - Medical...

Is IT regulation in the DARQ? – IT PRO

This article originally appeared in May's edition of IT Pro 20/20,available here. To sign up to receive each new issue in your inbox, click here.

While the world grapples with the fallout of the COVID-19 coronavirus pandemic and the shift to mass remote working also dubbed the distributed workplace other trends are bubbling under the surface. The growing use of artificial intelligence (AI) in businesses of all stripes is no secret, but there are another three technologies distributed ledger, extended reality, and quantum computing that are becoming increasingly influential as well.

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While SMAC Social, Mobile, Analytics, and Cloud has already changed the relationships service providers have with their customers over the course of recent years, DARQ, as these newer technologies are collectively known, looks set to become even more transformative.

With all these technologies, and AI in particular, becoming mainstream, do we need a new form of regulation to ensure DARQ technologies are used legally, fairly and ethically?

The digital change is not wafting like a gentle summer breeze over the beaches of Malta, says Felix Hufeld, president of the Federal Financial Supervisory Authority. Its sweeping over the industry like a storm and is shaking up business models, companies and even entire markets.

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Regulators have already seen the rapid growth of FinTech, with new companies innovating outside of traditional banking and financial services. This has raised concerns that their regulatory regimes wont be able to keep up with the pace of development.

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Here, some form of automation could deliver a regulatory environment fit for a world dominated by DARQ technologies. A late-2019 survey carried out by the Bank of England and Financial Conduct Authority found 57% of regulated services use AI for risk management and compliance.

Susannah Hammond, senior regulatory intelligence expert at Thomson Reuters, tells IT Pro: Traditionally, regulators [of financial services and data protection technologies] have sought to be technology-neutral when it comes to their rules and requirements, and have focused on the outcomes of the use of any technologies.

The emphasis is on senior managers understanding the new technologies, their limitations, any new risks which may arise (e.g. bias in machine learning, etc.) and the checks and balances to ensure that the technology is, in practice, working as intended. Equally, there is a focus on the resilience of IT infrastructures both in terms of ensuring good customer outcomes and cyber hygiene.

Go digital to meet todays critical compliance and security requirements

Digital transformation helps companies meet critical compliance and security requirements

DARQ offers businesses the tools they need to develop new personalised experiences for their customers. Each element of DARQ will independently usher in new opportunities and ways of working, but it's the convergence of these technologies that really drives innovation what Accenture called the reimagining of entire industries. Indeed, according to Accenture 89% of businesses are already experimenting with one or more DARQ technologies. For example, Volkswagen is using quantum computers to develop intelligent traffic guidance systems.

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Using AI as a component of service automation for instance, opens up questions of accuracy and accountability. At the moment, the focus is on financial services as they expand and accelerate their use of technologies such as machine learning and biometric identification to combat fraud. When other DARQ technologies are added to the mix, this heady cocktail of data becomes difficult to police. Here, RegTech (Regulation Technology) could offer a solution.

The RegTech industry is expanding. According to KPMG, RegTechs predicted share of all regulatory spending by 2022 will reach 34%, with the management consultancy defining RegTech 3.0 as a move from know your customer to know your data. This shift is critical to understand as all of the DARQ technologies are developing to create highly personalised services all of which will need a degree of regulation.

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The initial focus has been on how technologies such as AI are being applied to financial services and the businesses that supply them. RegTech, though, is expected to increase in importance as regulators realise they need new platforms to ensure DARQ technologies remain compliant.

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With regards to AI or quantum, regulations will be crucial for the wider adoption of these technologies as they will provide protection to consumers. This will allow the public to trust that they can safely rely upon these services, explains Benot Sauvage, director of regulatory strategy at Deloitte.

The main issue is that regulations do not yet fully comprehend these technologies. For instance, for AI, it is expected that regulations demand to explain the algorithms and show how results can be overridden or stopped. For quantum there might be a need to adapt cybersecurity rules and data protection rules, he adds.

Businesses and regulators alike are considering how automated systems could help them keep pace with the technological change that will only accelerate when DARQ is considered.

Removing human compliance officers from the decision-making processes is risky, as many of the DARQ technologies are often a black box. RegTech will evolve and become an essential tool. Compliance officers will have little choice than to use these systems if they are to understand the avalanche of regulation that DARQ will attract and how these regulations impact their businesses.

Businesses are striving to implement more automation and DARQ will help them achieve those goals. However, these technologies can seem opaque to the uninitiated and how machine language systems arrive at a conclusion must be explainable. Here, ensuring bias isnt present in the system is vital and must contain some form of oversight.

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However, as Franois-Kim Hug, a partner at Deloitte tells IT Pro, its important not to forget the importance of human input.

The advent of RegTech does not mean the end of the compliance officer, Hug explains. We are still far from a global compliance solution that can anticipate, understand, interpret and implement the ongoing avalanche of regulations impacting all businesses. This means the profile of compliance officers will need to adjust to this new digital reality where new solutions and new ways of working are created daily.

All of the DARQ technologies are on an accelerating upward trajectory, although not all of them will develop at the same pace. Already we see the first widespread applications of AI particularly machine learning whereas other components of the DARQ collective, such as quantum computing, are still in their infancy.

As such, regulators will move forward with defining the compliance regime DARQ must be used within as each component becomes more mainstream and begins to impact consumers.

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For businesses, while most recognise the massive impact SMAC has had, they may not be aware of DARQ or know that its impact could be even more disruptive. Once they wake up to this reality, their development roadmap should come into focus as soon as possible and they can start taking their first steps in using these technologies.

Regulators will, as always, be watching and RegTech could deliver a helpful dose of automated compliance. But that doesnt mean its time to say goodbye to your human compliance officers they will have a vital role to play as we start to more confidently explore the DARQ.

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Is IT regulation in the DARQ? - IT PRO

Sen. Warner: 5G ORAN Bill Added to Must-Pass Legislation – Multichannel News

Sen. Mark Warner (D-Va.) said an ORAN (open radio access network)-targeted 5G funding bill he has championed has been added to the next managers' amendment for the must-pass National Defense Authorization Act, which he said will pass by the end of the year. That is the good news, he said on a USTelecom webinar Tuesday (June 30).

Related: Open RAN Group Sees Cloud on 5G Horizon...and That's a Good Thing

The bad news is that the funding levels have been dramatically cut down to a "minuscule" amount, says Warner, who is ranking member of the Senate Intelligence Committee, an amount that does not signal the U.S. is serious to moving toward a more cloud-base, less Huawei tech-based model for 5G network architecture, he said.

The bill as initially drawn up would provide $1 billion-plus, including $750 million for ORAN R&D and another $500 million for collaboration with international partners. In order to get it into the Defense bill, those numbers have been cut to $50 million (in the first year) for R&D and $25 million for collaboration.

ORAN is open, interoperable more software-centric (virtualized) 5G network architecture that is easier to secure from foreign malware and allows for U.S. and other companies to be bigger network players.

Warner said it is short of 5G as industrial policy, but also a signal that the U.S. recognizes that it is tough for the Samsungs and Nokia's and Ericcsons to compete with Chinese tech suppliers like Huawei that are bankrolled by the Chinese government. Given that, the U.S. has to start thinking differently, he said.

Warner is speaking from experience as the former founder of Nextel.

Warner urged the companies on the Webinar to get their CEOs to weigh in so those figures could be boosted in a further iteration of the bill and the U.S. could reassert its leadership in the 5G competition with the Chinese government.

Related: Tech Companies Coalesce Around Safer 5G RAN Supply Chain

Warner said on the webinar that he thought over the past 20 years or so that we, by which he meant the U.S. and U.S. companies and the West "writ large" were so used to leading in wireless on rules and standards and protocols that "we kind of fell asleep at the switch."

He said that included both the Obama Administration and the Trump Administration, the latter which he said had made things worse, neither of which he said had articulated a clear path forward for 5G.

Warner said that path should be ORAN-centric, which means more modular, cloud-based, and software-centric, which translates to a network based more on the software side that the U.S. has dominated, and which is easier to secure than one based in Huawei tech backed by the Chinese Communist party.

He said not since Sputnik has the U.S. not dominated in standards to the extent it is currently not doing so in 5G.

He also warned that China's rise in 5G tech and standard-setting and the issue of network security could be the blueprint for similar issues with artificial intelligence and quantum computing.

He said the Chinese model was to encourage ferocious competition in the domestic market, then when a "national champion" emerges, support their dominance of the Chinese market, like Huawei in 5G (with 70%-80% of the domestic market), which translates to %20-30% of the global market, which makes it hard competitors that don't have that government incubation.

He said he feared that could happen with AI and cloud computing if the U.S. doesn't get 5G right.

China recently announced a trillion-dollar investment in AI, cloud and other new tech.

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Sen. Warner: 5G ORAN Bill Added to Must-Pass Legislation - Multichannel News

Is teleportation possible? Yes, in the quantum world – University of Rochester

Quantum teleportation is an important step in improving quantum computing.

Beam me up is one of the most famous catchphrases from the Star Trek series. It is the command issued when a character wishes to teleport from a remote location back to the Starship Enterprise.

While human teleportation exists only in science fiction, teleportation is possible in the subatomic world of quantum mechanicsalbeit not in the way typically depicted on TV. In the quantum world, teleportation involves the transportation of information, rather than the transportation of matter.

Last year scientists confirmed that information could be passed between photons on computer chips even when the photons were not physically linked.

Now, according to new research from the University of Rochester and Purdue University, teleportation may also be possible between electrons.

In a paper published in Nature Communications and one to appear in Physical Review X, the researchers, including John Nichol, an assistant professor of physics at Rochester, and Andrew Jordan, a professor of physics at Rochester, explore new ways of creating quantum-mechanical interactions between distant electrons. The research is an important step in improving quantum computing, which, in turn, has the potential to revolutionize technology, medicine, and science by providing faster and more efficient processors and sensors.

Quantum teleportation is a demonstration of what Albert Einstein famously called spooky action at a distancealso known as quantum entanglement. In entanglementone of the basic of concepts of quantum physicsthe properties of one particle affect the properties of another, even when the particles are separated by a large distance. Quantum teleportation involves two distant, entangled particles in which the state of a third particle instantly teleports its state to the two entangled particles.

Quantum teleportation is an important means for transmitting information in quantum computing. While a typical computer consists of billions of transistors, called bits, quantum computers encode information in quantum bits, or qubits. A bit has a single binary value, which can be either 0 or 1, but qubits can be both 0 and 1 at the same time. The ability for individual qubits to simultaneously occupy multiple states underlies the great potential power of quantum computers.

Scientists have recently demonstrated quantum teleportation by using electromagnetic photons to create remotely entangled pairs of qubits.

Qubits made from individual electrons, however, are also promising for transmitting information in semiconductors.

Individual electrons are promising qubits because they interact very easily with each other, and individual electron qubits in semiconductors are also scalable, Nichol says. Reliably creating long-distance interactions between electrons is essential for quantum computing.

Creating entangled pairs of electron qubits that span long distances, which is required for teleportation, has proved challenging, though: while photons naturally propagate over long distances, electrons usually are confined to one place.

In order to demonstrate quantum teleportation using electrons, the researchers harnessed a recently developed technique based on the principles of Heisenberg exchange coupling. An individual electron is like a bar magnet with a north pole and a south pole that can point either up or down. The direction of the polewhether the north pole is pointing up or down, for instanceis known as the electrons magnetic moment or quantum spin state. If certain kinds of particles have the same magnetic moment, they cannot be in the same place at the same time. That is, two electrons in the same quantum state cannot sit on top of each other. If they did, their states would swap back and forth in time.

The researchers used the technique to distribute entangled pairs of electrons and teleport their spin states.

We provide evidence for entanglement swapping, in which we create entanglement between two electrons even though the particles never interact, and quantum gate teleportation, a potentially useful technique for quantum computing using teleportation, Nichol says. Our work shows that this can be done even without photons.

The results pave the way for future research on quantum teleportation involving spin states of all matter, not just photons, and provide more evidence for the surprisingly useful capabilities of individual electrons in qubit semiconductors.

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Is teleportation possible? Yes, in the quantum world - University of Rochester

JPMorgan Shows Its Chops in Quantum Computing. Heres Why It Matters. – Barron’s

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Quantum computing has the promise to reshape industries by unleashing computing power well beyond what traditional computers have. Logistics, pharmaceuticals and financial services all stand to benefit from applying the new technology.

JPMorgan Chase (ticker: JPM) published data last week about one of its quantum-computing experiments demonstrating the banks growing expertise in that realm. The academic-style paper is a little Byzantine, but investors should pay attention, because they will be hearing more about quantum computing from other players, including Honeywell (HON), Microsoft (MSFT) and Google parent Alphabet (GOOGL) in the near future.

In this paper, we present a novel, canonical way to produce a quantum oracle from an algebraic expression, the authors of the JPMorgan paper wrote. Thats a mouthful. Canonical, in this instance, appears to mean authoritative. And according to Microsoft, a quantum oracle is a is a black box operation that is used as input to another algorithm.

Microsofts definition only raises more questions and probably doesnt help many of the uninitiated, Barrons included. Classically, an oracle answers questions about the future. That isnt a bad analogy for quantum computing. The technology is mysterious and its power not completely understood by many peopleinvestors included.

The use of a quantum oracle, in this instance, makes doing complicated math with fibonacci numbers easier than with traditional computing systems. Fibonacci numbers form a sequence in which each number is the sum of the prior two. The sequences have applications in investing and information security, among other areas.

The Morgan team ran their experiment on the new Honeywell computer based on trapped-ion technology with quantum volume 64.

Honeywell has the hardware. And just before the JPMorgan paper was released, the industrial conglomerate announced it had created the worlds most powerful quantum computer, achieving a quantum volume of 64. Essentially, Honeywell has successfully tethered six q-bits, or quantum bits, together.

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Quantum volume is an industry term. The number 64 comes from 2 raised to the power of 6. A big reason quantum computers can do more is the q-bits can have two values at the same time. Six bits can have, essentially, 64 states at once. Quite frankly, its all a little confusing.

Today, quantum computers can still be beaten in most applications by traditional computers. But quantum power is growing. The first Wright brother flight went 600 meters, Christopher Savoie, founder and CEO of quantum computing firm Zapata Computing, said. He was explaining how to think of the current generation of quantum-computing technology. The Wright brothers flight happened in 1903 and by 1918 there were air forces around the globe.

Zapata partners with Honeywell to help develop quantum programs, applications and algorithms. Zapata helps with the software running on Honeywell hardware used by JPMorgan.

The capability of [quantum computing] is exponential, Savoie said. There is a hockey-stick-like pattern that develops as more q-bits are added to the system. It will be tough to find an area of human activity where this wont help.

It is a little mind bending. But paying attention early will give investors an edge down the road.

JPMorgan stock was down more than 2% last week, worse than the 1.9% and 1% respective gains of the Dow Jones Industrial Average and S&P 500 over the same span. Honeywell shares gained 0.6% last week.

Write to Al Root at allen.root@dowjones.com

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JPMorgan Shows Its Chops in Quantum Computing. Heres Why It Matters. - Barron's

Physicist Chen Wang Receives DOE Early Career Award – UMass News and Media Relations

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announced this week that it has named 76 scientists from across the country, including assistant professor of physics Chen Wang, to receive significant funding for research with its Early Career Award. It provides university-based researchers with at least $150,000 per year in research support for five years.

DOE Under Secretary for Science Paul Dabbar says DOE is proud to support funding that will sustain Americas scientific workforce and create opportunities for our researchers to remain competitive on the world stage. By bolstering our commitment to the scientific community, we invest into our nations next generation of innovators.

Wang says, I feel very honored to receive this award. This is a great opportunity to explore a new paradigm of reducing error for emerging quantum technologies.

His project involves enhancing quantum bit (qubit) performance using a counter-intuitive new approach. He will harness friction usually an unwelcome source of error in quantum devices to make qubits perform with fewer errors. The work is most relevant for quantum computing, he says, but potential applications include also cryptography, communications and simulations.

One of the basic differences between classical and quantum computing which is not in practical use yet is that classical computers perform calculations and store data using stable bits labeled as zero or one that never unintendently change. Accidental change would introduce error.

By contrast, in quantum computing, qubits can flip from zero to one or anywhere between. This is a source of their great promise to vastly expand quantum computers ability to perform calculations and store data, but it also introduces errors, Wang explains.

The world is intrinsically quantum, he says, so using a classical computer to make predictions at the quantum level about the properties of anything composed of more than a few dozens of atoms is limited. Quantum computing increases the ability to process information exponentially. With every extra qubit you add, the amount of information you can process doubles.

Think of the state of a bit or a qubit as a position on a sphere, he says. For a classical bit, a zero or one is stable, maybe the north or south pole. But a quantum bit can be anywhere on the surface or be continuously tuned between zero and one.

To address potential errors, Wang plans to explore a new method to reduce qubit errors by introducing autonomous error correction the qubit corrects itself. In quantum computing, correcting errors is substantially harder than in classical computing because you are literally forbidden from reading your bits or making backups, he says.

Quantum error correction is a beautiful, surprising and complicated possibility that makes a very exciting experimental challenge. Implementing the physics of quantum error correction is the most fascinating thing I can think of in quantum physics.

We are already familiar with how friction helps in stabilizing a classical, non-quantum system, he says, such as a swinging pendulum. The pendulum will eventually stop due to friction the resistance of air dissipates energy and the pendulum will not randomly go anywhere, Wang points out.

In much the same way, introducing friction between a qubit and its environment puts a stabilizing force on it. When it deviates, the environment will give it a kick back in place, he says. However, the kick has to be designed in very special ways. Wang will experiment using a super-cooled superconducting device made of a sapphire chip on which he will deposit a very thin patterned aluminum film.

He says, Its a very difficult challenge, because to have one qubit correct its errors, by some estimates you need tens to even thousands of other qubits to help it, and they need to be in communication. But it is worthwhile because with them, we can do things faster and we can do tasks that are impossible with classical computing now.

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Physicist Chen Wang Receives DOE Early Career Award - UMass News and Media Relations

Teleportation Is Indeed Possible At Least in the Quantum World – SciTechDaily

Quantum teleportation is an important step in improving quantum computing.

Beam me up is one of the most famous catchphrases from the Star Trek series. It is the command issued when a character wishes to teleport from a remote location back to the Starship Enterprise.

While human teleportation exists only in science fiction, teleportation is possible in the subatomic world of quantum mechanicsalbeit not in the way typically depicted on TV. In the quantum world, teleportation involves the transportation of information, rather than the transportation of matter.

Last year scientists confirmed that information could be passed between photons on computer chips even when the photons were not physically linked.

Now, according to new research from the University of Rochester and Purdue University, teleportation may also be possible between electrons.

A quantum processor semiconductor chip is connected to a circuit board in the lab of John Nichol, an assistant professor of physics at the University of Rochester. Nichol and Andrew Jordan, a professor of physics, are exploring new ways of creating quantum-mechanical interactions between distant electrons, promising major advances in quantum computing. Credit: University of Rochester photo / J. Adam Fenster

In a paper published in Nature Communications and one to appear in Physical Review X, the researchers, including John Nichol, an assistant professor of physics at Rochester, and Andrew Jordan, a professor of physics at Rochester, explore new ways of creating quantum-mechanical interactions between distant electrons. The research is an important step in improving quantum computing, which, in turn, has the potential to revolutionize technology, medicine, and science by providing faster and more efficient processors and sensors.

Quantum teleportation is a demonstration of what Albert Einstein famously called spooky action at a distancealso known as quantum entanglement. In entanglementone of the basic of concepts of quantum physicsthe properties of one particle affect the properties of another, even when the particles are separated by a large distance. Quantum teleportation involves two distant, entangled particles in which the state of a third particle instantly teleports its state to the two entangled particles.

Quantum teleportation is an important means for transmitting information in quantum computing. While a typical computer consists of billions of transistors, called bits, quantum computers encode information in quantum bits, or qubits. A bit has a single binary value, which can be either 0 or 1, but qubits can be both 0 and 1 at the same time. The ability for individual qubits to simultaneously occupy multiple states underlies the great potential power of quantum computers.

Scientists have recently demonstrated quantum teleportation by using electromagnetic photons to create remotely entangled pairs of qubits.

Qubits made from individual electrons, however, are also promising for transmitting information in semiconductors.

Individual electrons are promising qubits because they interact very easily with each other, and individual electron qubits in semiconductors are also scalable, Nichol says. Reliably creating long-distance interactions between electrons is essential for quantum computing.

Creating entangled pairs of electron qubits that span long distances, which is required for teleportation, has proved challenging, though: while photons naturally propagate over long distances, electrons usually are confined to one place.

In order to demonstrate quantum teleportation using electrons, the researchers harnessed a recently developed technique based on the principles of Heisenberg exchange coupling. An individual electron is like a bar magnet with a north pole and a south pole that can point either up or down. The direction of the polewhether the north pole is pointing up or down, for instanceis known as the electrons magnetic moment or quantum spin state. If certain kinds of particles have the same magnetic moment, they cannot be in the same place at the same time. That is, two electrons in the same quantum state cannot sit on top of each other. If they did, their states would swap back and forth in time.

The researchers used the technique to distribute entangled pairs of electrons and teleport their spin states.

We provide evidence for entanglement swapping, in which we create entanglement between two electrons even though the particles never interact, and quantum gate teleportation, a potentially useful technique for quantum computing using teleportation, Nichol says. Our work shows that this can be done even without photons.

The results pave the way for future research on quantum teleportation involving spin states of all matter, not just photons, and provide more evidence for the surprisingly useful capabilities of individual electrons in qubit semiconductors.

References:

Conditional teleportation of quantum-dot spin states by Haifeng Qiao, Yadav P. Kandel, Sreenath K. Manikandan, Andrew N. Jordan, Saeed Fallahi, Geoffrey C. Gardner, Michael J. Manfra and John M. Nichol, 15 June 2020, Nature Communications.DOI: 10.1038/s41467-020-16745-0

Coherent multi-spin exchange in a quantum-dot spin chain by Haifeng Qiao, Yadav P. Kandel, Kuangyin Deng, Saeed Fallahi, Geoffrey C. Gardner, Michael J. Manfra, Edwin Barnes, John M. Nichol, Accepted 12 May 2020, Physical Review X.arXiv: 2001.02277

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Teleportation Is Indeed Possible At Least in the Quantum World - SciTechDaily

Cambridge Innovation Capital plc: Annual results for the year ended 31 March 2020 – PharmiWeb.com

Expansion to 30 portfolio companies and 46% increase in net asset value, reinforcing CICs position as the most active series A investor in the Cambridge ecosystem

22 June 2020

Cambridge Innovation Capital plc (CIC), the venture capital investor enabling visionaries to build global, category-leading companies in the Cambridge ecosystem, today announces highlights from its annual results for the year ended 31 March 2020.

Andrew Williamson, Managing Partner of CIC, commented: Despite the recent challenges posed by the global coronavirus pandemic, we have made tremendous progress during the year. Our portfolio now includes one company valued in excess of 1 billion and another that has listed on Nasdaq, our first IPO. We have expanded the number of companies in, and value of, our portfolio, enhanced our potential deal flow with the creation of two accelerators and augmented our team to support the growth of the business.

Highlights

Net assets grew by 46% to 301.7 million at 31 March 2020 (2019: 206.4 million)

35.7 million (2019: 44.9 million) invested into four new and 12 existing portfolio companies, bringing the total invested to 163.0 million in 30 companies (2019: 127.3 million in 26 companies)

A fair value increase of 69.5 million (2019: 30.7 million) which, together with investments, resulted in a portfolio value of 291.5 million (2019: 186.3 million)

42.5 million (2019: 38.6 million) drawn down from the 150 million committed by shareholders in the year ended 31 March 2019

Welcomed Riverlane, Sense Biodetection, PredictImmune and Immutrin to CICs family of portfolio companies (and PetMedix post-period)

Bicycle Therapeutics conducted its NASDAQ IPO to progress its programmes, including toxin drug conjugates and immune modulators, to treat cancer and other debilitating diseases

CMR Surgical closed a 195.0 million Series C funding round to commercialise its next generation surgical robotic system

Expanded our team with the appointment of Vin Lingathoti as a Partner in our investment team, Nick Richards as General Counsel and Michelle Lamprecht as Head of Marketing

Further details

Bicycle Therapeutics, where we participated in its Nasdaq IPO to progress the companys pipeline of Bicycle Toxin Conjugates and Immune Cell Agonists to treat cancer and other debilitating diseases. Bicycle Therapeutics is the first company in our diverse portfolio to conduct an IPO and exemplifies the way in which we support the transformation of exciting, early-stage companies from the Cambridge ecosystem as they develop into global, category-leading companies.

CMR Surgical, which closed a 195 million Series C funding round, Europes largest private financing round in the medical technology sector, to commercialise its next-generation surgical robotic system, Versius. We were an early investor in CMR Surgical, having first invested in the companys Series A round in 2016, and we have continued to provide financial support and guidance to the company, enabling the realisation of the potential of the Versius system. The proceeds will be used to drive the next stage of CMR Surgicals growth, including the planned commercialisation of its Versius system, while supporting continued research and development, manufacturing and expansion.

AudioTelligence, in which we participated in a 6.5 million Series A funding. AudioTelligence is dedicated to making speech clear and intelligible in a noisy world. While the adoption of voice-activated technologies in smart homes and workplaces is on the rise, the accuracy of modern speech recognition systems remains severely limited in noisy environments. To tackle this problem, AudioTelligences technology acts like autofocus for sound, using data-driven blind audio signal separation to focus on the source of interest, allowing it to be separated from interfering noises. This enables microphones to focus on what users are saying, improving the audio quality for listeners, regardless of background noise.

Cytora, which closed a 25 million Series B financing round, to continue developing its artificial intelligence-powered insurance technology platform that enables insurers to underwrite more accurately, reduce frictional costs and achieve profitable growth. Cytoras underwriting platform applies Machine Learning and Natural Language Processing techniques to public and proprietary data sets, including property construction features, company financials and local weather. The platform combines these data sets with an insurance companys internal data to better predict risk, thereby ensuring more accurate risk pricing.

Riverlane, a quantum computing software developer transforming the discovery of new materials and drugs. We led the 3.3 million seed round in which Cambridge Enterprise, the commercialisation arm of the University of Cambridge, also participated. Riverlanes software leverages the capabilities of quantum computers, which operate using the principles of quantum mechanics. In the same way that graphics processing units accelerate machine learning workloads, Riverlane uses quantum computers to accelerate the simulation of quantum systems. Riverlane is working with leading academics and companies on critical early use cases for its software, such as developing new battery materials and drug treatments.

Sense Biodetection, in which we co-led the 12.3 million Series A funding round alongside Earlybird, to develop a portfolio of instrument-free, point-of-care molecular diagnostic tests, a pioneering new class of diagnostic product. Sense Biodetection plans to invest the new funds in the development and manufacture of a range of tests utilising its novel and proprietary rapid molecular amplification technology, targeting in the first instance infectious disease applications such as COVID-19 and influenza. Instrument-free molecular diagnostics represent the ultimate flexible test format as the tests could be deployed in any setting and by a wide range of potential users. This has the potential to be transformational for the diagnostic industry, delivering for the first time true point-of-care testing in a market-successful, single-use product format, allowing diagnostic tests to be readily adopted by new users and scaled to meet demand.

During the year we also announced the launch of Start Codon and established DeepTech.labs, two new accelerators that are focused on accelerating the translation of world-class research into commercially successful companies. The Cambridge ecosystem has already produced over a dozen billion-pound businesses and we believe that these accelerators will be important facilitators in creating many such further successes. We are extremely proud to be founders and co-owners and we eagerly await the world-class businesses that will emerge from their programmes in the future.

Post-period Highlights

We invested in PetMedix, a Cambridge, UK-based biopharmaceutical company developing antibody-based therapeutics for companion animals and our first investment in the animal health space. PetMedix has developed an innovative platform for the creation of naturally generated, fully species-specific therapeutic antibodies, enabling the discovery of its own veterinary medicines to target some of the most important clinical areas in animal health.

Inivata, a leader in liquid biopsy, formed a strategic collaboration with NeoGenomics, Inc (NASDAQ: NEO), for the commercialisation of its InVisionFirst -Lung liquid biopsy test in the US. NeoGenomics is a leading US-based cancer diagnostics and services company, and an established player in the field with significant commercial reach and scale. NeoGenomics also made a $25 million equity investment in Inivata and an option to acquire the company outright. The new funding will be used to accelerate the companys innovative liquid biopsy products, including further development work on RaDaR, the newly launched highly sensitive personalized assay for the detection of residual disease and recurrence.

Microbiotica entered a major collaboration with Cancer Research UK and Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust (CUH) to identify and develop microbiome co-therapeutics and biomarkers for cancer patients receiving immune checkpoint inhibitor therapy. The collaboration is based on clinical studies conducted by CUH that evaluate immune checkpoint inhibitor drug response in cancer patients, combined with Microbioticas unrivalled microbiome profiling and analysis capability.

A consortium led by Riverlane has been awarded a 7.6 million grant from the government's Industrial Challenge Strategy Fund to deploy a highly innovative quantum operating system. The project will deliver an operating system that allows the same quantum software to run on different types of quantum computing hardware. The aim is to install Deltaflow.OS, a quantum operating system, on every quantum computer in the UK, thereby accelerating the commercialisation of the UKs quantum computing sector.

Exvastat has been awarded a 3.6 million grant from the European Commissions Innovative Medicines Initiative to fund a clinical study of Imprenti, an intravenous formulation of imatinib, in the treatment of COVID-19-associated Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS). Under the award, Exvastat will collaborate with Vrije Universitat Amsterdam, the Amsterdam Medical Center, KABS Pharmaceutical Services of Canada and the clinical research organisation, Simbec-Orion.

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Cambridge Innovation Capital plc: Annual results for the year ended 31 March 2020 - PharmiWeb.com

Docuseries takes viewers into the lives and labs of scientists – UChicago News

The camera crew was given full access to Earnest-Nobles research. In several scenes, Earnest-Noble is suited up in white PPE in the Pritzker Nanofabrication Facility in the Eckhardt Research Center. His scientific process and the breakthrough he seeks are depicted with animations and close-up footage of the state-of-the-art facilities. The filmmakers capture Earnest-Noble in the midst of a failed attempt or among his graveyard of failed quantum devices. As he embraces his doubts and is propelled by tenacity, viewers witness an emotional depiction of real science.

Earnest-Nobles lively interviews focus on the experience versus the result of his labors, providing a realistic portrayal of graduate studies and enabling viewers to follow him to his goal of identifying the ideal qubit for superpositiona phenomenon in quantum mechanics in which a particle can exist in several states at once.

When we were filming, I was trying to explain a qubit or something, and how much I was using jargon words was eye-opening to me. It helped me appreciate the challenge of making science understandable, said Earnest-Noble, who is now a quantum computing researcher at IBM. Science is a process far more than a series of facts. That became clear to me from working on this project.

Science communications typically takes a very long struggle of discovery and wraps it up into a pretty package, said Schuster. But something I found very special in this story is that you got to follow Nate for a couple of years. It accurately captured what Nates experience was like. And it focused on his experience, and not on the result, which is pretty amazing."

STAGEs director of science Sunanda Prabhu-Gaunkar originally joined the STAGE lab as a postdoc, and taught herself filmmaking in order to create the series. The scientific process inspires our filmmaking, she said. The workflow embraces failure, remains receptive to discoveries through iteration, and allows for risk-taking, all within a highly collaborative process.

Ellen Askey, the pilot episodes co-director, joined the project as a first-year student at UChicago with prior filmmaking experience. She worked on the series across her college career, graduating in June with a degree in cinema and media studies. Showing a story develop over time can be powerful, she said. We hope to get it out there to a lot of people who are and who are not yet interested in science.

Interested attendees can register through Eventbrite.

Adapted from an article by Maureen McMahon posted on the Physical Sciences Division website.

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Docuseries takes viewers into the lives and labs of scientists - UChicago News